Vintage Mustang Forums banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
335 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
As I trump through the restoration of my Mach I notice how many different things there are on 71-73's. My repop floor pans fit in beautiful, but the rot below the rear seat needs donor metal. There are at least 2 different types of seat hooks welded to the floor pans, there are a couple extra brackets between the frame rail and rocker on the donor parts I have, but not on mine.(Different seat belt mounts) Seat risers are different between fastbacks and coupes. Different pedals and brackets from power brakes to nonpower brakes, disc to drum, etc. And then all of those "spare" brackets on the fender aprons. Cowl to apron, front apron support, and who knows what else. Makes restoration interesting!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,638 Posts
I'm running into the same thing restoring my '67 and using a lot of '68 parts. The two years may look a lot alike, but they are very different. So far I've been lucky and all my '68 stuff has went in pretty smooth. I now have a complete '68 suspension, disc brakes, steering box and steering column on my '67. Good luck with the restoration!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,323 Posts
Think thats interesting? I am/have been in the process of restoring a very rare Type 3 VW Karmann Ghia. Its a model that they never imported officially into the united states in the 60's Only 42,000 were ever made and they were literally all hand built. The body style never changed from 1962-1969 and there are only about 500 VIN numbers known to still survive. It looks sort of like a Corvair and was considered a very expensive car in 1966. ( US price was approx $4,000!!) Though they were never officially imported here in the US, this is where you will find most of the survivors. Now you would think it would be easy that if you found a donor car for parts ( and believe me they rot 10X worse than Mustangs) to just fit the replacememt panels and Voila! Wrong! The cars were all hand built and leaded in many areas by different people. Body parts from the SAME YEAR do not fit onto others so easily. Funny, considering one of VW's famous ad's shows a Bug with different doors and fenders and bumpers from different years to stress the interchangeability and how VW never changes for looks alone but rather to make the car better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
466 Posts
Don't get frustrated, it's worth the effort!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,829 Posts
Many parts on the 71-3's are "almost" interchangeable, which you have found out.

Most obvious is the fenders and front bumper on the 73. Impact standards came along in 73, which luckily the Mustang fared well with the front urethane impact bumper and the 1" spaced out rear bumper.

Rear decklids are different in the years, when Ford went from an intenal clip for the lock to an externally accesable unit. Too many workers were getting cut by the sharp framework ofthe lids. 72 also saw the "mustang" script used on the trunk lid, whereas the 71 coupe and vert had the block letters and the fastback had the "mustang" tape stripe.

Seat platforms are unique to each bodystyle, coupe, convertible and fastback. The fastback platforms are much lower, allowing headroom for guys like me who are 6'4". Even between the years there were minor tooling changes in knockout shapes and such.

The rear seat areas had different brackets depending on the year and bodystyle. Ford changed them a couple times for whatever reason. The floor also changed when the rear seats upgraded to retractable belts mounted inside the quarter trim panel instead of the manually adjustable units that bolted behind the seat bottom.

72 saw the institution of the hated seat belt "reminder" system that would drive you bonkers, as well as the first true emissions control systems.

TCS systems were instituted on some models (transmission controlled spark) that would retard timing in cruise mode in top gear IIRC.

There was also a speed and temp regulated spark control system that IIRC was mainly installed on 351C powered 73's. You will see this being auctioned on eBay, often mistakenly billed as a "cruise control" system which was not a factory option in 71-3.

There were 4 different pedal supports. Manual drum, manual trans. Manual drum, auto trans. Power Disc, manual trans. Power disc, auto trans. There were also differences between each year as the fusebox bracketry changed and the steering column clamps were modified.

Another one that I've noticed is the angle bracket from torque box to front frame rail. I had a 73 6cyl vert that didn't have it, yet every other 71-3 I've had did, but they were all non-vert V-8 cars. I'm thinking it may be a 6cyl only thing, but not sure yet.

Alot of the extra boltholes and brackets in the engine compartment stem from the reality that the radiator support is from a 70 Torino, as well as the lower portion of the front fender aprons. The Torino had a large reinforcement bracket the runs across the top of the apron and shocktower, unlike the Mustang. The aprons and support were also used in the 71-3 Cougar and the 70-1 Montego.

Nothing like a parts bin car, huh! ::
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
758 Posts
Think thats interesting? I am/have been in the process of restoring a very rare Type 3 VW Karmann Ghia. Its a model that they never imported officially into the united states in the 60's Only 42,000 were ever made and they were literally all hand built. The body style never changed from 1962-1969 and there are only about 500 VIN numbers known to still survive. It looks sort of like a Corvair
Huh. When I worked in a wrecking yard, briefly and some 26 years ago, there was one of those in the row. I had no idea what it was, and still wasn't sure after the owner told me. :)

It was complete and in pretty good condition, IIRC. I'd hope someone took it home and made it one of the survivors...

(James Auto Wreckers in Roseville, CA, if you want to run it down... I suppose it could still be there!)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,045 Posts
I saw two of those in Kansas in 88. The only identifier was the Karmann Ghia badging. I have not seen any since, and my VW nut buddies (at one time, the yard was full of 66's with the 1300's) never believed me. Best description I've ever heard. Looks like the early Corvair, only smaller. Thanks for the history lesson. I believe there is also a Nash roadster that was hand built. Same problem: no two body's have interchangeable pieces. The guy that had it was fabricating a new hood out of fiberglas because the one from his donor car wasn't even close. He also had cobbled a 68 XR-7 dash into it as all of the guages in both cars were gone.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top