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1968 mustang coupe
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So I have a 1968 mustang with the 200ci 6 cylinder and the stock rear end and I'm currently in the process of getting all the parts for a 302 swap and I found a 1998 ford explorer with the 8.8 inch rear end with 373 gearing and Limited slip. And I wanted to know how hard would it be to swap? What would I need to do to make it work? And does it have to be narrowed? Any help is greatly appreciated.
 

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Dimples
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Lots of info on this swap. As far as narrowing for your 68, the answer is maybe. Not strictly necessary for the width, but many folks opt to do it anyway to center the diff.

 

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So I have a 1968 mustang with the 200ci 6 cylinder and the stock rear end and I'm currently in the process of getting all the parts for a 302 swap and I found a 1998 ford explorer with the 8.8 inch rear end with 373 gearing and Limited slip. And I wanted to know how hard would it be to swap? What would I need to do to make it work? And does it have to be narrowed? Any help is greatly appreciated.
Yes, it needs to be narrowed. The general narrowing procedure only requires narrowing one side though and using a 2nd short axle after the long side has been narrowed. In addition to narrowing you also need to weld on spring perches. Honestly I find the whole thing kinda silly...its not any easier than choosing an axle you have to narrow both ends since you run the risk of warping the tubes and having to have them straightened anyway and after you are done your axle is slightly narrower than stock anyway. The only real advantage in choosing an old explorer 8.8" over say....a 2012 F150 8.8" axle is that you can re-use stock explorer axles instead of having a custom set made....but custom axles for Ford rear ends aren't really that expensive to begin with

In my opinion you are better off buying a cheap used 8" and swapping gears and adding a LSD...especially for a 6 cylinder, they are easy to find for 67-68. 8.8s have certain advantages over an 8" or 9"...but in the end, they have more disadvantages(IE cast iron center section makes adding a 3-link setup harder later on, the c-clip setup has less peace-of-mind than the bearing retainer setup of an 8" or 9", etc)
 

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68 Mustang Coupe
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You only need to shorten the long side if you have a 65/66 car. It's the perfect width for 67/68. Some have cut off the brackets, welded on the spring perches and ran them with the diff offset. If you're not lowered it's typically a non-issue.
 

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You only need to shorten the long side if you have a 65/66 car. It's the perfect width for 67/68. Some have cut off the brackets, welded on the spring perches and ran them with the diff offset. If you're not lowered it's typically a non-issue.
I am curious about this....in particular the issues this raises with pinion offset:



Here we have a picture of an 8.8"(also going in a '66 Mustang, stole pic from another forum). You can clearly see the longer passenger side axle tube here. The 8.8" already has the pinion offset to the driver side before the longer passenger side axle even comes into account...putting an un-shortened axle into any year Mustang is sure to exacerbate the offset issue. At what point does this offset become enough to cause drivetrain vibration? At this point the pinion is more than 1.5" off center.....and if you consider than the stock 8" or 9" axle is offset to the passenger side instead of the driver side, I just wonder how this can't become a problem?
 

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68 Mustang Coupe
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I am curious about this....in particular the issues this raises with pinion offset:



Here we have a picture of an 8.8"(also going in a '66 Mustang, stole pic from another forum). You can clearly see the longer passenger side axle tube here. The 8.8" already has the pinion offset to the driver side before the longer passenger side axle even comes into account...putting an un-shortened axle into any year Mustang is sure to exacerbate the offset issue. At what point does this offset become enough to cause drivetrain vibration? At this point the pinion is more than 1.5" off center.....and if you consider than the stock 8" or 9" axle is offset to the passenger side instead of the driver side, I just wonder how this can't become a problem?
So long as the planes are the same, the angle can be pretty steep. Moving it two inches isn't gonna change the angle that much.
 

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Dimples
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There's been plenty of debate on the offset pinion. While there's some disagreement, the consensus seems to be that if it's properly setup, the offset pinion is fine. may have to clearance the pan a bit though.
 

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I guess it makes sense, since its effectively the same as raising the vehicle, assuming the angles are withing the tolerance of the u-joint(and that the axle is square to the drivetrain).
 

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i use a Fox 8.8 in a 1967. No narrowing (I didn't have wheels at this point, but I think it only differs by an inch?)

I had to remove the mounting points for the 8.8, and weld on leaf spring perches. As well as swap the axles for 5 lug.
 

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i use a Fox 8.8 in a 1967. No narrowing (I didn't have wheels at this point, but I think it only differs by an inch?)

I had to remove the mounting points for the 8.8, and weld on leaf spring perches. As well as swap the axles for 5 lug.
Out of curiosity...what did you end up with for WMS-to-WMS width? Same as the stock 8"? Narrower by x amount? wider by x amount?
 
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