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Discussion Starter #1
I replaced the yoke on my 9" and may need to re-do it because of the slop in the crush sleeve. Is this something I can get to while everything is still in place? Gears were 100% fine before replacing the old busted yoke...so I just need to get the sleeve in and torque it up properly. Just not sure how buried that crush sleeve is...

1) remove yoke, slide out bearing, then sleeve...then reverse :D - or -

2) remove pinion housing then get at it that way - or - ::

3) take the whole pumpkin out and deal with it off the car :(
 

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I've heard of two ways to do this, although I prefer the second:
Before you take the yoke off (too late for you), take an inch/pound torque wrench and measure the amount it takes to rotate the yoke. Wheels should be off.
Refit the new yoke and tighten the pinion nut until you get the same reading to rotate. This one I found in a Ford service manual.
The second is to find someone who sells the selective shims that replace crush sleeves. Simply pull out the old crush sleeve, measure it with a mic, and then build up your selective shims to match.
I've since lost my source for these shims (hint, hint).
 

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Drain gear oil (or it'll drain all over you, when you remove the yoke *G*), remove yoke and proceed.

Personally, I like popping out the pinion housing to do the R&R and then do the final torquing with it back in the housing, if I don't have a large bench vise to clamp the yoke in. The pinion housing seal is an o-ring, which usually can be re-used if a new one isn't available. You'll need, at minimum (I like using all new parts for anything which has been disturbed), a new crush sleeve and new yoke seal.
 

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The second is to find someone who sells the selective shims that replace crush sleeves. Simply pull out the old crush sleeve, measure it with a mic, and then build up your selective shims to match.

The procedure, at least with regard to racing rears, is a bit different. I machine a precision spacer out of 1040 to a nominal measurement and then, through trial and error, bring the dimension to the proper one to secure proper bearing preload (with new bearings) for that particular pinion housing. All housings are slightly different, IME. After the correct thickness is established, I case harden the spacer. A better way would be to harden the rough spacer first and then surface or blanchard grind the surfaces to bring it to within spec. I don't have those machines so had to secure an alterntive method.

I've run the spacers in a couple of OEM pinion supports I've done for friends as well as in the aluminum support which is in the MW 9" in the race car. No problems to date. As racing work is done on a charity basis (I can never charge what my time is worth), I don't do racing related stuff as part of everyday business. Don't ask *G*.

I believe you can get a semi-finished spacer from MW, among others.
 
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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the help. I was worried that the whole thing was fried. I like the mic-ing of the old sleeve, and using shims...makes great sense.

I put the old yoke on (not knowing enough to replace the crush sleeve) and the gears and/or bearing make noise. I only drove it a couple hundred yards, and now it's back in the air. I'm going to take it apart again and get the shims.

Worst case is that I go through the shim install and it still isn't OK...and then that means the whole pumpkin is going to the axle shop.

It's a Sunday-only car, so i was just hoping to avoid shelling out the dinero on this - paint job is around the corner and I dont want to dip into those funds

Thanks for the advice!! :)
 

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Art comes through again!
Thanks a bunch. I tried searching, but couldn't quite come up with spacer/shim. Brain fade?

When I built up the 9" for the restomod I did it on the bench and used the spacers/shims so I could use different yokes. I have some different yoke lengths so I figured if I ran into a driveshaft of a longer length I could try the shorter yoke and see if it measured out right.
And, of course, it really helps when you go to change seals.

I have been under one when I struggled to pop it loose and it broke before I (and the catch pan) was ready.
One entire bag of kitty litter later...
"I love the smell of 90 weight in the morning"
 

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Pat,

Comparing the Ratech shims or building one as you outline...what would be the benefit of building one vs the stackup method?
Is it that the selective shim pack isn't selective enough?
 

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I actually got the idea from MW. In race rears, the bearings are changed at every maintenance cycle and most builders prefer the simplicity and accuracy of a dedicated bearing spacer; no shims to lose or distort and no crush sleeve to negotiate with. The guys with ball bearing supports obviate the whole nine yards anyway.

As bearings appear to be much more accurately made than pinion supports, IME (the OEM's anyway), the spacer always travels with the support, which doesn't usually change dimensionally over time.

Any of the methods discussed, including the crush sleeve, will give accurate results if done correctly. The spacer, at least IME, is just the fastest and easiest once put into service. Not an issue for street cars but definitely one for race cars being worked on in the pits between rounds. It's incredible, when pressed, how quickly a ring and pinion can be changed in a race car rear. I'm speaking from back in the days before racers carried spare third members already set up in the trailers.
 
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