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So my '66 came with a non-Ford aftermarket a/c system (I think it might actually be from Sears). I removed it recently and was going to just cover the drain hole(s) on the tunnel until I install either a Ford system or a newer type system in the future (years). This system actually had two condensate drains and it looks like the holes were just punched through the floor pan kind of carelessly. I'm sure they had no way of accessing them at the time with the transmission in place but my trans is out right now and it really bothers me how it was done.

What do y'all think, should I-
A) flatten out the jagged edges back in place with a hammer and then just drill out for the smallest hole I can and install a rubber plug, or should I
B) try to cut the jagged edges with a dremel and then drill out the smallest hole I can and then install rubber plugs, or
C) ?

I'm not doing any welding or major sheetmetal repairs right now, just want to clean it up and make sure it's sealed properly before I put the transmission back in. Also, thinking that maybe they could be utilized for a future a/c system. I haven't studied the assembly manual real closely for the factory intended locations but I'm hoping it's pretty close.

IMG_5608.jpg IMG_6456.jpg IMG_6457.jpg IMG_6458.jpg IMG_6459.jpg
 

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I'd punch them flat again, and ideally weld them shut. Neither of them is in the correct location for a factory system (one hole on the pass side). If no welding right now, then squirt a glob of silicone on both side just to seal them up for now. You can weld them shut later.
 

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What he said, except seam sealer instead of silicone. Silicone has an annoying habit of not accepting paint, and contaminating the area so it soesn't accept paint, either.
 

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Since you're not doing welding, I suggest you treat the hole like the other holes in the floor board. Open up the hole to match the seat access hole diameter and use a seat access hole plug. If you can shake the couch and find $0.90, you should be good to go. Apply a bead of silicone sealer when you install it from the underside.
 
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