Vintage Mustang Forums banner
  • Hey everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part MAY's Ride of the Month Challenge!

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
242 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all,

I'm about to install my new Maverick MC and Scott Drake adjustable pushrod. A couple of questions:

1. How long should the push rod be adjusted to?
2. Do I just shove the push rod in and it'll seat on it's own?
3. What's the best way to keep the iron MC looking new? Is it worth spraying it with clear?

Anything else I should know? This is a 68 with manual drum/drum that I'm converting to manual disc/drum.

Thanks!

793401
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
157 Posts
It’s worth keeping it rust free, looks like crap fairly soon. Eastwood sells paint specifically for master cylinders.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
519 Posts
I used caliper paint on the master cylinder, got it from local auto parts store. Just make sure you clean it really well. I scrubbed with brake cleaner as a last step. Been almost 4 years now, still looks great.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
242 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'll check for the paint. I'm hoping it's a clear. The MC is brand new, still in the box. It looks great. Just want to preserve that.

To the other Q's... anybody know how long I should make the pushrod? And do I just insert it into the bore and it'll attach?

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
450 Posts
How long depends on where you want your pedals, that's why it's adjustable, make it so your brake pedal height is where it is supposed to be. Just push it in and it will be fine.
 
  • Like
Reactions: JEFFinOC

·
VMF Ambassador
Joined
·
6,949 Posts
You don't want to use a traditional clear, as brake fluid will melt it right off. But the Eastwood stuff or caliper paint should do you pretty good.

The pushrod should snap in place no problem. I've got the exact same one paired up with my '74 Mav MC. I started by setting it to the same length as the original pushrod, but left the nuts loose. Installed and then changed the length of the pushrod until I had taken nearly all - but not ALL - of the slack out of the pedal. You don't want to take all of the slack out so you get immediate stopping power the second you touch the pedal, as your brakes will drag. So just adjust it so you have a very small amount of pedal travel before the brakes come on. Easy to do by feel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,216 Posts
You want the pushrod short enough that so that the piston in the master cylinder will bottom before the pedal hits the floor. This is without fluid in the system. This is a critical safety issue. You don't ever want to end up without full travel in the master cylinder if there is a leak.

There's a metal clip that fits on the end of the pushrod. It should snap into a machined groove in the manual brake piston by simply pushing. It's very difficult to remove the pushrod after clipping together. You should have found a clip in the box of the new master cylinder along with the unusable long pushrod.


If your car is a stock manual brake car with the stock brake pedal there should be a limiting arm on the brake pedal. This prevents the pushrod from coming out of the master cylinder bore even if there is no clip. I've seen several versions of the clip and even a white plastic one.

My 1970 Ford manual lists a free height of 7.49" to 6.43" with 2.58" of pedal travel with manual brakes. So it looks like you have nearly an inch of range to set the pedal to your liking.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
242 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you Kelly! I really appreciate the detail. I don't have the original MC and pushrod so I'm starting from scratch.

Kinda figured the True Value clear paint wouldn't do it. I check out the Eastwood stuff. (y)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
242 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
You want the pushrod short enough that so that the piston in the master cylinder will bottom before the pedal hits the floor. This is without fluid in the system. This is a critical safety issue. You don't ever want to end up without full travel in the master cylinder if there is a leak.

There's a metal clip that fits on the end of the pushrod. It should snap into a machined groove in the manual brake piston by simply pushing. It's very difficult to remove the pushrod after clipping together. You should have found a clip in the box of the new master cylinder along with the unusable long pushrod.


If your car is a stock manual brake car with the stock brake pedal there should be a limiting arm on the brake pedal. This prevents the pushrod from coming out of the master cylinder bore even if there is no clip. I've seen several versions of the clip and even a white plastic one.

My 1970 Ford manual lists a free height of 7.49" to 6.43" with 2.58" of pedal travel with manual brakes. So it looks like you have nearly an inch of range to set the pedal to your liking.
Thanks Cougar70. So it sounds like I want to get the pushrod inserted into the MC, then get the pedal hanger assembly and the MC mounted up together, and then check to make sure I have full travel with the pushrod.

Currently, the car is dissassembled, I'll have to put all this in at the same time.

And I'm guessing this means I'll end up 'bench bleeding' the MC in the car? (I'm still waiting for my front disc brakes. They're backordered, like so many things these days).

BTW, yes it is a stock manual brakes car and the brake pedal does have the stop.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,216 Posts
Many people have success in bleeding brakes without bench bleeding. Some people say bench bleeding is necessary.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top