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I'm starting to do some body work on my 68 restomod. I'm almost finished mechanically. My quarters were pretty beat up in several spots with prior bondo work from an old Owner. I was going to fix it with plastic, but decided to try quarter skins instead. I received them from CJ (link below) and they look great, but I am unsure the best approach to install them. I was originally going to chop them up and patch pieces on my quarters, but I'm thinking of installing them as one piece. My buddy came over and said that they were overlays, but I think I need to cut out the old metal. Any advice?

MUSTANG QUARTER PANEL SKIN WITHOUT INDENT COUPE/CONVERTIBLE 1968
 

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Since they now make them, I would buy the whole quarter panels. This way you can head off the eventual cracking where the original seams were leaded to the car.

I asked the question on this forum why they cracked. The answers that I got said that since the seams were only spot welded it allowed too much movement, thus the cracking.

I know there are probably many vintage Mustangs on the road without any cracking with the original leaded panels. But, since you are getting the body work done then I would go the whole new quarter route.

You can use magnets, and small screws to align everything until you get everything welded.

Just be sure when you weld them to do a little at a time, not overheating the panels, until they are fulled welded. Then add the body filler of your choice.
 

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Unfortunately I already purchased these skins. Has anybody else installed just the skin? Thanks
 

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contrary to what your friend said, they are not overlays. nothing panel replacement related benefits from overlaying new metal directly over the old metal. if you have rust on the old metal and you overlay new metal over it you just multiplied the problem. moisture gets trapped between the panels and causes even more headaches. a lot of old school shops used to, and some still do, repair floor pans that way. by simply dropping a new floor pan directly on top of the damaged area and proceed to welding it in. most of those skins are designed to be welded in after you cut the original out and from the looks of the one you have it's designed to be welded in inboard of the top body line. a lot of people choose to weld them in about 1" below the top body line.
 

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I use Evercoat Panel adhesive when I install Quarter skin's. You can use a standard caulking gun and one Tube will do two panel's. It's faster than welding and the repair is strong and waterproof. I've been doing this for years with out any issue's. Even when you look in the Trunk you can hardly tell the panel was replaced. Here's some picture's of the basic procedure I use. There's a bit more to it but this will give you an idea how I do it.

Marty.











 

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Not trying to hijack the thread but i had some questions that might be useful to the OP.

Marty65,

Who do you get your skins from? also It looks like you used the tape as a guide to cut out the old. Did you have to cut or trim the replacement panel? Did it have a lip to wrap around the door jamb area?

I just took my quarter panels down to metal and from the looks of them I was thinking of doing a skin and using the same method. Yours look real nice!
 

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I had the skins I bought for my '66 and they were 1/4" too long. If I was willing to cut the back of the quarter off and overlap instead of wrapping around as the original did, I would have used them. I used one for a patch, and sold the other and bought a whole quarter and installed that.
That gluing on looks cool! I don't have the balls to attempt that though. I'm just old school and weld up everything. My luck the glue would set up before I got it in place.
 

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Here's some more detail. If your concerned about the Glue setting up on you,just get slower drying Glue. 90 minutes is plenty of time. I don't like to weld skin's because of the warping and I think it takes way to much time.
Golden Legion sheet metal is what I prefer. It seem's to fit the best.

I use 3/4" Tape for my cutting line. I use a standard cutting wheel. The thinner the wheel the better. I cut the top, front and rear of the quarter panel. I loosely cut around the lower rocker,wheel well and drop off.



When the panel is off, I remove the old spot welded metal from around the rocker,wheel well and drop off area. What you have now is a bonding strip.



Take the new skin and remove the flange from the front, top and rear. Take the skin and trial fit it to the the quarter area. You may have to modify the flange that sit's into the rocker area. I've had to re-bend that flange often. It may throw your skin alignment off. Make sure the wheel well area's fit. Use a Vise grip at the center of the wheel well area to help you steady the panel. Wear glove's, the metal will bite. I use sheet metal screw's at the front of the panel. Tape at the top and clamp's at the bottom. Practice until you get a routine going on installing the Skin. It'll get you familar when you do the actual install.

Once everything is fitted,remove the panel and prep the areas to be bonded. Keep the prep area on the skin about 3/4" wide at the top and side's. The same width at the bonding strip you made on the Mustang.Prep the area quarter area on the Mustang. The area must be clean.



The Glue will flow better if the tube is warmed up. If not, you will probably bend the Gun and your hand's will get tired real quick. You don't need that at this point. Use a slow drying adhesive. !!!!Read the instructions!!! Have all your clamps, vice grips,sheet metals screw's and tape ready at the Mustang.
When your ready to go, squeeze the first couple of inches of Glue on the Wheel well flange. This will purge the mixing tip of poorly mixed epoxy. With that done, just apply the glue on all the bonding area's as required.



Once you have applied a bead of glue to the bonding area's, take your panel and PLACE it onto the bonding area. Do not pull the panel off, but you can slide it. Use a vice grip to the center of the wheel well flange to help steady the panel. While keeping the panel flat with your hand, install your other clamping device's till the panel is in place, then finish installing the rest of the clamping device's onto the panel. If you find small air pocket's,fill them with the excess glue. Do not clamp down to hard. You don't want to squeeze out all the Glue. Use your finger to smooth out the glue at the rocker seam. If needed, add glue to fill gaps. This will give you a factory looking seam.
If you need to install more sheet metal screw's, go ahead and do it. Getting the panel flat is the goal here. Be flexable and do what's needed.



Give the adhesive a couple of day's to cure, then remove the clamping device's. Take a grinder and clean up all the edge's. Glue, overhanging metal,ect.



Counter sink the hole's you drilled for the sheet metal screw's. Then apply a skim coat of filler to square off the edge's and generally smooth out everything. Most new sheetmetal need's some body work to get them straight. Go into the trunk area to remove the "Bondo Worm's" that squeeze through the sheet metal hole's.



Apply primer and block out the panel. I use a high fill Epoxy primer.



Then of course prep for paint.



I did this on my own Mustang years ago. The repair has never failed or has given any indication of failing. No complaint's from the owner's who own Mustang's that I did this repair on..... and I've done plenty. No one can tell the panel was replaced until I tell them and they just about break their neck looking up in the Trunk to look for the bonding strip. I've also done this repair on floor board's. Do not used bonding adhesive on Structural Area's.

Marty.
 

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Marty, I gotta admit. That's a darn pretty job there; been debating bonding panels, but always thought it wouldn't hold up or look chincey. I stand corrected. Thoughts on flanging the bonding-surface at the mustang itself though? And got any photo's of those floorpans you were talking about?
 

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I have flanged patch panel's when bonding. Mostly on the lower Fender's and lower quarter patches. I see no reason to flange a Skin since the skin lay's flat onto the bonding strip right up to the crown of the original Quarter. There is more area to bond too this way, which give's you more strength. After the curing, all that you need to do is dress-up the edge's then finish with some filler.

The adding of the skin did not affect the quarter to door alignment. If it does, just adjust out the striker.

I need to add. When getting the panel to fit at the rocker area,you will have to notch the flange to clear the bonding strip.

I'll see if I can find a picture of a finished bodyline and the floor pan's.

Marty.
 

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that is a cool method. Would you say that is easier for the DIY kind of guy or is the slow and stead weld/cool/skip a head/weld/cool method?

I want easy, easy to make look good, and easy to fix after I mess it up cause I am 110% sure I am going to mess up.
 

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I like you and most of the Guy's on this Forum work out of their Garage's and have limited resource's and $$$$ to do some thing's required on your Mustang. I'm not the greatest Welder and I don't want to warp up or burn through a new Quarter skin, so I checked into the alternative of Bonding.

It is for the DIY guy. It's much easier than welding. It may take a little time at first but you will get the hang of it on your second panel. You will be nervous at first thinking the glue will harden up with in minute's, but it won't. Just keep focused. You can't screw up because you have already done dry run's on fitting the panel. The only differance will be the Glue.

Use the Evercoat Maxim #100816. About $30 for a 8.45 oz Tube. You have 90 to 110 minutes to work with it. It comes in a standard size tube so you can use a normal everyday caulking gun. No special Gun needed. Buy an extra mixing nozzel for the second panel.

This process is for the DIY'er in the real World, just don't over think it. You'll see.

Marty.
 

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I would think that the receiving edge would have to be flanged to get a smooth and thin body line and the top of the quarter. can you post up a few more pics of the body line?
How's this?













These last pictures are of my 1965 Mustang. The panel's were installed over 6 year's ago using the bonding adhesive. This Mustang has been driven on hundred's of miles on old Oklahoma road's and highway's. It has sit all day at Car Show's in over 100* Summer day's. There is no indication of stress cracking at the bonding area.







And a close up of the skin fastened to the bonding strip just after installation at the quarter window.



Still digging for the floor board shot's.

Marty.
 

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Heh, dang Marty; you made a believer out've me. I'll be looking into doing this when I get to my quarters; been dreading cutting the rot out and patching in/putting on full quarters, but that's so pretty I can't help but give it a shot. And for cheap, too!
 

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As a complete amateur I have welded on 4 pairs of quarters, both stitch butt joints and overlap welded. I have only glued on one set of quarters and that was on a 911 to flare for RS look. Marty has convinced me that I'll be using glue on my muscle car quarters from here on out including my current 67 project. Body work is less, and the glue is hard to believe in strength. You won't have any fear after using this stuff. I used the glue that NAPA sells where it requires the special gun, though they do rent this for free with glue purchase. I will try Marty's glue suggestions next time just because it allows more freedom in timing with 'typical' caulk gun style. Cost seems to be inline with what I used though.

Nice work and nice job presenting. To OP, YES this strategy looks faster and probably more predictable in end results. A warped panel is a pain in the ***** to fix.
 

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Thanks for posting those pictures. I am such a novice. How do you blend that so one doesn't see the lap? Bondo?
After the Adhesive has cured use a 40 grit sanding disc and square off the new panel. Then run the disc along the top of the panel to taper the new metal into the original body line.

Remove the E-Coat primer down about five inches or so on the panel. Once everything is trimmed run a piece of 3/4" masking tape and run it along the top of the body line. Keep the tape right at the edge. Apply a skim coat of Filler down the panel side. Don't forget to counter sink all sheet metal screw hole's. (I prefer Evercoat Rage Gold). Once the filler has gelled, pull the the tape. What you'll find is that the tape has made a nice straight crisp line at the top of the lap joint.

Let the filler cure,then sand to the contour of the panel.

Clean off the filler dust and then run a piece of tape along the edge of the filler you just sanded. Add a skim coat to the top of the quarter's edge. Let the filler gel, then pull the tape. The tape will prevent the excess filler from dripping onto your newly sanded filler and it will keep your body work straight.

Let the filler cure then level. Repeat as necessary.

Use masking tape anytime you need to keep a straight edge in your body work.

Marty.





 
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