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Hello. I'm looking into selling my 96 GT and purchasing a classic to make into my new project. Does anyone have any suggestions as far as year and model, or even some online resources I could look at for information? Any advice at all would be greatly appreciated.
 

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or even some online resources I could look at for information?
Look no further, you have found the best website for Vintage Mustangs.

How big of a project are you looing for? The main thing to look for is RUST! Look for rust on the floorpans, torque boxes, cowl (pour a bucket of water down the cowl vents. If it comes out of the car from the bottom that is good. This checks to see if the cowl is clogged and if the water goes straight to the floorpans), and rocker panels. These are some main rust spots.

As far as the year and model, what body style do you like? Coupe, fastback, or convertible?
 

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Hey Sean, you've found VMF, the best on-line Stang resourse available! You're off to a good start.

Regarding years: the 65-66 Mustang is the easiest and least expensive to restore, and as you go up in years availability of components gets tougher and more expensive. A coupe of just about any classic year will run you about half of what a fastback or convertible will.

However, the most important factor is that you've got to be in love with what your building. For example, if there's just something about that 69-70 fastback that floats your boat, then do it. Nothing worse than sinking a bunch of time and money into a resto, then discovering it's not what you really wanted.

As mentioned below, rust is the most critical factor in finding a project car. Do a search on VMF for lots of info on how to inspect an old stang for rust.

Good luck!
 

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Yeah TheDude is correct. Of course I would recommend a 66 coupe but I'm a little biased :). Just choose whatever body style you like and buy the best condition you can afford.
 

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wow, thats a loaded question. I would hang out here and just read all the posts that come around for a couple months, you will learn so much about everything.

as far as what year to buy, its really a matter of prefrence, but the 64-66 cars are by far the most prevelent (about a million and a half made, iirc) and they are very easy to get parts for. the 68 and up cars had a lot more government mandated saftey features in them, however.

as far as what to look for in a prospective car... if your selling a 96, you should have enough to purchase a rust free car. STAY AWAY FROM RUSTED CARS. some people will tell you that rusted cars are not a big deal, or rust free cars are too hard to find... these are (mostly) the people that have yet to restore a rusted out pile of [censored], and have no idea of the work involved. learn where the cars rust out so when you go to look at one you can see whats good/bad on it.

best of luck to you!

- Jason
 
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Thanks very much for all the quick advice. I feel like I'll be able to get alot of good information from here when I need it. As far as the body type, I'd really love a convertable, but that doesnt seem very practical to me for many reasons, so I'll probably be out looking for coupes. You all make the 65-66 seem really appealing, so that's where I'll start. This will be my project car, so I have no problem putting money into making it look and run nice, and I'll definitely be very wary of the rust issue. My late modal stang has a manual transmission, and I love it that way, but I have been told that a manual transmission on classics is more trouble than it's worth. Was this a misconception?
 

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Hello..make a sererate post out of opinions of a manual trans in a Mustang. The old ones here are really basica nd easy to fix.maybe a little more for the 4spd toploaders tho. Want to warn you about the rust again. You mention you"ll have plenty of money from the sale..well you will PAY plenty of money to have certain rust areas fixed if you cannot ddo the work yourselfmuch less if you have the buy the equipment to repair it yourself. Sobe very attentive to the rust issue. Lower body panels and door skins are cheap fixes, it is the rails and pans and into the trunk area to watch out for. Also don't get a 6cyl car and figure you'll make a 8cyl. The bottom line here is if you want an V8 Buy a V8 not a straight 6 and convert over. Last thing, just because you got a lot of replies talking of coupes if you prefer the otheer styles GET WHAT YOU LIKE..notthing less...
 

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The more headroom between what you pay for the restoration car and what its restored value is the better off you are. Reviewing www.nadaguides.com for classic car values tell you which cars are the best restoration candidates.
 

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I will repeat what everyone said about rust. If you hire someone to perform rust repair, the car will become a money pit like no other. You must find a rust free car. Here in Michigan (the rust belt), a quality shop will charge $1000 each for quarter panels. You could easily spend $10,000 or more on major rust repair. If you look at e-b^y, hemmings or trader-online, you will see plenty of nice cars that say '$25,000 spent on full restoration, sacrifice $18,000'. Don't let this happen to you....
 
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