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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When or why I should say, would you need an aftermarket fuel pump?

A buddy of mine and I were discussing the mach's engine plans, and drive duties, and he brought up the possiblity of a fuel pump.

Hes a Pontiac guy(68 firebird with a 428 + 5speed) running high 13s and for the record, i think I can take him /forums/images/icons/laugh.gif

anyway is it necessary for me to have a Fuel pump?
 

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<blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr>

anyway is it necessary for me to have a Fuel pump?

<hr></blockquote>

Yes, you have to have a fuel pump /forums/images/icons/smile.gif
 
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I wouldn't worry about it unless you are starving the car. How high do you rev it? If you are suck the bowls of the carb dry you need a pump otherwise don't sweat it.
 
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Wow, 450hp out of that clev, what have you done to it? Its got to be a real bear to drive with those narrow street tires!

I don't remember specifically, but the test was something like while you are already in the trottle to stomp it a few times in a row. If it falls on its face and then picks back up its the fuel pump not keeping up.
 

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I'm assuming you mean "aftermarket" in the Holley or Edelbrock sense, not in the local parts store "aftermarket" sense. I will call them "performance" pumps.

Performance pumps are necessary to deliver higher volumes of fuel. Typically, large displacements, blowers and high rpms applications. Stock fuel pumps will "cut out" at higher rpms because they cannot keep up with the fuel demands.

One school of thought says if an engine is developing x horsepower, then there is a corresponding amount of fuel it must be burning each minute to do so. For example, airplane pilots are trained in this manner so that they don't have to rely on their fuel gauges. Applying this thought process to your Mach, your fuel delivery (pump and carb) must be able to supply enough fuel to meet your horsepower output.

So then, the question becomes, what kinds of modifications do you have? IME, most cars can get by with stock fuel pumps no problem. Something else to consider, performance pumps will usually require the use of a pressure regulator, which to me means more complicated/unsightly plumbing, and more potential places for fuel leaks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Chris,

that is exactly what I was looking for/wondering.

applying that to my friends car the 68 firebird, his 428 is pretty much stock minus head porting and things of that nature.

I know what you mean on the plumbing ... he made his hoses/wiring for the pump look nice, but you know that certain things dont belong in certain places.

thank you for the post
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I bought a new Cleveland block, and am working on that little project.
but it includes

4v closed chamber heads - Manley Race Master valves
Crower- valve train
Crower- roller rockers
CAM - Crower 280DHP
Cranshaft - debating on remaning a stock crank, or buying a
Crower forged crank (too damn expensive /forums/images/icons/smile.gif
Rods - Eagle SRP sir rods, or reman'd stock connecting rods

Pistons - TRW

ARP bolts etc

Carb - Demon 750
Intake - Have a edelbrock performer... 4v definately changing
 

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I see what you doing to your engine, if you want a occassionally drag race your car, you'll be better of with
performance electric pump. As of the leaks, do not worry if you use EARL's or Aeroquip aircraft fittings you never have a problem.

I just bought from Summit fuel pump kit (SUM-PUMPKIT7A) for $260, includes all u need and is running as a charm.
 
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