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Discussion Starter #1
Was having problems bleeding rear brake lines/fluid was coming out of distribution block for rear b l's,however no air or fluid came out of primary rear line off of dis. block, so I removed this line.Can an air compressor be used to force air thru this line successfully, and clean out dirt, rust etc, or does anyone know of a better way of cleaning out this line? Thank's Alan
 

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If the line is in that bad of shape, I'd replace it.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank's Ken, but no, the line looks good,Alan
 

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You might try running a piece of wire (like baling wire) into it from each end to dislodge whatever is in there. you might also squirt penetrating oil in it and stand on end to get it to the point of blockage. I'd then blow fluid through with compressed air. That will clean out more debris than just air alone. If there is a lot of rust recovered, you might want to reconsider.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Sorry for asking Ken, but what is baling wire??Thank's, Alan
 

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I was raised on a farm, and it's the wire that held hay bales together. It's also what held most of our equipment together, and ALL of my car's exhaust system. You can get amazingly creative with baling wire, and it actually made great exhaust hangers. :: Just had to replace them every few years, as they had a tendency to rust away.....

You'll be glad to know there is no baling wire on my Mustang. At least, none that I can remember right off hand. Old habits are hard to break!
 
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I've used compressed air before....no problems. There is a cleaning solvent called Brake Cleaner ($3 at Pep Boys) that is an aerosol. I use this stuff on everything (careful though...it will strip paint!). It dissolves grease instantly and is alcohol based, so you can use it on anything greasy, watch the dirt and muck fall to the ground, and then the solvent eaporates. It comes with a long nozzle so you can pinpoint it into the brake line. Throw down a shop towel and see what comes out. Then use air to blow it out a little. There won't be any residue after you blow through the air since it evaporates so quickly.

The stuff is great. I never have less than 4 cans on the shelf.
 

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Brake fluid absorbs moisture like a sponge, chances are the outside of the line will look great but the inside is rusted shut, even if you run a wire through it and clear it temporarily, your problem will return. I suggest replacing it...
 
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