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Discussion Starter #1
I was helping my boss w/ his 1940 Caddy tonight and the car stalled on us repeatedly when in gear. It will idle like a dream, but once you take off, it chugs and dies.

The fuel filter, the old glass bowl type, is bubbling w/ tons of air - it looks like boiling gas! I'm a novice at best, so I'm wondering, is this normal? Or, is the car sucking air and then stalling?

Tomorrow morning we are going to the farm where it now sits (where it stalled) to work on it. Any suggestions?

The car also has an inline filter that is 1/2 gas, 1/2 air. It also has a sediment bowl between the two which we noticed is on backwards (the "out" side is towards the gas tank, the "in" toward the bowl fuel filter). Could that be problematic?

Thanks in advance for any help.

Doug

'66 signal flare red coupe with styled steel wheels
289 4bbl. w/ PS, PB, AC, white interior with a bench seat, deluxe seatbelt option, an extra seatbelt in the back for my three kids, and a tissue dispenser (good for an extra 15 HP!)
 

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If the fuel pump is working OK, it's probably a clogged pickup in the fuel tank or some blockage or a kink in a fuel line...

If the pump can't suck fuel, it finds some air to suck in through the path of least resistance....

That's my guess for a Friday night..*G*

Pat
http://www.jps.net/binay/webdocs/strtmstng002_sml.JPG
 
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While I'm no expert on those, I can say if something is on backwards, it may cause problems.
I would suggest you start with the obvious: Vacuum leaks,correct timing,proper carb adjustments.
When was the last time the car was run? Old gas would cause this problem also.
Good luck and post back-let us know how it turned out!

Was Bob Emmerich on old forum
 
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Thanks for the late night help! The father and son at the farm the car died at thought it was kinks in the line as well. Plus, there are 8 connections between the steel line coming from the tank and the fuel pump. And the fuel pump is working just fine.

Looks like I need to make sure there are no kinks and then start checking for leaks at those fittings. Can I eliminate the in-line filter and the sediment bowl? Also, should I use teflon on the threads of all the fittings?

Doug

'66 signal flare red coupe with styled steel wheels
289 4bbl. w/ PS, PB, AC, white interior with a bench seat, deluxe seatbelt option, an extra seatbelt in the back for my three kids, and a tissue dispenser (good for an extra 15 HP!)
 
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Discussion Starter #5
The car has been parked for about a year-and-a-half. It's probably not been down the road more than ten miles since then. We just spent a week getting the generator to charge (bad grounds, wrong battery, wrong cables for 6v positive ground system, etc.). Now that that's fixed, it's something else, of course!

What is the best way to test for leaks at gaskets, such as between the carb. and intake?

Thanks for the help!

Doug

'66 signal flare red coupe with styled steel wheels
289 4bbl. w/ PS, PB, AC, white interior with a bench seat, deluxe seatbelt option, an extra seatbelt in the back for my three kids, and a tissue dispenser (good for an extra 15 HP!)
 

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Usually an easy way to test for vacuum leaks in the carb and/or manifold gaskets is to carefully spray some WD 40 or carb cleaner on the chosen areas....

If the car is an inliner and the exhaust is on the same side, use WD 40 since carb cleaner is much more volitile....

When you spray, listen for the engine to speed up....that's because the spray gets sucked through a leak and gets burned in the engine.

RE: gas line stuff....siphon or drain out any old gas in the tank....disconnect the tank fuel line at the fuel pump and dump it into a bucket to check for flow...old vehicles usually had the gas tank higher than the fuel pump for a gravity flow.....see what gravity pushes out first...

Thread sealant....only use Teflon tape or paste on pipe thread fittings..... NPT..... and start a couple threads back from the end so you won't get debris inside the fitting...
Other fitting types are self-sealing and don't need a sealant

Visually inspect the fuel line, starting at the tank.....

Then, if possible, disconnect it at the tank and blow it out (disconnected at pump) with compressed air....direct end into bucket and see what comes out, if anything....

While you have the tank line off, put some new gas in the tank and see how it flows out of the line fitting.....

Hopefully I haven't led you down a dead end....maybe some others will offer more advice ....

This is just my instincts from some of the times I've had mysterious engine stoppages...

Pat
http://www.jps.net/binay/webdocs/strtmstng002_sml.JPG
 
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Discussion Starter #7
It's fixed. The '40 Caddy is up and running. The car had three filters, one of which was a sediment bowl. The glass bowl wasn't sealing anylonger to its base (which was above it). The design was pretty crappy--the bowl was pulled upward by a clamp that wasn't doing its job. Hence, air was entering the top of the sediment bowl and getting sucked right into the fuel filter which was about 1/2" away, in-line. As soon as we eliminated it, we lost all of our bubbles and we drove her home. Boy did we get some looks!

Thanks for your help. It's not a Mustang, but it's a true classic deserving of some TLC to keep her on the road (only 4,400 of the 60 Series were made).

Thanks from me and my boss.

Doug

'66 signal flare red coupe with styled steel wheels
289 4bbl. w/ PS, PB, AC, white interior with a bench seat, deluxe seatbelt option, an extra seatbelt in the back for my three kids, and a tissue dispenser (good for an extra 15 HP!)
 
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