Vintage Mustang Forums banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
950 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have searched and most of the threads are older. What are some of my current options for chemically stripping paint? I know Klean Strip has discontinued the more powerful formula. Is the newer version still effective?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,946 Posts
The good stuff is still available on eBay
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,277 Posts
Trust me...the new stuff absolutely sucks. Might as well as spit on the paint and then attack it with 80 grit discs. I've tried three different kinds of the new "environmentally safe" non-methylene-chloride formulas and they kinda work. I had to use a whole can of the Klean-Strip stripper to strip paint off of one headlight bucket. I guess it's "environmentally safe" if you have to use 4x as much chemical than you did before. Makes sense to me. I wonder if Mexico has switched over - I'm only a few miles from the border!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
383 Posts
You need to use the thick paste type of paint remover. Brush it on thick and goopy in one direction and do not touch it again or you will screw up the chemical process. Do not apply it out in the sun or it will evaporate before it can do its job. Do not apply it to a warm surface. None of the strippers remove layers of paint like they claim they will. Even back in the 1970s it took at least two coats to get down to metal on a single layer of paint. Then for some reason there were always little spots that no-matter how much stripper you put on those spots it had no effect on them.

Good chemical gloves are a must. Cheap gloves will just swell up and rip apart and then your hands will be on fire. I highly suggest eye protection. If you have ever gotten paint stripper in your eyes I can guarantee you won't mistake ever again. Do not use a wire wheel to remove the paint and with the stripper. It will fly far-far-away and remove paint off of the stuff you had no intentions of stripping.

Sandblasting if a horrific mess and it warps your sheet metal. I use it for engine compartments and floors but not on the sheet metal like fenders, doors, roofs and hoods. Thy are too easily warped, you will end up with a wavy pint job unless you do a lot of blocking and sanding. Do not use sandblasting on sheet metal except for around edges to remove the paint in the hard to get to spots. You also want to use it on any suface rusted spots to make sure you have gotten rid of it. Just think of it as cancer, leave one little rust cell and its going to come back. I will sandblast a fender in front where the headlight bucket cover up. The edge where it bolts to the inner fender. maybe the back section hidden behind the door. It works great for those kind of places and its fast.. But on the long flat surfaces of the panel not only will the air pressure warp the panels but the friction of the sand can creates a lot of heat and that can also warp the metal.

I use the paste type paint remover on th fragile sheet metal surfaces. The liquid stuff is useless on anythingm, I think it is one step above baby shampoo on a PH test. Let the paste sit and do its job, go to lunch. Comeback and scrape off what has bubbled up with a plutty knife being careful not to gouge your metal. If it does not come off easily don't fight it were going to get most of what was left off during round-two of the stripper. I don't brush it on as much as I dab it on to keep it nice and thick go. Sometimes I poor it on and just let it run across the surface and not touch it with any tool. That works the best but I go through a lot of stripper that way. After the second coat of paint remover has done all its going to scrape off the paint, plus use a medium steel wool to remove any residual paint and stripper off. Surprisingly a third coating of stripper usually does help remove more paint. Anything left is moving onto the next phase/ Clean off all paint remover stuff with a rag. Then take a Roloc metal conditioning disc and remove any stubborn sections of paint. Wipe the panel down with acetone until it there is no sign of anything but bare clean metal, blow it off with air. Your compressor can blow microscopic amounts of oil onto the metal so before your primer the metal wipe it down with wax and grease remover and then use a tack rag to remove any dust and prime it. The you can apply a phosphate coating to prevent the panel from flash rusting. Better yet just be prepared to prime the panel as soon as you have it stripped, not the same week, not the same day. As soon you have the metal clean. It will start rusting immediately when the oxygen contacts the metal. Its microscopic rust that you cannot see but year''s later could come back to haunt you. You cannot cut any corners doing a paint.

Do not strip paint unless you plan to phosphate coat it or primer it intermediately. Do not strip off more paint than you can put back in primer in the same day. That means spaying quality epoxy primer that we can later paint over. Not rattle can that will need to all be removed before its painted over You can always go back and grind off your good primer to do your body work and then prime over it again.The main thing is to not let that air get to your bare metal.

It takes lot of tools to do a paint job at home. Most importantly it takes a good compressor capable of keeping up with the CFM of the tools. Sandblasters take a lot of CFM unless your just working on little spots.
 

·
Just some guy
67 coupe, 69 Sportsroof, 86 hatchback
Joined
·
20,614 Posts
I don't really see myself walking into Home Depot and telling them I'm looking for "Thick Paste Paint Remover". Got a currently sold brand name?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
950 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the detailed write up. I do have one qt of the methylene chloride stripper, but that isn’t going to get me too far. Looks like I will be experimenting with a variety of things.

I should have plenty of compressor and maybe I’ll pony up for a blaster to get the nooks and crannies.

I have a variety of scrapers, disks and pads; respirator, eye protection, face shield, gloves, etc. I wish I had a heavy duty product. I may try a heat gun and razor blade scraper as well.

Plan is to do one area at a time then coat with Picklex 20. I am guessing it will take several weeks to get this completed due to limited time I can devote. It’s my understanding PickleX will protect for extended period, kill any microscopic rust and works well with SPI or Kirker.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,393 Posts
I just posted this in another thread. It’s about $40/gal minimum 5 gallon pail. I’ll try the new one when I strip my next project.

This will remove POR 15. Guaranteed. Almost instant removal.
B15 Metal Strippers, Semi-Paste Strippers - Benco Sales
B15 Metal Strippers, Semi-Paste Strippers- Industrial strength for professional applications delivering to business across the USA.
www.bencosales.com

Downside is you now need a business license to buy it. It’s mega hazardous, lethal in fact. And expensive. I’ve used it on powdercoat, POR, Steel-It and other coatings.

They just came out with this one.
B96 Eco-Friendly Strippers, Liquid Strippers, Metal Strippers - Benco Sales
B96 Eco-Friendly Strippers, Liquid Strippers, Metal Strippers- Industrial strength for professional applications delivering to business across the USA.
www.bencosales.com
My local rep says it works just like the MCL version but will take a couple minutes longer. Still corrosive and toxic. Check with the tech sheet of your primer to see if it’s compatible when you coat after using it. The MCL version above is safe for PPG, Tamco and Transtar primers at least. Haven’t used the newer version yet.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top