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Discussion Starter #1
I'm going to be tackling alignment on my 66 for the first time myself in a few weeks. Basically the entire front end has been redone so I'm starting from scratch. I was wondering how important it is to get each side exactly the same for caster and camber. If they don't have to be exactly the same, what's the tolerance for differences? The car will be street driven.
 

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Spammer Hammer
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I’d say get it as close as you can within the tolerances of the tools you are using. I do believe the shop manual defines the side to side allowances though.
 

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I did a DIY home alignment thread a few years ago. Unfortunately with the recent forum upgrades, the pictures are gone. Anyway the shop manual will be a great help explaining how the thickness of a shim relates to degrees of caster and camber. Not to mention setting toe and getting the steering wheel straight. It's really not that hard to do your own alignment.

Since it's your time, take your time and get it as close as possible, why not? I would say 1/4°. Just remember when the components are worn out, the differences are far greater!
 

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@Huskinhano I read your alignment thread a few months ago when I decided I was going to do it myself. It was a lot of help and convinced me to buy some tools to learn how to do it now. It's getting more difficult to find anyone who will add shims for alignment and I figure in 15 years it'll be even more difficult. But if I can learn to do it now I'll be able to do it then.

Thankfully this is all new SoT suspension so setting caster will be easier than normal. I was mostly wondering about camber since that might have to be "pretty close." In fact, it looks like my driver's side has positive camber right now so I'm going to have to modify that before I finish putting everything together. I'm trying to estimate the camber based on raising the LCA to about where it would be while the car is on the ground and checking the angle of the spindle. As long as I'm not too far off I can add some shims to get it properly aligned once everything is fully installed. I'm glad I checked now so I can push the SoT UCA heim joints in a little bit to get back to negative on that side.
 

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@66ryan I ran into something similar when I did mine. In my case I was going to keep my stock lower arms until I saved up to but the SoT lowers. I had positive caster initially. Believing my lower arms were in good shape I thought maybe my car was off. So I installed a Opentracker camber kit. After I had removed the lower arms I discovered the bushing were totally wasted. I still can't say if my car is off or what. Anyway now I have a huge range of adjustments with the camber kit
 

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"..... If they don't have to be exactly the same, what's the tolerance for differences? The car will be street driven.
that information is in your Ford published shop manual. If you don't have one, treat yourself to a fine Christmas present and buy it.

Available in CD and print formats, very inexpensive. Having one will save you time and $$$, over and over and over. Absolutely the best tool one must have to enjoy your classic to the fullest degree possible.


Z

PS The best alignment specs to shoot for are listed on the opentracker web site. Using them will make your car handle better vs. using the manual specifications.
 

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@66ryan I ran into something similar when I did mine. In my case I was going to keep my stock lower arms until I saved up to but the SoT lowers. I had positive caster initially. Believing my lower arms were in good shape I thought maybe my car was off. So I installed a Opentracker camber kit. After I had removed the lower arms I discovered the bushing were totally wasted. I still can't say if my car is off or what. Anyway now I have a huge range of adjustments with the camber kit
 

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Within 1/2* side-to-side for camber, 1/4* for caster with more caster on the right side only.
 

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Within 1/2* side-to-side for camber, 1/4* for caster with more caster on the right side only.
Agree with the more caster on the right side. This is because most roads are crowned (left side is higher than the right side for drainage. Now, if you are in the UK....
 

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Maybe the states out west are too cheap to put much of a crown on the highways, after all it does require a bit more paving material to get the crown.

In any case, setting both sides the same & as close to the ideal specification, for any given application whatever that might be, seems to make little to no difference in the car drifting away from the roadway center "out here" in the southwestern plains. ymmv.

What does matter to a substantial degree are worn out parts

Z
 

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@66ryan I ran into something similar when I did mine. In my case I was going to keep my stock lower arms until I saved up to but the SoT lowers. I had positive camber initially. Believing my lower arms were in good shape I thought maybe my car was off. So I installed a Opentracker camber kit. After I had removed the lower arms I discovered the bushing were totally wasted. I still can't say if my car is off or what. Anyway now I have a huge range of adjustments with the camber kit.
FIFY....... I believe you were wanting to say positive camber, not positive caster.

ex-Global West GM
1991-1995
 

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Hushkinhano all your photos and the procedure you wrote are gone with the old website? That's a real heart-breaker. I was looking forward to using that info at the start of the new year...
 
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