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My older son really loves his first car - the Emberglo 66 Mustang - and driving it here and there on little trips close to home since he has gotten his license is a thrill. He may get sent to the nearby market by his mother every couple of days, and he drives it just over a mile to school for football practice. These are nice trials before regular school starts and adult life later eclipses his youth. It's still scary to know he's driving on his own, but it helps that neighbors recognize the car and report seeing him driving so carefully, always signaling, etc. haha...
My younger son (12) can't wait until we can begin working on his Nighmist 66 Mustang that is waiting, slumbering since 1976, covered in the back yard. He wants to be involved in the projects we have left on his brother's car in the meantime. Soon, buddy. We'll start on the passenger floor pan and cowl repair on your car soon...
Before anyone is too critical of me of the indoctrination of my sons, I wish people knew how much I have enjoyed my Mustang and that I have always shared my car with my family and the joy I have taken in it rather than hoarding it and keeping the material thing all to myself as some people make their classics "off limits / don't ever touch Daddy's car" etc. The kids have always loved to go anywhere in it. Even the dog loves it. One of the neighbors sent me a picture of my older son's car yesterday, parked at the high school, and says there was a handful of kids walking around the car, just looking and commenting "wwwooooowwww....coooooolll..." One was saying how he wished his parents would have gotten him a cool old Mustang instead of a truck for a first vehicle.
Ladies and gentlemen, take your kids, your grand kids, your neighbors' kids for a ride around the block or wherever. Take them to a cruise in. Take them to a car show. ANY car show. Let them help you wash the car, even if you have to do their parts over haha! Teach them how to change the oil, a tire, a belt or hose. Teach them how to turn a wrench, to cut, weld, grind, sand, prime and paint. And let them choose their favorite kind of classic to grow up with. Even though a little nudge when you see an awesome Mustang doesn't hurt ! It's up to us to foster an interest in becoming the next caretakers of our cars. We can add 3-point belts, strap in the safety booster seats, keep some wet-wipes handy and clean the hand prints later. Lately, I've wondered if I could clear coat over my kids' hand prints and save them forever...they're growing up so fast...
Weather's gonna be nice today. Let's go for a drive.
 

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1967 Mustang coupe
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What a wonderful post. I bought my 67 couple with the hope to teach my kids to work on it. They're 5&7 now. But i admit I have a hard time with them breaking stuff. I feel like I need to get comfortable fixing it before I teach them, but your post reminds me that it's the shared experience that counts. Not the perfection.
I need to work on that. I bought it as a daily driver because I see them as things to be used. But I admit the dings and scratches of daily life will weigh on me. I'm working on that too.

Thanks for the share.
DrC
 

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You and me man, we’re carrying the torch. My daughter’s car is coming along. 18 more months to go! She can’t wait to drive, and it is such an important stage in a kid’s life to find that independence. It’s part their temperament and part sweat equity that will help their pride and joy old car be the character-shaping tool that it is for all of us.
 

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Thanks for sharing. I had a similar experience in my youth having a 68 Mustang Coupe as my first automobile and principle of means of transportation in high school through junior college. I learned a lot working on my daily driver and it for sure imprinted me with my passion for the classic Mustangs that I have today.
 

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My dad and I did exactly what you and your sons are doing with my coupe. Someday, I hope to do the same with my kids. That’s also the reason why I’ll never hesitate to let kids sit in my car at car shows or go for a ride.
 
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I won't ever forget my Dad helping me get the lid off the jelly-jar master cylinder the first time, breaking loose the leaf spring bolts, taking my car from my parking spot at school and puttiing it back with a receipt from Brown's Radiator Shop for a new radiator stuck into the horn ring. He told me I was "gonna wash the paint off that car..."
He pulled the coil wire off as a joke when I was gonna leave my wedding in it...
I won't forget my Mom buying me a dedicated wash bucket and good car wash soap so I wouldn't keep swiping her mop bucket and bath soap (dish liquid is a no-no!) She bought me a car cover. And she grinned like a kid at Christmas, giggled even, when she drove it a couple of times. I wish I had a way to take a picture but I'll just have to remember it. She's still a kid at heart.
 

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And she grinned like a kid at Christmas, giggled even, when she drove it a couple of times. I wish I had a way to take a picture but I'll just have to remember it. She's still a kid at heart.
ha ha....I remember driving Dad's old 62 Econoline and it dropped a u-joint. I called home to have Mom come pick me up. Dad had the family wagon so the only thing for her to drive was my 65 fastback. She grew up driving 3 On The Trees and was used to that easy shifting, low power 6 banger in the van. She had never driven a 4 speed or any clutch with much power and I was both grinning and cringing when I saw her at the light down the road. She had a moment of jerking, and then pushed the clutch back in and gave it the 289 the gas to get going and sent the right rear tire up in smoke. We were both laughing when she pulled up.
WOW! That was almost 45 years ago and she would have been a spritely young 35 or 36. She didn't seem that young at the time.
 

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Nice thread and posts! My son was never interested in cars very much before I started the mustang project, this despite my enthusiasm for the things. When my build was nearing completion though I think it suddenly dawned on him that it would be his someday. I've let him drive it and that changed his outlook too. Now he's asking questions and even following my posts and observing here at VMF (He initially joined VMF at my request to help answer some technical/computer related questions). But get this, being the techie type dude he is I have been informed of his future plans for my car once he has it. Complete changeover to electric. Yikes. :eek:
 

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Great post. I wish my dad is into cars and would have taught me how to fix a car. Your kids will remember this forever.
 

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I like to write short stories, this was is from March of 2017.

The Bustang​

I was headed out the door with a pocket full of Benjamins and visions of me in a beautiful white 1969 Porsche 911S - when I remembered to call the insurance company. The net of the conversation was; $110/month for the Porsche, $17/month for a Vintage Mustang. Fifteen minutes later I was hauling my Benjamins to meet a Powder Blue 1966 Mustang Fastback listed in the San Francisco Chronicle. It turns out that the car spent virtually all of its life within a hundred miles from its assembly plant in San Jose. It ended up following me home that very evening on my friend’s trailer.

Right smack in the center of the Dot.Com era, my new Startup was doing well and I was happily burning through piles of race compound tires (picture eraser on paper with super-glue grip on asphalt). I left rubber across Northern California including race tracks, autocrosses and the hills between Silicon Valley and the Marin County Coastline with my modestly steroidal creation. Then one fateful evening whilst playing guitar in a bluegrass jam, a blue-eyed beauty with a captivating smile joined me as a regular in the passenger seat.

Some 6 weeks later, she called in tears – the cops gave her a nasty ticket and towed her car away abandoning her in Palo Alto. With visions of a Knight-in-Shining-Armor, I mounted my mighty steed to rescue my damsel in distress. She was inconsolable as we sat parked on University Avenue with me stated over and over, “it’s just a ticket, we will get your car back” when she blurted: “I’m Pregnant”……….. 80512 miles, that’s what my odometer read as I stared in a complete stupor. I could hear her sobbing, see people walking in front of the car in my peripheral vision but all I could think was 80512 miles, that pretty low mileage for a car this old. A solid punch in the arm and emphatic “say something” broke the spell. I dropped her off at her house and said I needed to go for a thrash in the headlands and think. The drive however could be best characterized as a mundane mosey. When I came around one corner in the hills way above Palo Alto coasting about 20 mph, the road veered sharply to the right ahead of me. I could suddenly see all the way across the South bay at dusk with Silicon Valley below and a huge harvest moon sitting right smack on the hood of the Mustang – no-chit!!! At that very moment, a voice in my head delivered clarity; “you’re gonna be a Father”…

It wasn’t long before we were headed for Stanford Hospital with “water” soaking the passenger seat and subsequently baby-makes-3 living on a 36 foot sailboat on San Francisco Bay. You haven’t lived till you have experienced a 36 foot sailboat with a crying baby and a mother with a massive incision about to lose it with sleep deprivation. Soooo, baby went in the car seat, for it was time for what I thought was junior’s first Muscle Car 101 lesson. As soon as the vestige-of-my-first-mid-life-crisis sparked, my new son stopped crying and off we happily ventured into the headlands. We rumbled through the familiar Redwoods as I gingerly stroked the throttle, but as we got out toward Pescadero Beach some 45 minutes later, I forgot and totally laid into a series of my favorite corners punching wide open throttle out into a beautiful valley with an ear-to-ear grin when I remembered I was not alone. Days-old hands waved happily in the mirror as little Michael peered out the back window of the fastback at a world whirling by at 100 mph - with a deafening roar under his little seat. That was when I realized that this was his familiar world too having spent many hours in-vitro experiencing the sensations of a healthy V8. I smiled knowing he was certainly of my loins and we spent many subsequent days, and some very late nights (sigh) out in the headlands together that winter/spring.

Later that year my new Wife and I left our wedding in the Mustang with good wishes, bubbles and absolutely no gas or money only to return to the party 10 minutes later red faced. Michael spent many of his early years “helping” me with the “Bustang” and after moving to Upstate New York, it became our ritual to enjoy the first start together every spring with big smiles, head nods and high 5s. The increasingly Vintage Muscle car became a regular at Little League baseball games, local pools and other weekend activities. Two years ago he finally drove the Bustang through the back hills of Upstate New York with an ear-to-ear grin the entire time - especially when I told him to “light-it-up”…
 

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Great thread.
 
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1966 GT Fastback, 289, TKO 5-spd, EFI, 4-discs, TCP coilovers
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My older son really loves his first car - the Emberglo 66 Mustang - and driving it here and there on little trips close to home since he has gotten his license is a thrill. He may get sent to the nearby market by his mother every couple of days, and he drives it just over a mile to school for football practice. These are nice trials before regular school starts and adult life later eclipses his youth. It's still scary to know he's driving on his own, but it helps that neighbors recognize the car and report seeing him driving so carefully, always signaling, etc. haha...
My younger son (12) can't wait until we can begin working on his Nighmist 66 Mustang that is waiting, slumbering since 1976, covered in the back yard. He wants to be involved in the projects we have left on his brother's car in the meantime. Soon, buddy. We'll start on the passenger floor pan and cowl repair on your car soon...
Before anyone is too critical of me of the indoctrination of my sons, I wish people knew how much I have enjoyed my Mustang and that I have always shared my car with my family and the joy I have taken in it rather than hoarding it and keeping the material thing all to myself as some people make their classics "off limits / don't ever touch Daddy's car" etc. The kids have always loved to go anywhere in it. Even the dog loves it. One of the neighbors sent me a picture of my older son's car yesterday, parked at the high school, and says there was a handful of kids walking around the car, just looking and commenting "wwwooooowwww....coooooolll..." One was saying how he wished his parents would have gotten him a cool old Mustang instead of a truck for a first vehicle.
Ladies and gentlemen, take your kids, your grand kids, your neighbors' kids for a ride around the block or wherever. Take them to a cruise in. Take them to a car show. ANY car show. Let them help you wash the car, even if you have to do their parts over haha! Teach them how to change the oil, a tire, a belt or hose. Teach them how to turn a wrench, to cut, weld, grind, sand, prime and paint. And let them choose their favorite kind of classic to grow up with. Even though a little nudge when you see an awesome Mustang doesn't hurt ! It's up to us to foster an interest in becoming the next caretakers of our cars. We can add 3-point belts, strap in the safety booster seats, keep some wet-wipes handy and clean the hand prints later. Lately, I've wondered if I could clear coat over my kids' hand prints and save them forever...they're growing up so fast...
Weather's gonna be nice today. Let's go for a drive.
... But everything is temporary ...

And in this day and age, let's not forget about the girls ... my daughter absolutely loves our Mustang. She has learned a lot, talks like she is an expert, and has become quite an accomplished chrome / aluminum polisher. She has even been helpful! - while bleeding the brakes, she was the one who noticed the little persistent leak in the proportioning valve - I had completely missed it.

Imagine learning to drive stick (another soon-to-be lost art for the next generation) on a classic 60's muscle car.

Lilly and Stella 3.jpg Lilly and Stella.jpg 20190519_145423.jpg 20190519_145417.jpg
 

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So my dad calls and says he bought another Mustang (he already had a Frost Turquoise 6cyl '67 vert)... He had already looked at a '67 Hertz, but walked away. He excitedly told me about the new matching '67 coupe. "...and the 390, boy!" and he continued, "on the way back home I blew the doors off the ('80s Pontiac) Granville." Big deal. I replied dryly. "My '72 Impala could blow the doors off the Pontiac..." And I will always remember dad's quick reply: "Yeah, well now I can blow the doors off YOU!" :O

There are pictures of me helping dad restore the coupe and I still remember getting to drive it.

[fast forward]

Now it is my pride and joy and I made sure to take pictures of my son helping maintain the car and letting him drive her... ;)
 
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One of the biggest reasons I bought a Mustang was for the backseat, so my daughter could enjoy it with me. First mod was the 3-point seat belts. She loves gong for rides in it. My 15 year old nephew also enjoys rides in it and last year I took him to two car events at National’s Park. He and my daughter got to run the bases, take batting practice in the Nat’s (World Champion Nationals😎😎) batting cages and even meet Adam Eaton. I had plans to bring it to Children’s Hospital with some other car people, but sadly that’s not happening this year. I’m under no illusions that my daughter will be a gearhead like me, but she will know what cool is!
 

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I like to write short stories, this was is from March of 2017.

The Bustang​

Soooo, baby went in the car seat, for it was time for what I thought was junior’s first Muscle Car 101 lesson. As soon as the vestige-of-my-first-mid-life-crisis sparked, my new son stopped crying and off we happily ventured into the headlands. We rumbled through the familiar Redwoods as I gingerly stroked the throttle, but as we got out toward Pescadero Beach some 45 minutes later, I forgot and totally laid into a series of my favorite corners punching wide open throttle out into a beautiful valley with an ear-to-ear grin when I remembered I was not alone. Days-old hands waved happily in the mirror as little Michael peered out the back window of the fastback at a world whirling by at 100 mph - with a deafening roar under his little seat. That was when I realized that this was his familiar world too having spent many hours in-vitro experiencing the sensations of a healthy V8. I smiled knowing he was certainly of my loins and we spent many subsequent days, and some very late nights (sigh) out in the headlands together that winter/spring.
Great story and memories!
Takes me back to when my grandson was a baby. He was born in Oct and his first couple months were spent with my wife and I (parents were finishing remodel and her motherly instincts hadn't quite kicked in yet). He would get to crying and I would do stuff that would have parenting "experts" up in arms and calling social services. Biting cold temps and I had him bundled up in my left arm, steering my ATV with my right, bouncing through the woods over frozen ruts, sometimes navigating by the headlights. Many times I would pull back into the drive with him sound asleep, only to wake and start crying again when I shut the engine off.....another lap through the woods.
 

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This is a great thread! I didn't know/do much with cars when I was younger, but I've enjoyed learning - albeit at a later age. And my 20 year old daughter loves riding around with me in it too - another bonus!

I really enjoy taking it to shows or cruise-ins and letting kids or even young adults sit in it. It's a decent looking car, but not concourse or anything, so I get a kick out of letting them get in it, see how thin the steering wheel is, what manual steering feels like, etc., and watching some of them try to figure out how to operate the doors and window cranks. The vent windows are also a mystery to them LOL. One of my favorite recent memories was taking it to a friend's daughter's 15th birthday party and giving the kids and adults rides. The 15 year old walked up to it and couldn't figure out how to open the door. I remember her asking, "Do you just jump over the door like NASCAR or the Dukes of Hazzard?" That was even a little much for me, so before she could try to "jump" over, I showed her how to open it LOL.

This year with the pandemic, we've taken it to several birthday/special event parades, including one for a young man whose Make a Wish trip got canceled due to Covid, one for a man with late-stage cancer whose 12 year old son set up the parade for him for an early father's day parade (sadly, the father passed away a couple of weeks later just before father's day), and most-recently, for a local Pearl Harbor Survivor's 102nd birthday.

Making some really great memories...

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