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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

I have a couple questions about aluminum driveshafts. Do they make any difference in power? I have looked at the aluminum driveshaft from Mustangs Plus and was interested. I know places might advertise an increase in power to the rear wheels but is it true? Another question is would a carbon fiber driveshaft be better? I have read about them once before but never heard about anyone who makes them. They are supposed to be very strong and light. One last questions about the aluminum driveshaft, how much power can an aluminum driveshaft handle? I have a 289 currently but I will be putting in a 302 GT-40 crate engine from Ford (345 HP). Will it be able to handle it? Thank you for any help anyone can give me on these questions.

Stang6767
Bryan
 

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I don't see how it can put more power to the wheels. I suppose in a drag racing application where acceleration is the rule then maybe. But on a dynomometer I can't see it.

Maybe someone will help us here?

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Discussion Starter #3
Less rotating mass equals less power consumption in the driveline. Supposedly, they really smooth things out. The new LS1 cars have aluminum drivelines and those guys are putting 325+ HP to the ground right out of the box. I'd have full confidence that it could take grunt from a Motorsport 302. Carbon fiber shafts are a little extreeme. Especially for non-competition apps. But hey, if you are made of money why not /forums/images/icons/wink.gif

John

[color:blue]'68 Coupe
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Less parasitic loss throughout the driveline = more power to the wheels
Smoother = less shake
not to mention the appearance, etc.

I think the alum. shafts are being used on Fox Mustangs touching the 700hp mark without problems. Run a loop if you don't have a convertible. If you have to ask why not on a convertible then you don't have one /forums/images/icons/wink.gif

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Discussion Starter #5
I'm with you on this one roadracer. Lower mass will increase angular acceleration (really ought to be looking at moment of inertia not mass, but they're tied together), but once a body is in motion it tends to stay that way unless anything comes along. There won't be any power increase in a steady state situation, top speed for example. Aluminum may have some good damping qualities.

Ollie
 

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Mustangs Plus gets their alum driveshafts from Inland Empire Driveline. Check them out at iedls.com

Tracy Blackford
Corona, CA
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Repost:
I'm picking up the aluminum driveline I bought from Mustangs Plus from a driveline shop today. The driveshaft wasn't balanced as advertised. Instead of exchanging it for another driveline (which would probably be out of balance as well), I bit the bullet and had it balanced locally. They are damening it as well since Aluminum has the tendency to "sing" at high RPMs. I'd recommend buying the Ford Motorsport driveline for the late model, only $160, and having it shortened (I think its longer) and balanced. That will be about as expensive as the Mustang Plus driveline and you'll be sure its right.


Black primer 66 coupe, bench seat, 68 302-2V, C-4, 3.55 TSD
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I bought mine from Inland Empire Driveline (www.iedls.com) and am pretty happy with the results...and the peace of mind having a new drivetrain. I don't really feel any difference in accelleration and I doubt you will either...but it's a time honored fact that if you reduce the weight (given a constant diameter) of a rotating mass that it will have less inertia and will be easier to start and stop. I also increased diameter to 4" when I went to the aluminum shaft which probably eliminated any inertia advantage. I haven't weighed either shaft and done the inertia calculation...but the math is easy enough if you're into it.
 

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Ollie,

I too remember Newtons second law and feel many times "power" is confused with acceleration. Theoretically, if an aluminum D/S produced more power then we should see more torque at a steady rpm (I don't think so!) If this logic holds then we should be reducing the rotating mass of everything from the crankshaft back. Or we could say a lighter car can achieve a higher top speed than a heavier one. Sure, in a measured 1/4 mi where ACCELERATION is being measured but not so on the Bonneville salt flats.

I'll bet we'll never see a DYNO test that validates an aluminum driveshaft generates more "power" (horsepower) although it probably does offer some nice dampning characteristics.

Thanks for the post, I still don't buy the marketing hype but for some reason think an aluminum driveshaft WOULD BE COOL AND I'D LIKE TO HAVE ONE ANYWAY!

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"If you're under control you're not going fast enough"
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Discussion Starter #10
hey 66benchcoupe.
What do Mustang Plus tell you about the shaft being unbalanced?
I'm surprised they didn't exchange it.
I've always had great experience with them.


Drew
66' 289 2v, C-4, bench and a/c
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I didn't talk to 'em. I figured the odds would be that I would exchange it and have the same problem. It was more convenient for me to have it balanced locally.

Black primer 66 coupe, bench seat, 302, C-4, 3.55 TSD.
879 posts as "66 bench-coupe" on old VMF.
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