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Discussion Starter #1
I'm looking for a 4 wheel disc, Manual(NON-POWER), aluminum master cylinder I can pick up at auto zone or the junkyard for my 65. I would like the newer style see through reservoir. If searching has led me to the right conclusion I want 15/16 to 1" bore.

So far the closest I've found is a 2000 Ford Mustang(3.8L). $73, 1" bore, but ports on engine side and metric. Anyone have a closer match?

1985 Lincoln Town Car(5.0L) is very tempting, $14 for rebuilt!!!, 1" bore, SAE ports but engine side, stock look.
 

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I'm about to install a 15/16 bore from a SN95 Cobra (ports on engine side). I was using a 1" bore and it worked well however it required a fair bit of pedal pressure to lock the wheels.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
What caliper piston area are you running front and rear?

Where I am at...
(Per side) ------ Front --------------------- Rear
Pads ------------ 2 @ 1.8 x 4.85 ---------- 2 @ 1.17 x 4.52
T Pad Area ----- 17.46 -------------------- 10.58
Caliper pistons - 4 @ 1.625” dia --------- 1 @ 1.965 dia
T piston Area -- 8.30 ---------------------- 3.03
Disc ------------ 11.25 x .820 ventilated - 11.25 x .585 solid

The rear uses so much less fluid it makes me wonder if I even need to change from my current master cylinder?
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Pirate4x4.Com - The largest off roading website in the world.

A very nice writeup. Still trying to work out the clamping force of calipers with pistons on 1 side vs pistons on both sides.

Also has a neat excel file, fill in your info and find out where you stand. With my 4 wheel disc setup, stock 1967 front disc 1" MC, stock 65 manual drum pedal I would have stiff brakes compared to a new vehicle, but no Herculean effort required. Can handle a couple hard, high speed stops before heat should be an issue. Good.
 

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I have a brand new in box aluminum master cylinder for the 1984-1986 Mustan SVO's. They are capable of suppling 4 wheel discs but are not see through. I prefer them to the seperate reserviour type as they can develop leaks. Let me know if you want it, as I did not use it for my project and it is just taking up space.

Chris
757-647-1567
 

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Let me know how the 1" and the 15/16" feels..

I have power brakes, but I used a 1 1/16 (I believe?) V6 SN95. Very firm pedal and I can't lock up the wheels.. This is using SN95 rear discs as well.. I might go down to 15/16, but I don't want too much travel so my pedal hits the floor!
 

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James - you converted over to alum MC and kept your stock junction block? Looks good in photos, where did you get the metric to standard adapters? I know this has been discussed here before but I cant seem to find the thread.
 

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You can convert a M/C with metric bubble fittings to standard SAE fittings with adapters made by Edelman. They are usually available in CarQuest as well as other auto parts stores.
Plews Edelmann
 

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Those are some pretty lines, does anyone make a kit that runs from the stock prop block to the inboard side of the MC as shown here?

http://www.midnightdsigns.com/james/images/2000MC.jpg
 

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Will using the 2000 mustang master cylinder, help with pedal feel? I'm running the stock cast iron dual master cylinder on my 65.

I too was planning on going with a later model master cylinder, but I messed up and pulled one of a '90 mustang 5.0, with rear drum. I need one for rear disks.

I'm thinking that the sn95 would work aswell, with its combination valve, Also will help in the advent of break pressure loss, you will still have brakes do to the safety check valve in the combination valve. But im assuming the 2000 v6 mustang would use the 2 piston front calipers, which would require more volume of brake fluid, as necessary for the 4 piston factory kelsey-hayes on 65. This is probably the route I must go.

TO BAD I PULLED THE WRONG DAMN MC AND DISTRIBUTION BLOCK!
 

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I just bought a 18" tube that already had the bubble flare, cut it and bent it to shape, then inverted flared the other end. I bent all those lines using a three dollar bending from Harbor Freight.
 

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so the 2000 v6 mustang master cylinder is just bolt on procedure? correct? how about the push rod that hooks up the pedal? do we use the original, or do we need to buy a special one?
 

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For those that know (please educate me if I'm wrong), what exactly is different in the M/C between the disc/disc and disc/drum? Some of the disc/drum M/Cs have a residual valve that can be removed, in which it then can be used on a disc/disc setup with an adjustable proportioning valve.

Too many people get caught up on the M/C bowl size. These calipers pistons don't use that much fluid people once bled. Once you fill the M/C and bleed your brakes, the pistons don't move but maybe hundreths or a tenth of an inch. Leave the cap off the M/C and have someone press on the brakes, and you'll see that the fluid level doesn't even drop (to the human eye). The reason for the larger bowls for the disc setup is that as the brake pads wear, the piston extends out further and sucks more fluid into the piston. The capacity of the bowl is directly related to the volume needed with the pistons fully extended. If you keep up on your brake fluid level (pads don't wear that quickly unless you are on the track!), you shouldn't need that large of a bowl. This is for weekend cruisers, not daily drivers.

The M/C bore determines the pedal travel and the pedal effort, simple hydraulics. So unless I'm missing something, as long as you remove the residual valve (if equipped) you can use any M/C with a disc/disc setup and the stock proportioning valve replaced with an adjustable prop valve.
 
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