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1966 Mustang GT 4sp Nightmist Blue
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Good Evening Everyone!!

So I am in the process of doing quite a bit to the Mustang(installing a 9" and the Edelbrock ProFlo4, already did SOT front end). Everything I am doing I am doing my best not to drill any new holes or disturb whats there.

If this website is correct, 1966 Mustang Production Numbers , about 25k 1966 Mustangs were GTs, most being fastbacks, then coupes and then convertibles. As I have been working on her, I found some of the original primer and as you can see in the pics she is a clean car. My thought is I don't want to go nuts "restoring" it as you lose whats original and we know its really hard to prove a Mustang is a GT. So am I ok thinking of just leaving whats there, there? And replacing, restoring(paint, interior) as needed?

Inevitably this car will go to my son and he can do what he pleases, just trying to keep in tact what is real and not reproduced or fake.

Chris

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Good Evening Everyone!!

So I am in the process of doing quite a bit to the Mustang(installing a 9" and the Edelbrock ProFlo4, already did SOT front end). Everything I am doing I am doing my best not to drill any new holes or disturb whats there.

If this website is correct, 1966 Mustang Production Numbers , about 25k 1966 Mustangs were GTs, most being fastbacks, then coupes and then convertibles. As I have been working on her, I found some of the original primer and as you can see in the pics she is a clean car. My thought is I don't want to go nuts "restoring" it as you lose whats original and we know its really hard to prove a Mustang is a GT. So am I ok thinking of just leaving whats there, there? And replacing, restoring(paint, interior) as needed?

Inevitably this car will go to my son and he can do what he pleases, just trying to keep in tact what is real and not reproduced or fake.

Chris

View attachment 756272 View attachment 756273 View attachment 756274 View attachment 756275
I wouldn’t worry about originality, you’re already making the car your own. Fix and protect what’s needed, and continue to make the car your own.

Are you crazy?


Sent from the interwebs... where else?
 

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The factory primer can be reproduced as well if you wanna clean it all up and go with that "day one" look.
 

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I would be more concerned with repairing any deterioration and protecting the car from any further deterioration. If original primer, paint or parts are still doing their job, then leave them alone, if not, repair/replace as necessary.
 
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1966 GT Fastback, 289, TKO 5-spd, EFI, 4-discs, TCP coilovers
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Good Evening Everyone!!

So I am in the process of doing quite a bit to the Mustang(installing a 9" and the Edelbrock ProFlo4, already did SOT front end). Everything I am doing I am doing my best not to drill any new holes or disturb whats there.

If this website is correct, 1966 Mustang Production Numbers , about 25k 1966 Mustangs were GTs, most being fastbacks, then coupes and then convertibles. As I have been working on her, I found some of the original primer and as you can see in the pics she is a clean car. My thought is I don't want to go nuts "restoring" it as you lose whats original and we know its really hard to prove a Mustang is a GT. So am I ok thinking of just leaving whats there, there? And replacing, restoring(paint, interior) as needed?

Inevitably this car will go to my son and he can do what he pleases, just trying to keep in tact what is real and not reproduced or fake.

Chris

View attachment 756272 View attachment 756273 View attachment 756274 View attachment 756275
It looks like you have GT exhaust hangers there, Chris.

I have struggled mightily with this same "repair / restore" issue, and I have concluded that there three "levels" of renovation. The first two are obvious; 1) a true and exact restoration, using only stock components, NOS parts, factory correct materials, colors, etc, and 2) a full-on restomod, using whatever components you like that make it fun and enjoyable, never mind what the factory did. Personally, I don't see the point of doing a #1 - you have a "collector" show car when you are done, but would you ever drive it? Likewise, a #2 full resto can get out of hand, losing all semblance of originality and any of the "ambience" of a 60's vintage car. There's lots of these out there. The #3 restoration level I will call an "origo-mod", which is a little more subtle and requires judgment. In this case, you do your best to retain the original look and feel of the car, and incorporate modern components that add reliability and performance, but are not generally obvious to the eye. I think this is what you (and I) are attempting to achieve. You are obviously well beyond a #1 restoration - you've changed the car, so your choices are really #2 or #3, and it doesn't sound like you want #2.

So for your "origo-mod", I would suggest removing all that old liner material under the seats, reprime any bare or rusty spots with something (anything from POR 15 to Rustoleum), wash that area with soap and water (makes a huge difference in the interior smell), touch up any spots rubberized undercoating, and maybe even consider Dynamatting. (I actually used a sound deadener called NICO, which worked very well). These actions will increase both the enjoyment and the longevity of your car. All of this is not factory original, but when you put your reupholstered stock-looking seats back in, nobody will see or know what you did, and you will have retained respect for the original design.
 

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In regards to interior smell. As I pull panels off, I vacuum then wash everything that I can with soapy water. There is usually a bunch of dirt/dust/grime/insects/mice droppings/corrosion and who knows what else in these cars after 50+ years. I also let the interior air our as much as possible with a fan blowing.

In my 67 I have the speedo, glove box, heater, fresh air vents, ash tray, heater controls and radio bezel out. Under the dash is filthy. Ive been working on dirt and surface rust removal for over a month. Its looking much better and smelling much better.

Im replacing everything that I can. Firewall pad and underlayment mostly. Anything that can absorb and hold moisture is wore out after 50 years regardless of how it looks.
 

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I would at least clean all the grease and crud off under there. It will look a whole lot better and it will be a bit more enjoyable if you need to work on something later.

Whether you decide to preserve the original patina of the car or re-spray everything depends on what you plan to do with the car or what you just want to do.

On the other hand, you've already made some mechanical mods to it so why would it be important to preserve any of the original coatings and sealers which, in the case of seam sealers, are notorious for cracking and attracting rust.
 

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1966 Mustang GT 4sp Nightmist Blue
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Discussion Starter #8
Good Afternoon Everyone!!

Sorry I started the convo and have been relatively AWOL. I'm thinking my thoughts got a little lost in translation so let me see if this makes more sense. Anything can only be original once, thats it. So what I am going to do, is leave as much original unless something needs replacing, use OEM or concours correct where I can and then any modifications I do, will easily be reversible but also look period correct if that makes sense. The car will rarely see water outside of a wash or getting caught in a rain shower so I think Ill be ok.

Thank you as always for your input!!




I wouldn’t worry about originality, you’re already making the car your own. Fix and protect what’s needed, and continue to make the car your own.

Are you crazy?


Sent from the interwebs... where else?
I only worry about parts of the car that prove its a real GT, yes, I am making it my own without a doubt. :)

The factory primer can be reproduced as well if you wanna clean it all up and go with that "day one" look.
Right, It can but I think the originality is more convincing and cool IMO

I would be more concerned with repairing any deterioration and protecting the car from any further deterioration. If original primer, paint or parts are still doing their job, then leave them alone, if not, repair/replace as necessary.
(y)

It looks like you have GT exhaust hangers there, Chris.

I have struggled mightily with this same "repair / restore" issue, and I have concluded that there three "levels" of renovation. The first two are obvious; 1) a true and exact restoration, using only stock components, NOS parts, factory correct materials, colors, etc, and 2) a full-on restomod, using whatever components you like that make it fun and enjoyable, never mind what the factory did. Personally, I don't see the point of doing a #1 - you have a "collector" show car when you are done, but would you ever drive it? Likewise, a #2 full resto can get out of hand, losing all semblance of originality and any of the "ambience" of a 60's vintage car. There's lots of these out there. The #3 restoration level I will call an "origo-mod", which is a little more subtle and requires judgment. In this case, you do your best to retain the original look and feel of the car, and incorporate modern components that add reliability and performance, but are not generally obvious to the eye. I think this is what you (and I) are attempting to achieve. You are obviously well beyond a #1 restoration - you've changed the car, so your choices are really #2 or #3, and it doesn't sound like you want #2.

So for your "origo-mod", I would suggest removing all that old liner material under the seats, reprime any bare or rusty spots with something (anything from POR 15 to Rustoleum), wash that area with soap and water (makes a huge difference in the interior smell), touch up any spots rubberized undercoating, and maybe even consider Dynamatting. (I actually used a sound deadener called NICO, which worked very well). These actions will increase both the enjoyment and the longevity of your car. All of this is not factory original, but when you put your reupholstered stock-looking seats back in, nobody will see or know what you did, and you will have retained respect for the original design.
Yes I agree, I think we are on the exact same page!! Yes number 3 wins lol. I know 17's are not the right size, but the look is correct as are Torqs etc that give modern handling while keeping some semblance to the past.

I did wash everything with soap and water and everything so far that I thought might be rust, turned out to be 50 years of accumulated crud. I am spoiled how clean this car is. Everytime I wonder if 20k was too much, something shows up(like the floorpans) or a bolt lets go(rear leaf springs) like they were put on yesterday. The only part that gave me grief were some Monroe shocks that had a nut cross threaded on them and it took more than an hour to get one off. Other than that, every bolt looks like it was put there yesterday(outside of the stuff covered in undercoating lol)

I may put Dynamat or something similiar when I redo the cars interior but its old worn cool to me. :)

In regards to interior smell. As I pull panels off, I vacuum then wash everything that I can with soapy water. There is usually a bunch of dirt/dust/grime/insects/mice droppings/corrosion and who knows what else in these cars after 50+ years. I also let the interior air our as much as possible with a fan blowing.

In my 67 I have the speedo, glove box, heater, fresh air vents, ash tray, heater controls and radio bezel out. Under the dash is filthy. Ive been working on dirt and surface rust removal for over a month. Its looking much better and smelling much better.

Im replacing everything that I can. Firewall pad and underlayment mostly. Anything that can absorb and hold moisture is wore out after 50 years regardless of how it looks.
Yeah, Its crazy what accumulates over time right?? Ill probably do the same once I replace the interior, but for now I just cleaned everything as best I could, installed a new shelf panel(to replace the carpeting and speaker grills) and reassymbeled.

I would at least clean all the grease and crud off under there. It will look a whole lot better and it will be a bit more enjoyable if you need to work on something later.

Whether you decide to preserve the original patina of the car or re-spray everything depends on what you plan to do with the car or what you just want to do.

On the other hand, you've already made some mechanical mods to it so why would it be important to preserve any of the original coatings and sealers which, in the case of seam sealers, are notorious for cracking and attracting rust.
What do you think it the best way to remove it without damaging whats below that? The undercoating outside of where the pinon seal was leaking, is just hard and brownish. Im open to ideas and something to do this winter.

Thanks again everyone!!

Chris
 

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It's really a sliding scale, from all original to "what is that?!"
I've only changed what needed repair or wasn't up to the standard I wanted, and then installed the best replacement for the money while keeping the original look overall. Enjoy the journey, but don't obsess over the countless options as you'll lose your mind!
 

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1966 Mustang GT 4sp Nightmist Blue
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Discussion Starter #10
It's really a sliding scale, from all original to "what is that?!"
I've only changed what needed repair or wasn't up to the standard I wanted, and then installed the best replacement for the money while keeping the original look overall. Enjoy the journey, but don't obsess over the countless options as you'll lose your mind!
Very true, its easy to get lost in the minutia!

Chris
 
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