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Looking for anyone that may have experience on using the “true” braided hoses vs the slip over stainles braded kits. Trying to decide on direction: any comments welcome.
 

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Do you have a need for high performance hoses where the reliability is worth paying for?
Or are you a poseur who just wants to look like they spent a lot of money?
 

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Real braided lines are an investment - in time, patience, tools, and money. And blood. There are ways to cut down on the bleeding, but you will.

While the real stuff works as well as you would expect, allows for speedy parts swapping due to the threaded fittings, has higher burst rates and higher abrasion resistance, it's an expensive proposition.
 

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Looking for anyone that may have experience on using the “true” braided hoses vs the slip over stainles braded kits. Trying to decide on direction: any comments welcome.
My question is for what application? For brake lines, not for the do it yourselfer. You would want DOT approved lines for reliability and safety. That said, I have used products from Russell for both PS and FI fuel lines. Good products which worked good after some assembly experience which included bleeding. The cut ends of the hose are like needles, lot of them! Like everything, buy good quality hose and matching fittings, and you can do some types of hoses yourself. IMO, I would not bother with the slip over stainless braid, just for show not performance.
 

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I've never used the stainless woven covers because they usually come out looking like what they are, "covers." I've also used the real thing with good success, but I've finally evolved to using stock looking rubber hoses with Gates shrink to fit clamps on each end for the cleanest look. My local parts supplier lets me go to the back of the store and sort through the stock hose assortment until I find one that fits my application. Another good look is polished stainless steel tubing with rubber on each end, secured by the aforementioned shrink to fit clamps. Another reason I don't like the woven stainless hoses is that they are dirt and grease catchers that are hard to clean if they get dirty.
 

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I've never used the stainless woven covers because they usually come out looking like what they are, "covers." I've also used the real thing with good success, but I've finally evolved to using stock looking rubber hoses with Gates shrink to fit clamps on each end for the cleanest look. My local parts supplier lets me go to the back of the store and sort through the stock hose assortment until I find one that fits my application. Another good look is polished stainless steel tubing with rubber on each end, secured by the aforementioned shrink to fit clamps. Another reason I don't like the woven stainless hoses is that they are dirt and grease catchers that are hard to clean if they get dirty.
I've found av. little rubbing alcohol on rag cleans SSANhoses wellwithout affecting rubber. It evaporates quickly. Been doing this for 30 yrs. Taught to me by old Porsche mechanic .
 

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I had a brand new real braided SS high pressure PS host burst the first time I fired up the car. Had PS fluid all over the place. Just a warning to treat SS braided hoses like you would a plane rubber hose.
 
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