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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello fellow enthusiasts. I have a 65 coupe with what I believe to be the original engine. (Stamp says Febuary and owner card shows car was built in May. C5OE suggests its for a fairlane I believe, but based on posts out there it seems this isn't indicative the engine not being stock. I have all the receipts for work done on the car since 76 from the previous owner with no engine work on it... Ill know more when I get to pulling it out) I'm at a point where I have the time to do some real work on it. I plan to drop the C4 and replace it with a T5 (thanks scarlet-302), rebuild/upgrade the engine (it is eating oil as if there was a drought), and give it a much desired paint job.

More to the topic, I have been looking through the forum the past few days to try to find more on upgrading the 289. I have grown up doing rebuilds of ford and jeep, but never a V8... however with previous experience, fords manual, Tom Monroe's book How To Rebuild Your Small Block Ford, and general knowledge from college and work I'm confident in doing the rebuild, but when it comes to actual upgrades I'm at a bit of a loss. My mechanic friend gave me a list of parts but I'd like to know the why and what that means for modifying the rest of the engine. I currently use my stang as a daily driver so I'm looking at making it fun/sound nice without going crazy and staying under $5,000. Any pointers to threads/literature/general suggestions would be much appreciated. If any engine buffs are in the Pensacola area that's where Ill start the restoration when I move down in October.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Here's what was suggested:
Flat top pistons
Stock heads with three angle valve job and hardened seats
Retro fit roller cam with .530 and .510 lift split duration
Roller rockers
Matching springs for heads
Aluminum intake edelbrock performer rpm
Edelbrock 600 cfm carb with electric choke
Dual roller timing chain
 

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Your cam figures show lift, not duration. What is the duration at .050 and the lobe separation angle?
I would run a small Holley or summit carb over the edelbrock. Solely due to the Edelbrock having a small float bowl capacity and drying out over night.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the reply. Currently has just the stock, so duration around 292int, 265 exh right now with lift .230in, .237exh. I havent gotten any parts yet as I still have a couple months for the work to start, thats just the suggestion passed on from a friend, had to spend some time decoding it myself. Always have kept to stock, much easier to match part numbers than to figure out new specs, so now I'm in a whole new realm trying to upgrade.

I've also heard Edelbrock has tuning issues, just know its a respected company as I grew up in the SD area.
 

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The best upgrade you can do to a small block Ford is good heads. Here's a nice budget option:

https://www.skipwhiteperformance.co...190cc-aluminum-heads-60cc-nkb-ford-274_90210/

If you're doing a full rebuild I recommend building a stroker. The reason is that it won't cost that much more (might even be cheaper) and it's just that much easier to have the power you want with the street manors needed for a daily driver. Having built a 320rwhp 302 I have to admit I wish I built it almost exactly the same but as a 347.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/347ci-Ford...641091?hash=item4b3334bb83:g:bEEAAOSwi8VZV3uc

Bolt those together and then it's a matter of choosing the right cam for your needs.
 
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I have had my Holley 600 on my car for 36 years. I have rebuilt it once or twice after the car sat for extended periods and added electric choke. It's a nice choice for a 289.

The heads you may consider pocket porting the exhaust runners so that the openings match the gaskets. A few hours with a die grinder or Dremel tool will help them flow better.

Add headers, dual exhaust and X-pipe.

Cam choice will depend on your rear end ratio.

While having the head work done you may want to have threaded in rocker studs installed. With 65 heads, no need for guide plates.

I like a Melling high volume oil pump. (not high pressure)

Your builder's other suggestions seem solid.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the replies. I have started looking at doing a stroker. I've been reading the Wordwrench How to: How to Rebuild the Small-Block Ford and it gives some solid ideas for all levels of rebuilds. I was looking at a 331 as I've heard an original 289 might not withstand a 347 upgrade for long. Any suggestions on the kit? Ive heard Summits are pretty good all round. (still have to see if the bores will be within .040. not going to risk going to .060)

Also definitely leaning more towards the holly.
 

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you've heard wrong

Lvly,


don't know what you heard or where, but your 289 block would be just fine as a 347, the block really doesn't care. If you do a 347 and use 5.4 inch long rods, you'll be fine. Also, there is no reason to fear going to .060 if that is what your block needs. Before I retired, engines were my job. If you want to use your orginal heads, you can, but you should upgrade the valves and seats. I can give you part numbers if yuou like. LSG
 

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Just curios, why do you want to use your stock block? Of all the parts you have, it has the least value. I sold a 289 crank, rods and pistons for $150. I couldn't sell the block for $50, ended up scrapping it. You can buy machined stroker blocks, then you don't even have to worry about picking a local machine shop that will probably keep your parts for a year and ultimately screw you over.

https://www.summitracing.com/parts/dms-lvl20302040/overview/
https://www.summitracing.com/parts/dms-lvl20302030/overview/

I'd still shop the machine work locally but I think you'll find it's now probably more than that. You'll need to:

Deck/Surface
Clearance for stroker kit
Bore the cylinders
Align bore the mains
Hone with torque plate
Install cam bearing
Install freeze plugs
Install other fittings and plugs
 
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