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Going all black destroys the lines of the car. The matte/flat look seems to have passed by.

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67 coupe, 69 Sportsroof, 86 hatchback
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Having seen what they look like after a couple of years as a driver, not something I'd ever use. You can't wax or polish such paint and it's a pain to keep up. Ask any owner of a Mach One or something with a factory style blacked out hood.
 

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Matte paints the in thing now. Not just black or dark gray but also reds, orange, and blue. Some are slightly metallic too.
Bed liner paints are popular too but mostly on trucks and jeeps and such. Although I once saw a old chevelle painted with bed liner.
 

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Moldings and such can be done in satin powder coat. Here's my door handles done in black chrome powder. I don't think I would do a whole car in satin or flat, it's just too hard to clean.
 

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1966 Mustang Fastback
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I read this thread title and literally thought you were referring to painting your engine fan black. I was like, aren't most already black??? lol
 

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I love the aesthetic for a restomod build. I have a convertible build in progress where I powder coated all of the molding and stainless. The majority of my original pot metal pieces degassed too much in the oven, so I had to resort to paint for some items. However, reproduction pot metal parts appear to do much better surviving the oven.







 

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Not my bag baby.
 

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I love the aesthetic for a restomod build. I have a convertible build in progress where I powder coated all of the molding and stainless. The majority of my original pot metal pieces degassed too much in the oven, so I had to resort to paint for some items. However, reproduction pot metal parts appear to do much better surviving the oven.







I’m very interested to see what this will look like on the car
 

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Oooh. I really like that.
What about bumpers?
Would the chrome have to removed before painting?
I bead blasted the chrome handles to give it some "tooth" so the powder would have something to stick to. I've had other chromed stuff chemically stripped of the chrome before powder coat, but I don't think it's necessary. It will take a medium to large oven to powder coat a bumper, a little beyond my capabilities.
 

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Powder Coat Build Thread

Attached is a link to my build thread which details some of the tests and processes that I went through to powder coat my trim and molding. Generally, all chrome is media blasted and stripped down to the copper. On pot metal, I discovered it is best to do a pass of powdercoat primer, sand, and then apply the color top coat. However, some pot metal will degas in the oven and never render good results.

Powder Coat Page 1

https://forums.vintage-mustang.com/9506457-post173.html

https://forums.vintage-mustang.com/build-forum/1049281-1966-mustang-convertible-restomod-coyote-build-12.html



 

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Attached is a link to my build thread which details some of the tests and processes that I went through to powder coat my trim and molding. Generally, all chrome is media blasted and stripped down to the copper. On pot metal, I discovered it is best to do a pass of powdercoat primer, sand, and then apply the color top coat. However, some pot metal will degas in the oven and never render good results.

Powder Coat Page 1

https://forums.vintage-mustang.com/9506457-post173.html

https://forums.vintage-mustang.com/build-forum/1049281-1966-mustang-convertible-restomod-coyote-build-12.html












Been watching that build thread and that blacked out trim looks really good along with the smoked glass. That is definitely how I want to do mine. I have been over the chrome thing for a long time. GM cars had chrome or black ignition lock cylinders. The first time you get in the car and try to start it and burn your fingers you get on the dechroming bug really fast.
 

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Attached is a link to my build thread which details some of the tests and processes that I went through to powder coat my trim and molding. Generally, all chrome is media blasted and stripped down to the copper. On pot metal, I discovered it is best to do a pass of powdercoat primer, sand, and then apply the color top coat. However, some pot metal will degas in the oven and never render good results.

Powder Coat Page 1

https://forums.vintage-mustang.com/9506457-post173.html

https://forums.vintage-mustang.com/build-forum/1049281-1966-mustang-convertible-restomod-coyote-build-12.html
Did you preheat the metal prior to powder coating? I always preheat used parts, usually at 400º for 30 minutes. It will burn off any oils or impurities in the metal. After it cools, I then clean it with acetone and a lint free cloth. Then powder coat with your primer and top coats. The preheat out gasses so it doesn't show up in the final product.
 
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I like the satin look if done right. In the real world, if you get sap or a bird dropping on your satin finish paint and try to remove it you will be left with a shinny spot in the paint. I currently work in commercial woodwork supply and we basically use automotive grade finishes these days. Everything is either no orange peel super high gloss or satin finish right now. When we have an imperfection on a satin product we sand progressively to 4000 grit wet to get the satin look back. We have to also sand all adjoining panels in that field of view to maintain the proper look. You would have to wet sand the whole car with 4000 wet every time a bird flew over and the discs aren't cheap!
https://www.amazon.com/MIRKA-Abralon-Inch-Sanding-Discs/dp/B0147GRX4S
 
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