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Discussion Starter #1
I still have a small oil leak on the 408. It's comming from the front seal. This is pretty annoying to me, since the only part under my hood that isn't new is the harmonic balancer (it was used, but balanced with my engine).

Just idling in the garage, there's no leak, but if I go run it hard down the street and back, it will drip about 2-3 drops after she's been shut down and sat for about 10 minutes.

So I'm thinking I'll just pull the dampner, and put the "Sleeve 'N Seal" sleeve on it and put it back in and see if that fixes the problem.

I hate to tear the front of the engine back off for a tiny little leak like this, but I don't like driving it like this, and want it fixed before Knotts.

Any reason that anyone can think of for NOT doing this? If it still leaks afterwards, I'll rip the front back off, but I'd rather be spending my time on the body in hopes of having it painted before Knotts.
 

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John I tried one of those sleeves one time on a SB Chevy I had in my circle track car.Never had any luck with it. The problem I think is that when you install one of those the added thickness of the sleeve pushes the seal out to far. I could be wrong but after that did not work I replaced the balancer and that ended my leak. If you have a wear mark around the balancer I would replace it. A good machine shop should be able to check the balance on a new one for you. If you do not have a wear mark around the balancer you will have to replace the seal. Check your timing cover also. Some of the newer ones you can replace the seal without pulling the timing cover. Good Luck
 

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I think that the sleeve is for repairing any groves that may form on your balancer. If you have a grove or a nick on your balancer then it has probably nicked the seal and therefore the seal will need to be replaced also.

I have used this in the past with no problem to fix the seal surface on the harmonic balancer and I also replaced the seal at the same time.

If it was me I would probably replace the seal and inspect your balancer and repair it with the sleeve if necessary. Since you had your engine balanced with this balancer I would sick with it. A new balancer may put the engine out of balance if your "old" harmonic balancer was out of spec.
 

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Besides, once you get to the harmonic ballancer all that you have left is the water pump and the timing cover, assuming that your 408 is a stroked 351W.
 

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These are an industry acceptable repair for grooved or nicked harmonic balancer seal surfaces and work great when installed correctly. They must be pressed on evenly with a skim of locktight between the balncer and sleave. No wrinkles are aloud. A thin skim of greese to lubercate the surfaces between the seal and the sleeve. Make sure when installing the seal lip does'nt fold in. ;)
 

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Just as Wade B mentioned. I installed a sleeve for one of my goofy cars because the old sleave had a groove in it. I installed the new one and some how managed not to wrinkle it and it did the job.

I had an 8.8 rear which had a grooved yoke and the shop installed a sleeve and it didn't drip at all afterwards.

It's worth a shot - and like everyone else says, replace the front seal. Hopefully you have the later style timing cover which has the seal which installs from the front of the cover.

Dean T

Dean T
 

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.... This is pretty annoying to me....
If it still leaks afterwards, I'll rip the front back off....
You answered your own question. Logic would dictate that if you already are thinking you have enough time to do it twice, you have the time to do it right the first time.

Cry only once.
 

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John,

If the seal leaks, it needs replaced. If the shaft it runs on has a groove, a sleeve works great! I put one on my car about 70,000 miles ago, and it hasn't leaked a drop since then. The thickness is about like aluminum foil, thus is negligible. However, it is made from very stout material. Just make sure you have the shaft de-burred and smooth so it can slide on without hanging up.

The reason most of the front seals leak (if there isn't a groove in the balancer) is because the seal wasn't centered in the first place. There is enough movement just in the cover bolt holes that will throw it off enough to leak. That's why it's tough to replace a timing chain, etc., without pulling the pan too. Those "half gasket" kits make it nearly impossible to get the seal perfectly centered, when the pan gasket is pushing on it. It can be done, but depends as much on luck as skill. They do make a tool for centering the seals, but I've never even seen one, though it would make a lot of sense to have one if a guy did this kind of thing a lot.

Good Luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
That's part of the annoyance, is that I did put the balancer on, before putting the timing chain cover bolts in, or the oil pan on (on the engine stand). I didn't notice any groove on the balancer at the time, but apparently I didn't look close enough.
 

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Remove the balancer first and inspect for grooves. While it is out, check the front seal to see if it is pressed all the way into the timing cover. It's possible that the new seal is faulty and not necessarily installed incorrectly.
 

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Did you use the oil slinger behind the t-chain cover?
I had a pesky leak and this solved it. Machine shop did not reinstall it. I now some t-chain gears are thicker and may not allow fitment. and some people say toss it, but my last 351 needed it with a cloyes double roller.
Just a thought
 
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