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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is for the rear axle on my Mach 1. Aside from putting lots of heat on it are there any other ways to remove the broken stud?

Thanks
 

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Bang it out the back of the axle with a hammer.
 

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There's not a lot of science involved with this one. As previously replied, just bang it out with a hammer. When unstalling the new one, set it into place on the backside and then use an open lug nut to "pull" the new stud into the axle flange.

Dave
 

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I wouldn't pound it out of there while it's still in the car.

Pull the axle and set it up where the flange is supported with a large socket in the vicinity behind the stud.

If you don't do this, you can warp the flange and all of a sudden have a vibration you don't want.

:p
 

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roadracer said:
I wouldn't pound it out of there while it's still in the car.

Pull the axle and set it up where the flange is supported with a large socket in the vicinity behind the stud.

If you don't do this, you can warp the flange and all of a sudden have a vibration you don't want.

:p
I totally agree. In addition to that, your axle bearing is taking all the pounding, and it's not good for the bearing.

It's also extremely difficult to pull a stud all the way through with a lug nut. Failure to get it seated all the way risks having it spin out in it's bore, and you pretty much have to destroy the wheel to remove it if that happens. It's very easy to pound a stud in from the back side, but difficult to "pull it through" from the front side.

If you attempt to pull it through with a lug nut, at least do it with a nut that you don't care about, as you'll probably destroy it in the process.
 

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When installing the new one, set it into place on the backside and then use an open lug nut to "pull" the new stud into the axle flange.
This has been mentioned before and a couple people very strongly cautioned against doing this. They experienced lug failures due to the studs being overstressed from tightening the nut so much to pull it into the flange. My suggestion is if you're going to remove the axle from the car just take it to a shop to have the stud pressed out and the new one properly pressed in. If you want to try it yourself you might be able make a ball joint press do the job (looks like a giant C-clamp, and can be rented cheaply).
 

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Pull the axle and find someone with a press. Might as well change the axle bearings and seals while you are at it. Also, I know the front hubs had studs that were expanded with a special tool at the factory. The stud would insert into hub and then crowned (not the official term) so that the portion of the stud tha is through to the other side is expanded slightly so that it won't come back out. I think NPD sells the original studs, just keep that in mind when you are buying the studs. You want the generic replacement that will press in.
Good luck.
 

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very strongly cautioned against doing this.
Removing the axle (or hub), to easily "punch out" and then "pull through" a new wheel stud is, IMO, excessive lean towards the side of "overkill".

Dave
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for everyone's opinions. The irony of the whole thing is that I just had the axle out of the housing to replace the bearing and I forgot to tell the shop to press in a new stud...
 

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Gotta agree with Dave here, there aren't any more "stresses" being applied to the stud than when you tighten it with a wheel on....done this many times with no problems. Of course, if you have unlimited free time......
 

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I agree on pulling the stud in but not on knocking it out while in the axle housing
 

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How much room is there on the backside of the flange with an 8/9" axle? Could you put a socket behind the stud and use a c-clamp on the front or something if you're worried about smacking it with a hammer?
 

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I would worry about the sideways pressure on the bearing. Awfully easy to pull the axle. Loosen four bolts and it's out.
 

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malarson said:
Gotta agree with Dave here, there aren't any more "stresses" being applied to the stud than when you tighten it with a wheel on....done this many times with no problems. Of course, if you have unlimited free time......
If you torque your weels to well over 150 foot lbs., I agree ;)

Most of us torque our wheels to 75-85 ft. lbs. It will take MUCH more torque than that to seat a stud. I have had both the problem of destroying a lug nut, and the worse problem of not getting it fully seated and having the lug spin out in it's bore later with the wheel on.

For the 4 bolts to remove the axle, it simply is not worth the risks of trying to pound a stud out and draw one back in.
 

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Random question, how much did getting the bearings replaced cost in the end? I just want a general idea...
 

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Mine cost about $60.00 per side. Includes bearing and machine shop cost to r&r bearing.
 
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