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I'm ready to break-in my flat tappet 289 and found much info on this site about the reformulation of oil to remove zinc. I used moly grease on the cam/lifters, put in the Crane pre-lube, and will use an oil primer.

I found www.zddplus.com as a possibility.

Anybody tried ZddPlus?

Greg
 

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Looks like a good alternative for when I run out of EOS
 

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I haven't tried it but thanks to your post and the scary text on the linked web page I just ordered 12 bottles -- $117.

There's no telling if any such product works, really, because I'm not convinced that every flat tappet cam is doomed to failure solely because of the lack of zinc and phosphorous in modern oils. If a cam would not have failed anyway, you can't know if this product made any difference. All you can know is, if you do have a cam failure while using this stuff you know this stuff did not prevent it.

Whatever. It can't do any harm, except the cost.
 

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Fear sells! :) I was just about ready to use good ole SL/SF motor oil and also read alarming text on this site and on the net. Guess it can't hurt and I am maybe a little too cautious about wiping my cam.

Greg
 

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It's my understanding that SJ and older grades have the full dose of zinc and phosphorous. It's SM and higher that is lacking.
 

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May be a good idea to buy some of those older bottles/cans of oil poeple sell at garage sales or swap meets .
 

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Although you do not want to run synthetic oil to break in an engine (piston rings), the Redline synthetic oil has a full complement of zinc in it. The company was able to keep the zinc because synthetic oils are governed by a different set of EPA standards than petroleum-based oil. Running Redline synthetic, you avoid the need for EOS or other additive.
 

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70sportsroof said:
Although you do not want to run synthetic oil to break in an engine (piston rings), the Redline synthetic oil has a full complement of zinc in it. The company was able to keep the zinc because synthetic oils are governed by a different set of EPA standards than petroleum-based oil. Running Redline synthetic, you avoid the need for EOS or other additive.
Mobil 1 15-50W also has the full load of zinc, ZDDP, etc. 1200 0r 1400 ppm (IIRC).

You can also use 4 oz ( or so ) of Comp Cams or Crane's break in additive with every oil change; it is loaded with zinc, etc.

Z. Ray
 

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http://www.bradpennracing.com/ 10W30 Racing Oil

BRAD PENN® Penn Grade 1® Racing Oils also contain highly effective detergent and dispersant additives to guarantee exceptional engine cleanliness as well as oxidation and foam inhibitors that offer protection against thermal degradation and air entrainment.

In addition to our unique base oil cut, increased concentration of “zinc” (zinc dialkyldithiophosphate a.k.a. ZDDP) provides outstanding anti-wear/anti-scuffing protection for engines employing either ‘flat tappet’ or roller cams. BRAD PENN® Penn Grade 1® Racing Oils have been evaluated by a number of premiere camshaft manufacturers with tremendous success. Many are now recommending our Penn Grade 1® racing oils to provide outstanding protection for their ‘flat tappet’ or roller cams.
http://www.bradpennracing.com/images/bottle3.gif
 

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This seemed like the most logical alternative to me. I'm using Valvoline 10W-30 racing oil in mine, with the zinc for older engines. But, I also have thought about simply using a bottle of break-in lube every oil change. But, this brings about another question to me also: Is there such a thing as too much zinc in the oil, and where do you cross that line? Tony
 
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