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This is the final saga of my door transfers, mounting the new ones on the car. Before i had all the windows and hardware in i was just messing around and put the door on the hinges to see how it lined up. I bottom of the door was "out", but other than that it sort of lined up well. since then ive changed the hinges and put all the stuff back into the door shell. Anyways to make a long story short, does anyone have any hints to make it easier to mount and align the new doors?

'66 coupe resto in progress... IT NEVER ENDS
 

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Here is what I did. First, take off the striker cause you do not want to line up the door when the striker uses the latch to pull the door into position. Cause then, the door really isn't lined up. ok, here goes.

Take a couple of paint mixing sticks, either one or two depending on the margin you want at the bottom of the door, and duct tape them to the door sill. Use as many as you need so that when you rest the body of the door on the paint sticks (not the edge of the outer skin, but the body/interior part) you get the margin you want at the bottom of the door. Next, duct tape a paint stick on the upright part of the door opening - the rear quarter upright area. Usually, you will have 1/4 inch there. You duct tape as many paint sticks as you need to make this 1/4 margin. That way you can bump the door back against the quarter panel area and it will hit the paint sticks and make a uniform vertical margin.

Now loosely bolt the hinges to the door (assuming the hinges are already bolted to the door opening/car frame, which is the bear part of bolting on the hinges) and also loosen the hinge bolts at the frame of the car also. This will allow you to twist the door so that it is in the same plane as the door openning. If things are really goofused, you can use a 2x4 and hammer to persuade the bottom of the door to bend in a little, if you need that to happen. Anyway, when you get the door how you like it, take a 1/8 inch drill bit and drill at least two holes through each hinge and through the door shell, each hinge and through the door frame/hinge mounting plates. These are locator holes. You can take the door off and reinstall it pretty quickly by lining up these holes using long finishing nails to get it close, then 1/8 inch rivets for a tight fit. When it is lined up, tighten the bolts and remove the rivets with diagonal pliers. It helps to have two people when installing the door. They are heavy and are not balanced to stay in place by themselves.

good luck.

sure it's fun (most of the time), but it's only a car.
 
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I don't know of an easy way as I've only done it once on my 70 Mach 1, and it wasn't easy. It took a lot of fussing around to get them aligned. Those doors are heavy. I think having a hydraulic floor jack to support the door while you are working, makes the job easier. After that it is just a matter of tightening the hinges in place and then checking on the alignment and repeating the same procedure, as you did when the doors were empty. You may need some shims on hand to add behind the hinges if necessary.

7TFord!
 

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Some times the door itself may have a twist in it. I had one Ford door that stuck out at the lower front corner and by the door handle but was in at the rear lower edge. I slapped it on another 'Stang and it was the same way.

That was fun trying to get it lined up best possible and get it so the window will seal and still roll up/down.

Some times, you just have to have a drink, even if you don't drink.

Regards,

Dean T

Shikatta Ga Nai - "It cannot be helped"
 
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