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Discussion Starter #1
I'm assuming I can fill, sand and repaint? Or is it better just to buy new pieces?

If I choose to restore, does anyone have a process to follow? I'm new to all of this but willing to learn.

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Are they fastback panels? If so I would just buy new ones and you can send those to me and Ill pay the shipping. LOL
 

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Back in the day, reproductions were not available for fastbacks and you had to restore the old panels. I personally think the originals look and fit better than the reproductions, so my take would be to restore the originals unless you have crakpcks or broken pieces.

If you do decide to restore the originals, you don’t want to sand these for fear of diminishing the texture on the panels. I used heavy duty easy off oven cleaner to strip the panels of old paint. Worked pretty well and didn’t damage the panels. Be sure to wash the panels multiple times after you strip them. You will want to make sure the panels are clean from any grease, oil or silicone spray like armor all before painting. These contaminants wreak havoc on paint and over time tends to soak into the Fiberglas. Use a good wax and grease remover on the panels once you’re sure you have them clean. Spray the paint in light coats to preserve the texture.
 

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They’re metal so just strip and re paint them they’ll look brand new even if you buy new ones you’ll still have to paint them so...
 

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They’re metal so just strip and re paint them they’ll look brand new even if you buy new ones you’ll still have to paint them so...
No, they're fiberglass. If you strip them, the stripper needs to be compatible with fiberglass. The Corvette folks know all about that.

The paint on them looks original. Thorough cleaning and a thin color coat will have them looking sharp.
 

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No, they're fiberglass. If you strip them, the stripper needs to be compatible with fiberglass. The Corvette folks know all about that.

The paint on them looks original. Thorough cleaning and a thin color coat will have them looking sharp.
Fiberglass? Mine on my 68’ are metal.
 

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Silly Putty.

For the old fiberglass with chips and crack, fix correctly (make sure the crack won't keep going (fix some the backside, fill with resin, fill chips with resin, etc) and as the resis is almost set, use silly putty to "copy" the grain, and LIGHTLY press it into the resin to somewhat duplicate the grain. when it is dry, LIGHTLY feather on primer to cover the resin, scratches, etc. using a primer that is close to the correct color, and then LIGHTLY repaint.

You do NOT want to have paint sags,as they will never sand out, and you do not want to fill in the grain with lots of paint.
 

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Looks like my 70 FB fiber glass. I repainted all my interrior panels with Accumatch paint, turned out great. You will have a problem with the texture if you sand and fill any scratches. You need to degrease then scuff panels with 3m red pad, then wipe down with acetone. All this is layed out in the accumatch litierature. I followed there procedure and results were great, dont forget the primer.
Mine had the wear through marks like yours on the edges where people went in and out of the back seat.

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Silly Putty.

For the old fiberglass with chips and crack, fix correctly (make sure the crack won't keep going (fix some the backside, fill with resin, fill chips with resin, etc) and as the resis is almost set, use silly putty to "copy" the grain, and LIGHTLY press it into the resin to somewhat duplicate the grain. when it is dry, LIGHTLY feather on primer to cover the resin, scratches, etc. using a primer that is close to the correct color, and then LIGHTLY repaint.

You do NOT want to have paint sags,as they will never sand out, and you do not want to fill in the grain with lots of paint.
This is a really interesting approach to reproduce the texture! There are 6x9 holes cut into mine... do you think it would be possible to patch the old 6x9 holes and replicate the texture with this approach?? I’d prefer to keep the original panels if possible...
 

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I have speaker holes in mine also. Has anyone cut a piece out of a another panel and made a patch??
 

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I had my body shop repaint mine and they came out great. I stayed away from reproductions because of expense and fit. Without a perfect fit it is a hassle to get screws to line up.
 

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I have speaker holes in mine also. Has anyone cut a piece out of a another panel and made a patch??
I had a big hole on the passenger side in mine. Not sure why it was in this spot, but I repaired it.
I used fiberglass to fix the hole. When it was done and sanded smooth, I used some spray can bed liner. I held it back so the droplets were a bit larger (practices a few times from various distances to get the pattern I wanted). Then I sanded it down a bit. Up close, it's not a perfect match to the original grain finish, but from a few feet away, you really can't tell. With my seats in the car, it's also not as visible of a spot as where your speaker holes probably are.

Here's a before & after shot.



 

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Discussion Starter #18
Back in the day, reproductions were not available for fastbacks and you had to restore the old panels. I personally think the originals look and fit better than the reproductions, so my take would be to restore the originals unless you have crakpcks or broken pieces.

If you do decide to restore the originals, you don’t want to sand these for fear of diminishing the texture on the panels. I used heavy duty easy off oven cleaner to strip the panels of old paint. Worked pretty well and didn’t damage the panels. Be sure to wash the panels multiple times after you strip them. You will want to make sure the panels are clean from any grease, oil or silicone spray like armor all before painting. These contaminants wreak havoc on paint and over time tends to soak into the Fiberglas. Use a good wax and grease remover on the panels once you’re sure you have them clean. Spray the paint in light coats to preserve the texture.
Thanks for the reply.

So do the following:
1. Easy Off Oven Cleaner
2. Wash Panels w/ water/dishsoap
3. Wax and Grease Remover
4. Fill/repair cracks
5. Paint?
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Looks like my 70 FB fiber glass. I repainted all my interrior panels with Accumatch paint, turned out great. You will have a problem with the texture if you sand and fill any scratches. You need to degrease then scuff panels with 3m red pad, then wipe down with acetone. All this is layed out in the accumatch litierature. I followed there procedure and results were great, dont forget the primer.
Mine had the wear through marks like yours on the edges where people went in and out of the back seat.

View attachment 748892 View attachment 748893
Looks Great! I'll look into that, thank you!
 

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I had a big hole on the passenger side in mine. Not sure why it was in this spot, but I repaired it.
I used fiberglass to fix the hole. When it was done and sanded smooth, I used some spray can bed liner. I held it back so the droplets were a bit larger (practices a few times from various distances to get the pattern I wanted). Then I sanded it down a bit. Up close, it's not a perfect match to the original grain finish, but from a few feet away, you really can't tell. With my seats in the car, it's also not as visible of a spot as where your speaker holes probably are.

Here's a before & after shot.

Great Job Dan...Now I have another thing to do...
 
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