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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all, I have a 289 C4 GT which I bought before I knew anything about Mustangs (had no idea they had magazines and all that) and now, looking back on it, I jumped the gun and realize that I payed way too much to begin with. The engine was good and so was the Tranny so I got it even though it had no door tag, a lot of chrome missing and with a great deal of rust - which I of course found out about later. I don't even have any history on the car. I've owned it for five years now and have invested a considerable amount of money, practically replacing or rebuilding every major component in it. I still have a ways to go, but I finally took it to a body shop (one that doesn't really specialize on restorations, but since he's a friend is doing it for me) to get some rust and dents taken out and painted. As feared there was some previous , nasty body work done and cancer on the parts where the roof meets the trunk. I was advised to sell it as soon as I had it painted and let someone else deal with it. But I just don't know if I should. Is there any hope for my pony? Can I replace these major body parts with sheet metal? After all, I feel that I've gone through most of the headaches already. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
 

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If it is a true GT and because it's your first Mustang, you could justify the costs and effort. I would say that if the rust is the only problem left and you want to keep the car, learn welding. If the task seems to much, think what the customizers do to the sheet metal. Or you could locate another shell and transfer all the good parts into it.
About the splash of paint and sell advice : a bit dishonest, isn't it.

Door handle first when cornering
 

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It appears that you need more reassurance than advice. First of all, is it a true GT? If it is and you have done a considerable amount of work already, then stick it out. Mustang Monthly has a running restoration on a '66. The project car they feature was in pretty bad shape to begin with, and had some poor body work done to it. The car looks decent now. I think that alot of us have that "I think I paid too much for the car" feeling. Hang in there.
 

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I bought a real basket case Mustang about 12 years ago, although i could see past what it looked like at first, i knew we could rebuild it to it's former glory.I didn't know too much about Mustangs in those day"s, but a 3 year trip away from the car to live in London sure enabled me to read up on them.
the car i bought didn't have one straight panel or the same colour. It was one of 6 Mustang's bought into NewZealand way back in 1989.When my wife and I found out about them ,all of them were sold except for the one we bought. But we got the best one, built on the 28 June 1964, 260v8,c4 auto,8.75--3.00rear,factory kelsey hayes front discs,power steering, and console.

It has taken us in all about 10--12 years of restoring/restomoding to finally get it on the road and after some initial teething problems, I can honestly say,I LUST,OOPS
JUST LOVE DRIVING OUR CAR. So my point is keep up working on your car it is worth the long haul, especially when you get to drive a piece of history that you have restored/rescued from the crusher.Join a club with people that can give good advice and listen and read all you can,
it's really hard to get good advice here, let alone cheap car parts
good luck,
65,289,c4,lemans red
 

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You said your friend's shop specializes in doing newer cars. I'd bet they rely on insurance work almost exclusively. That is where the volume and $$$ are in body work. My point is that your friend may not be the best person to consult in this case.

I think you should get a second opinion. You live in the Bay Area, right? We have a number of members in your neighborhood who could probably suggest a couple of body shops that do older cars on a regular basis. Find at least 2 of them and have them evaluate the car. Be honest with them about your intentions. That is, tell them you are trying to determine if the car is worth restoring - that will help them to understand that this is not a 'money is no object' exercise.

Armed with the information they provide you, the gang here at VMF can help you decide.

Glenn Morgan: 66 GT V-Burgundy Fastback 351w+toploader+9 in. TracLoc. Started out as a rusted-out Chicago-area crusher. After sacrificing a solid 66 coupe for its sheetmetal sub-assemblies, I have one solid (and expensive) work in progress!
 

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Let's face it, to most people, especially those in the auto related industry, they see these Mustangs as old cars. To us, they represent a feeling we get when we see them, drive them, work on them, etc...
Even though these cars can prove to be a good investment, (ask some one who bought a Boss 429 30 years ago and still owns it), but the reason we own have these cars it cause we love 'em.

If you feel an attachment to this car and get a thrill from making it like new (or better), then keep it. If you wish you had never bought the car, sell it, cut your losses. Mustanging costs money, but it ain't about money.

By the way, is a "A" code or a "K" code?

1966 GT Convertible (see it at:http://www.geocities.com/tbeamguard/66GT.html)
1969 Sportsroof (which is For Sale, by the way)
2000 Explorer XLT (daily driver)
2002 Explorer XLT (wife's)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
You're right about the splash of paint, it would be dishonest. I'm considering getting another shell but I wanted to thank you all for the advice and most of all support.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
yes, maybe I'm looking for assurance but the advice to have a couple of "restoring" shops look at it, and the magazine lead was good. As far as the car being a true GT I mostly found clues ( gas cap, , Gt trumpets, GT badging holes on the fenders and fog light holes in the front) since I don't have the door tag to confirm it, but it is an A code Pony.
 
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If you go through the trouble of replacing the metal, why not keep it? Or else replace the metal and sell it for a fair price. To paint it without repairing known damage, and then sell it (assumingly) without telling the new owner of the known problems is fraudulent, and quite unethical besides.

Visit my repair page for Repair info, with pictures! http://home.dencity.com/mustangcub
 

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I don't want to disappoint you but factory disc brakes were not available on the Mustang until the fall of 64. Since you have an early car the disc brakes were added later. They are still very good to have though.

Paul
1965 Mustang 2+2
1989 Mustang GT Convertible
MCA #27261
MCA certified judge for 65's and late models
 
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