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I initially was going with keeping the tunnel and replacing just the floor pans. On the new pan I have, The seat belt mounting hole is about 5” to the rear of the original location. In it’s not even close. Needless to say, I’m not using it and, depending on how bad the pass side is, will be going with the full floor pan.
 

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Been there, done that! Replace the whole floor! I think it was less work in the long run. If your tranny tunnel was wrinkled, it would be a easy decision for me. When you done, it just looks so much nicer than a bunch of patches. I too had the separate floor pieces, but after doing some research and looking at other cars done with one piece, I sold the floor pieces and never looked back.See my sig pic
Ed
 

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Been there, done that! Replace the whole floor! I think it was less work in the long run. If your tranny tunnel was wrinkled, it would be a easy decision for me. When you done, it just looks so much nicer than a bunch of patches. I too had the separate floor pieces, but after doing some research and looking at other cars done with one piece, I sold the floor pieces and never looked back.See my sig pic
Ed
It depends on how much time you spend on patches. Mine looks like a one-piece pan(or close enough that a casual examination would be hard pressed to tell) but its a quilt of patches, I just spent a lot of time grinding, blending, and on bodywork. The grafted-in S197 tunnel stands out the most.

That being said, if I were to do it again, I would certainly use a one-piece pan.
 

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It depends on how much time you spend on patches. Mine looks like a one-piece pan(or close enough that a casual examination would be hard pressed to tell) but its a quilt of patches, I just spent a lot of time grinding, blending, and on bodywork. The grafted-in S197 tunnel stands out the most.

That being said, if I were to do it again, I would certainly use a one-piece pan.
This has me wondering... for those who patch their floors, are most people overlapping the joints (between new and original metal) or are you butt-welding the patch in and grinding the welds down? Looking through old posts, I figured I'll overlap when I get to that stage but is that not "how most people do it?"
 

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This has me wondering... for those who patch their floors, are most people overlapping the joints (between new and original metal) or are you butt-welding the patch in and grinding the welds down? Looking through old posts, I figured I'll overlap when I get to that stage but is that not "how most people do it?"
Couldn't say how most people do it...I butt welded mine and ground the welds down. More work but looks a lot cleaner....I will qualify that with the fact that you get best results this way when you can get at the bottom of the car on a rotisserie or some type of tilting device. I went through probably 2 dozen flap wheels during the restoration portion.
 
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Patch work is exactly what it says it is, “patch work”. To make it look right it will take a lot, a whole lot of time and effort welding and grinding on both sides of the patches.
Go for the “full monte” you will be much happier with the results.
 

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It depends on how much time you spend on patches. Mine looks like a one-piece pan(or close enough that a casual examination would be hard pressed to tell) but its a quilt of patches, I just spent a lot of time grinding, blending, and on bodywork. The grafted-in S197 tunnel stands out the most.

That being said, if I were to do it again, I would certainly use a one-piece pan.
This has me wondering... for those who patch their floors, are most people overlapping the joints (between new and original metal) or are you butt-welding the patch in and grinding the welds down? Looking through old posts, I figured I'll overlap when I get to that stage but is that not "how most people do it?"
[/QUOT
Patch work is exactly what it says it is, “patch work”. To make it look right it will take a lot, a whole lot of time and effort welding and grinding on both sides of the patches.
Go for the “full monte” you will be much happier with the results.
Not really, if your a good welder and know how to butt weld and take your time, it can go very well. Here are my floor pans, not perfect but very tolerable in a race car

PXL_20210206_195259592.jpg
 

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I think in the OPs case it really depends on the condition of the rear frame rails. If just the ends need replacing I would do the floor pan. On the other hand if the majority of the rails are bad (or the torque boxes) then he is going to have to cut up the transition pan, rear rails, etc, and at that point he will be better off with the whole complete floor assembly.
 

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Discussion Starter #31
This has me wondering... for those who patch their floors, are most people overlapping the joints (between new and original metal) or are you butt-welding the patch in and grinding the welds down? Looking through old posts, I figured I'll overlap when I get to that stage but is that not "how most people do it?"
I am by no means an expert, but overlapping will just give an additional area for moisture to accumulate and lead to problems down the road. I planned on butt welding mine, but I’d probably be long gone before it would become an issue for some future owner. I’m pretty much set on the one piece pan over the full assembly at this point.


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I am by no means an expert, but overlapping will just give an additional area for moisture to accumulate and lead to problems down the road. I planned on butt welding mine, but I’d probably be long gone before it would become an issue for some future owner. I’m pretty much set on the one piece pan over the full assembly at this point.


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Ford Originally overlapped most joints. If done rig and properly sealed it’s fine. It’s also much easier than but welding. If you are a good welder and care about looking original, then butt welding is great. I have done some of both on my car. Just depends on the location.
 
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Discussion Starter #33
Ford Originally overlapped most joints. If done rig and properly sealed it’s fine. It’s also much easier than but welding. If you are a good welder and care about looking original, then butt welding is great. I have done some of both on y car. Just depends on the location.
I am not a good welder (20+ years since a single class at JuCo), but I’m determined. Solid, just not pretty... yet.


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I am not a good welder (20+ years since a single class at JuCo), but I’m determined. Solid, just not pretty... yet.


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"A grinder and some paint makes a welder what he aint" You don't have to be an expert welder for the final product to come out good, all you need is the time to grind and do the bodywork needed before painting. For me, I wasn't afraid to go back and re-do things that didn't look acceptable the first time around...but it is critical to be able to get at both sides of the weld...at least if you are like me and work under the car often....you are after all the one who has to look at it.
 

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Ford Originally overlapped most joints. If done rig and properly sealed it’s fine. It’s also much easier than but welding. If you are a good welder and care about looking original, then butt welding is great. I have done some of both on my car. Just depends on the location.
Ford overlap mostly because they use spot welding most everything
 
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