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1967 Mustang Convertible - 200 Six - 3 Speed Manual Transmission
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Discussion Starter #1
This is on my 1967 Mustang. It has the 200 six with an original 3 speed stick shift transmission. It is also pretty noisy while driving in gear. Enough to be annoying. Shifts and drives great. Would it be a throwout bearing? Pilot bearing? How do I go about figuring out what it is so I can fix it? Thanks!
 

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Seems like pulling the transmission is the only way to fix either of those issues. Also best way to diagnose the problem as well. My bet based on what you are describing is a typical symptom of a throw out bearing going out.
 

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Check where the rod touches the fork for adjustment, get a new $8 spring for it before you trouble with taking anything apart.
 

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This is on my 1967 Mustang. It has the 200 six with an original 3 speed stick shift transmission. It is also pretty noisy while driving in gear. Enough to be annoying. Shifts and drives great. Would it be a throwout bearing? Pilot bearing? How do I go about figuring out what it is so I can fix it? Thanks!
Pilot bearing/bushing is rotating when the engine is running, clutch pedal is down (disengaged) and transmission is in or out gear. Clutch release bearing would also be turning.
When the clutch pedal is up (engaged), neither the pilot nor the clutch release should be spinning. Any bearing noise you hear would be inside the trans, probably bearing at the input shaft.
 

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1967 Mustang Convertible - 200 Six - 3 Speed Manual Transmission
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Discussion Starter #5
1ofAMillion+ "Check where the rod touches the fork for adjustment, get a new $8 spring for it before you trouble with taking anything apart." I sure would prefer it was something adjustable like that. Not sure what I'm looking for under there? What would be causing the noise? Thanks all of the replies!
 

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1967 Mustang Convertible - 200 Six - 3 Speed Manual Transmission
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Discussion Starter #6
Pilot bearing/bushing is rotating when the engine is running, clutch pedal is down (disengaged) and transmission is in or out gear. Clutch release bearing would also be turning.
When the clutch pedal is up (engaged), neither the pilot nor the clutch release should be spinning. Any bearing noise you hear would be inside the trans, probably bearing at the input shaft.
When clutch pedal is down to the floor I do not hear any noise (while car is idling and out of gear) when I release the clutch pedal I hear noise. It is not going to be either throwout bearing or pilot bearing? Please confirm I am understanding this correctly. Thanks
 

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Your understanding is correct. Noise is most likely the input shaft bearing inside the trans.
Any way you look at it, the trans is coming out. Or turn up the stereo.
 

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At idle: quiet when pedal is pressed to floor, noisy when released
You transmission is either low on fluid or the bearings are pitted or damaged, which causes the noise you are hearing.
 

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Once you have released the clutch the throw-out bearing and pilot bearing on no longer spinning so they cannot be the source of your noise. That's if you have you have some pedal free play so the throw-out bearing is not touching the pressure plate fingers.

If its a bizarre squealing type of noise that only lasts a second "while" you are only releasing the clutch pedal but stops as the clutch clamps down its probably a dry pilot bearing spinning on the input shaft. Once the clutch is released the input shaft is locked to the flywheel and they spin together. This type of noise is almost always worn and dry pilot bearing. It would not make any noise once you were in gear and driving

A throw-out bearing would make noise with the pedal depressed, Also, if you just rested your foot on the pedal,enough to eliminate the free play you will feel the rough spinning throw out bearing, Once the pedal is released the throw-out bearing is not spinning and the noise stops (if you have free play) It will not make any noise while driving unless your shifting.


That leaves the input and output shaft bearings, the cluster gear's shaft and bearings or you have a chipped or worn gear. If its a bad trans bearing or chipped gear tooth they make two different noises.

To narrow down the source of the noise first you need to understand what direction the power goes through the transmission, what are the different parts in the trans that are turning when its in neutral, or first gear, or second gear and straight through third gear. T.

In neutral the input shaft is spinning and the cluster gear. The mainshaft is not turning so if the noise is still there in neutral it cannot be the output shaft bearing that is not spinning

In 1st and 2nd the input shaft bearing, bearings between the input and output shaft and the cluster gear needle bearings are spinning and the output shaft bearing. Any of those bearings could be bad and cause noise

In 3rd gear the input shaft is locked to the main shaft so the power goes straight through. No power is being applied to the cluster gear. So If its not as noisy in 3rd it could be a pitted cluster gear shaft.

If its only noisy in first or second are noisy it could have a worn or chipped gear.

I worked at the phone company as a mechanic for 30-years. When I first got into the fleet garage in the early 1980s they still had a lot 1970s Ford Vans with 3 speed manual transmission. Close to 400 vehicles and all of them were manual transmission except for the supervisors cars. I got a lot of trans rebuilding experience. The phone company was so cheap they would not buy the proper bearing and seal drivers. We had a press to remove the front and rear bearings. The rest of the work was done with hammers and punches. That worked just fine. Too show you haw tight they were with money the Ford vans manual 3-speed transmission would get noisy. The problem was almost always the cluster gear haft would be pitted bad. Only the top of the shaft gets pitted because the force from the cluster gear is pushpin down on the shaft. That is not force on the bottom of the shaft. Instead of letting us run down to the Ford Dealer and buy a new shaft for $20.00. They had us rotate the shaft 180 degrees and stick the roll pin back in. As Mickey Mouse as this sounds. The trans was quiet and ran for another ten-year's that way.

These are the simplest transmission to rebuild. A great trans to learn on. You can disassemble it yourself and have the auto parts store press off and on your input and output bearings. Try to use Timken bearngs.


All of the above problems require disassembling the trans. While your in there your going definitely replace the input and output bearings, front and rear seals and probably a tailshaft bushing if your driveshaft yoke has any play. Check the play between the bushing and yoke before you remove the driveshaft. Also check the u-joints for any play.
While your in there. Have the flywheel surfaced, New clutch, pilot bearing and throw-out bearing. Check the clutch fork for wear and cracks. Check the forks pivot that is riveted to the housing. Trust me, they break. Ford carried replacements that bolted back in. I had a '65 mustang with a Factory Boss 302 clutch. A little stiffer then a stock clutch. One day I pulled up to a stop sign, pushed in the pedal and that pivot snapped and the car lurches forward. I was able to get the trans into neutral but I had no clutch. I had a factory GT-40 Lemans cam in the car, gear drive all that great stuff. The only thing I ground do was shut it off. Put in gear and then start the car while in gear. It bucked and jumped trying get the car moving with that big cam. Then the rest of the way I could shift without the clutch and I managed to get the car home. I've looked closely at every fork and pivot ever since

On the trans inspect the input bearing retainer for wear from the throw-out bearing sliding back and forth. Replace the brass blocking rings, both bearings and seals and possibly the cluster gear needle bearings and shaft, along with the tailshaft bushing. That bushing requires special tools to replace. Inspect the bearings between the input and out put shafts. Make sure you do not have a lot slop between those two shafts or it will want to pop out of second or third gear.

Look at the rubber trans mount and make sure it is not broke, the rubber is not spongy from oil contaminant or the rubber has petrified. You might as well stick a new trans mount in there. My thing is i only want to do the job once so if there any doubt I replace it.

Make sure your whining noise is not in the rearend. My sister has an oriignal paint 64 1/2 convertible with a 170 ci engine and a 3-speed without a synchronized first gear. She has owned it since 1980. On a steep hill there is not enough power to climb it in second gear with that 170 and you cannot downshift into first without a synchro. So you have to come to a complete stop on the steep hill. Put it back first gear and try not to fry the clutch to get it moving again. It has to be the worst engine and trans combo to ever come in a Mustang. The reason I brought this car up is it has a whine in the rearend that is not bad enough to fix but it bugs me at freeway speeds. My guess is its a pinion bearing. She doesn't drive it so I'm not going fix it. My dad bought a '65, 6-cyl Mustang new. Its rearend whined a little bit. As a little kid I 'd sleep in the back seat with my head against the bottom seat cushion and listen to the whine of the rearend until I fell asleep. It wasn't very loud but it was noticeable.






If thoise happend with you foo
 
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