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1966 Mustang GT 4sp Nightmist Blue
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Discussion Starter #1
Good Evening Everyone!

Hope everyone is safe and getting things accomplished on lock down

I have been beating up these guys @Nailbender @Mac-427 @Daniel Hartigan a lot lately and they have been patient and a blessing(thanks again)!! So I figured I would ask the rest of the board your thoughts as well.

I was getting ready to order my tank, regulator and fuel filter from Aeromotive and the sales person/tech asked how I was going to run the lines(Im installing a Pro Flo 4). I told him I was going to use the factory line as a return and order a new 3/8ths line from NPD and modify that to use as my supply line.

He suggested running PTFE braided line front to back for both supply and return. He stated its safe, will have less joints for potential leaks and overall be the same $ and be lot faster to get up and running. Since I need a 37 degree flare kit, the new line plus all the adapters, it kinda made sense.

I am looking for pros/cons to this construct.

Thank you for reading and replying in advance. :)

Chris
 

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Somebody not too long ago had that sag in get caught in their driveshaft if I recall.
 

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My builder also said that’s the way to go. Said he’s been installing Snipers for years and has never had an issue when they’re run correctly.
 

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I used 5/16 for my return and 3/8 for my supply using 90% of the stock routing since I added a filter. I also used less than 1 ft of fuel injection line with crimped hose clamps for my Fitech install with in tank fuel pump. No issues so far
AAB9A1E6-0F49-43C2-ADBD-2E199C20B5DC.jpeg
 

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Ptfe is what all the modern car guys use. It doesn't allow gas smell in your garage either
 

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1966 Mustang GT 4sp Nightmist Blue
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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks everyone!! Im still undecided so...... @Nailbender I have a few more questions Ill take off line lol

Chris
 

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My plan for my pf4 is to use my brand new, still in the box, 3/8" stainless fuel line from Classic Tube for the supply line from the tank to engine. I'll then modify it at the engine to connect to the fuel rail with an AN fuel hose off some sort, PTFE lined. I'm running the Holley in tank pump kit that is returnless, i.e. it returns in the tank. Easy and straight forward. Edelbrock confirmed with me that it is okay to not use a return line in my setup. It's not ideal though because their tunes were done with manifold referenced regulators. The gentleman I spoke to said the self learning system should be able to adjust in my case enough percentage. I'm going to see how that works before I plumb in a return line.

As for PTFE line, I recently used the plastic line, not braided, to install my new fuel injection tank in my 68 C10. I ran it only inside the frame rails and then used expensive line with AN fittings at both ends to run to the tank and the engine. I was happy with that but the C10 has a frame rails that protects the plastic line. The plastic line avoided me having to custom been stainless line to go the distance. On a unibody car, I like my plan I laid it above best.

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Good Evening Everyone!

Hope everyone is safe and getting things accomplished on lock down

I have been beating up these guys @Nailbender @Mac-427 @Daniel Hartigan a lot lately and they have been patient and a blessing(thanks again)!! So I figured I would ask the rest of the board your thoughts as well.

I was getting ready to order my tank, regulator and fuel filter from Aeromotive and the sales person/tech asked how I was going to run the lines(Im installing a Pro Flo 4). I told him I was going to use the factory line as a return and order a new 3/8ths line from NPD and modify that to use as my supply line.

He suggested running PTFE braided line front to back for both supply and return. He stated its safe, will have less joints for potential leaks and overall be the same $ and be lot faster to get up and running. Since I need a 37 degree flare kit, the new line plus all the adapters, it kinda made sense.

I am looking for pros/cons to this construct.

Thank you for reading and replying in advance. :)

Chris
It's fuel. There's just no way I'd run anything but mild steel. I have the original fuel line on our '68 for the return and going down the passenger side I
have the 3/8" steel line. It's an Edelbrock ProFlo 1.

We had a weld/fab guy get too close with a MIG while doing subframes on a 1993 Camaro. If a fire bottle hadn't been within 10 feet, he probably
would have burned the shop down. We had to VIP order the plastic fuel lines since the car was one of the first off the line and SPO didn't have
fuel lines at the parts counter level yet.

I learned not to take chances with fuel lines a long time ago.

ex-Global West GM
1991-1995
 

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1966 Mustang GT 4sp Nightmist Blue
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Discussion Starter #9
It's fuel. There's just no way I'd run anything but mild steel. I have the original fuel line on our '68 for the return and going down the passenger side I
have the 3/8" steel line. It's an Edelbrock ProFlo 1.

We had a weld/fab guy get too close with a MIG while doing subframes on a 1993 Camaro. If a fire bottle hadn't been within 10 feet, he probably
would have burned the shop down. We had to VIP order the plastic fuel lines since the car was one of the first off the line and SPO didn't have
fuel lines at the parts counter level yet.

I learned not to take chances with fuel lines a long time ago.

ex-Global West GM
1991-1995
Thank you!
 

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Good Evening Everyone!

Hope everyone is safe and getting things accomplished on lock down

I have been beating up these guys @Nailbender @Mac-427 @Daniel Hartigan a lot lately and they have been patient and a blessing(thanks again)!! So I figured I would ask the rest of the board your thoughts as well.

I was getting ready to order my tank, regulator and fuel filter from Aeromotive and the sales person/tech asked how I was going to run the lines(Im installing a Pro Flo 4). I told him I was going to use the factory line as a return and order a new 3/8ths line from NPD and modify that to use as my supply line.

He suggested running PTFE braided line front to back for both supply and return. He stated its safe, will have less joints for potential leaks and overall be the same $ and be lot faster to get up and running. Since I need a 37 degree flare kit, the new line plus all the adapters, it kinda made sense.

I am looking for pros/cons to this construct.

Thank you for reading and replying in advance. :)

Chris
I thought I would mention that the Holley retrofit EFI pump uses the stock tank and installs from underneath the car, simplifying many things, including plumbing and even just keeping the stock tank. It uses a special mat spread out on the bottom of the tank eliminating the need for internal tank baffles. I like easy.

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1966 Mustang GT 4sp Nightmist Blue
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Discussion Starter #11
I thought I would mention that the Holley retrofit EFI pump uses the stock tank and installs from underneath the car, simplifying many things, including plumbing and even just keeping the stock tank. It uses a special mat spread out on the bottom of the tank eliminating the need for internal tank baffles. I like easy.

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I like simple and thought long about doing the same thing but then bit the bullet . I made the determination that I wanted to increase from 16 gallons to 20 so I went ahead and purchased an Aeromotive Stealth 2 tank for a 1969 Mustang and it too uses the stock outlet area.

Im thinking I will just remove my lines, make the adjustments and then reinstall. Its just a little more difficult with the engine and everything still in place working in a one car garage but not impossible!! LOL

Chris
 

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I thought I would mention that the Holley retrofit EFI pump uses the stock tank and installs from underneath the car, simplifying many things, including plumbing and even just keeping the stock tank. It uses a special mat spread out on the bottom of the tank eliminating the need for internal tank baffles. I like easy.

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What do you mean, "mat spreads out on the bottom of the tank"?
 

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What do you mean, "mat spreads out on the bottom of the tank"?
Looks like they call it a Hydromat Filter. It has a membrane that allows liquid to flow through it but the moment any part the mat is exposed to air, that section seals up so that fuel is sucked in from the parts of the mat that are still submerged in fuel. Cool stuff.


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I like simple and thought long about doing the same thing but then bit the bullet . I made the determination that I wanted to increase from 16 gallons to 20 so I went ahead and purchased an Aeromotive Stealth 2 tank for a 1969 Mustang and it too uses the stock outlet area.

Im thinking I will just remove my lines, make the adjustments and then reinstall. Its just a little more difficult with the engine and everything still in place working in a one car garage but not impossible!! LOL

Chris
I did sort of the same thing but different. Back when I thought I would stay with a carburetor, I bought a brand new 20 gallon tank. Later, I decided to go EFI and looked for pump options that would work with that tank. That's when I settled on the Holley retrofit pump kit.

I'm sure your path will work great too!

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Looks like they call it a Hydromat Filter. It has a membrane that allows liquid to flow through it but the moment any part the mat is exposed to air, that section seals up so that fuel is sucked in from the parts of the mat that are still submerged in fuel. Cool stuff.


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Incredible!!!
Wow.
I guess, theoretically, it could get clogged with rust/junk in the tank, BUT, it prob can be pulled out, thus taking all the junk out, right?
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Thank you everyone!

Case closed. :) Im going to run as much hard line as I can. I needed to hear from my fellow enthusiasts and not be swayed by something just because its easy.

Chris
 
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First off, you are wasting money with the Aeromotive tank:


You can get this from Rock Auto....its better than the Aeromotive tank to start with because it does not run lines in the trunk...it runs lines the exact same way the factory did....it also comes with a pump for a combined price that i hard to beat.

That being said, NEVER run braided stainless lines except as the shortest flex section of hose as possible. Braided stainless is pretty yes...but its also heavy and acts like a hacksaw on unprotected surfaces. I always just take good old steel brake line, a tubing bender, and tube nuts and bend my own fuel line...works great..can pick up a roll of 3/8" line down at your local auto parts store for a little over $1/foot. The advantage to bending your own line is you can route it better than the factory did....along the top of the trans tunnel is my preference(you can do a new brake line at the same time) then just use a flaring tool after slipping on a tube nut and you can connect your new hard line to a fuel distribution block or directly to a RUBBER fuel injection hose you use for your flex section(you don't even need tube nuts, doubling up fuel injection hose clamps directly onto the tubing will hold up to at least 75psi....double flaring it will add some peace of mind though.
 

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First off, you are wasting money with the Aeromotive tank:


You can get this from Rock Auto....its better than the Aeromotive tank to start with because it does not run lines in the trunk...it runs lines the exact same way the factory did....it also comes with a pump for a combined price that i hard to beat.

That being said, NEVER run braided stainless lines except as the shortest flex section of hose as possible. Braided stainless is pretty yes...but its also heavy and acts like a hacksaw on unprotected surfaces. I always just take good old steel brake line, a tubing bender, and tube nuts and bend my own fuel line...works great..can pick up a roll of 3/8" line down at your local auto parts store for a little over $1/foot. The advantage to bending your own line is you can route it better than the factory did....along the top of the trans tunnel is my preference(you can do a new brake line at the same time) then just use a flaring tool after slipping on a tube nut and you can connect your new hard line to a fuel distribution block or directly to a RUBBER fuel injection hose you use for your flex section(you don't even need tube nuts, doubling up fuel injection hose clamps directly onto the tubing will hold up to at least 75psi....double flaring it will add some peace of mind though.
I run the Spectra tank and like many others the black gunk that they left in the early tanks killed the original fuel pump instantly. I have never had a company NOT admit to what was a common problem and offer no help or compensation. And I hate having simple barbed fittings coming out of the tank handling 58 psi.
 

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And I hate having simple barbed fittings coming out of the tank handling 58 psi.
I hear you but some quick math of a 3/8" tube shows that the area is .29 square inches and when subjected to 58 pounds per square inch it only has to hold 17.1 pounds of axial force. As long as the clamp used holds that much force pulling on the hose, it won't pop off. Then all the barb and clamp have to do is keep the thing from leaking.

The barb fitting is all my Holley Retrofit fuel pump has for connection for 58 psi. I wouldn't use a worm drive hose clamp and normal rubber hose by any means but I'll use high quality fuel injection hose with a proper pinch clamp meant for the application. I have no doubt that will work just fine. I'll probably use two just because though. In fact, Holley's entire vapor lock EFI AN hose lineup uses barbed fittings on the AN hose ends.

Earls 750011ERL Earl's Vapor Guard™ Hose Clamp
 

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Discussion Starter #20
First off, you are wasting money with the Aeromotive tank:


You can get this from Rock Auto....its better than the Aeromotive tank to start with because it does not run lines in the trunk...it runs lines the exact same way the factory did....it also comes with a pump for a combined price that i hard to beat.

That being said, NEVER run braided stainless lines except as the shortest flex section of hose as possible. Braided stainless is pretty yes...but its also heavy and acts like a hacksaw on unprotected surfaces. I always just take good old steel brake line, a tubing bender, and tube nuts and bend my own fuel line...works great..can pick up a roll of 3/8" line down at your local auto parts store for a little over $1/foot. The advantage to bending your own line is you can route it better than the factory did....along the top of the trans tunnel is my preference(you can do a new brake line at the same time) then just use a flaring tool after slipping on a tube nut and you can connect your new hard line to a fuel distribution block or directly to a RUBBER fuel injection hose you use for your flex section(you don't even need tube nuts, doubling up fuel injection hose clamps directly onto the tubing will hold up to at least 75psi....double flaring it will add some peace of mind though.
Thank you I appreciate your feedback.

I did not go with the tank you mention because of the litany of problems associated with it and Aeromotive stands behind their products 100%. Pay a little more now or a lot later. The stealth tank runs the lines out of the bottom of the tank just like the tank you mentioned above. Gen II Stealth Tank, ’69-’70 Mustang – Aeromotive, Inc

Too we are speaking of two different types of fuel lines. I am speaking of braided PTFE line which is impervious to any fuel. Look it up, its great stuff.

I prefer the method of using an AN fitting or something similar. Its peace of mind. For a couple hundred dollars, that is money well spent IMO.

Chris
 
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