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After doing some research (vmf searching), I decided this along with some bilstein shocks should cure my bump steer problems.

My 67 mustang has a 1" shelby drop with a TCP Manual R&P

I have all shims installed

Does this look correct?
Any cool tools for setting toe?
Did you apply loctite on the jam nuts?

I will have to set toe as close as I can so I can drive 60 miles to the nearest alignment shop.
 

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I will have to set toe as close as I can so I can drive 60 miles to the nearest alignment shop.
With the steering wheel turned straight forward, use something long and straight as a line from the rear wheels to the front wheels. Preferable at center hight of the wheels. It can get you fairly close.
 

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If you want to eliminate or reduce bump steer, you will first have to measure it. Longacre Racing makes one of the best known gauges, SorT and Summit sell them. In order to measure your bump steer, you will need to get the front end on jack stands, remove the wheels, springs and shocks. Reinstall the wheel and set up the bump steer fixture. Then it's just a bunch of trial and error getting out as much as you can for the full movement of the suspension.

Here is a link to the Longacre gauge. They may also have a tutorial on how it's done on their website somewhere.
Longacre Bump Steer Gauge 79005
 
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I made a bump steer gauge out of a piece of 2" angle with a straight line laser level attached to it. I bungeed it to the tire. You could see the laser line toe in or out through the motion of the tire up and down. It worked great with the Baer kit.
 
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