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How do I get the spindle off of the upper ball joint? I have tried penetrating oil, heat and a BFH. Other than this problem, the suspension rebuild is going great on my 68 6cy-conversion car. I do not want to have to remove the spinle from the rest of the suspension but I will if I have to.

John L. Anschutz
Allen, TX
68 Diamond Blue Coupe - 302
68 Acapulco Blue Coupe - I6 - 200
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I use two BFH's (hammers). I hold one against the spindle next to the ball joint stud. Then I smack the opposite side of the spindle with the second hammer. The resulting impact usually loosens the tapered stud enough to remove it.

Jack Collins
1966 Mustang Coupe
250 Aussie Crossflow / T-5

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Did you try using a pickle fork which is the proper tool for removing balljoints/tierods? It spreads the load across both surfaces and literally pops one loose from the other...

randy

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I use a tool I made that literally attempts to spread the spindle yoke apart at the ball joint locations...it goes between the upper and lower joints and has a nut in the middle to spread the tool and stress the joints and spindle...

Then, a good smack on the spindle in the ball joint taper area 9 times out of 10 pops the taper right out....I've even been able to on occasion use two hammers and do both tapers at the same time...

I believe these tools are also sold....

A press or pickle fork also can stress the taper in the same manner....depends on what you have...

Pat
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Go to Autozone and borrow their ball joint pickle fork (only don't go to the one near my house 'cause their fork is in my garage *LOL*).

You need the right tool for the right job. The first front end I ever re-built (oh, about 20 years ago) I did without a pickle fork. It took forever to separate the ball joints. Last weekend, working on the '65 with a pickle fork, each ball joint took longer to get the cotter pin out than it did to seperate the ball joint. It's the only way to fly when working on front ends!!

If you always do what you've always done,
You'll always get what you've always got

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The proper way to separate the ball joint from the spindle is to use a ball joint separator which you can rent from a tool rentall shop or possibly your local auto supply store.

PICKLE FORKS are not the way to go if you want to save the ball joint as it may damage the rubber boot. A proper ball joint separator is a small tool that has two fingers that go between the control arm and the ball joint and a big threaded screw that presses onto the centre of the ball joint stud. By tightening the screw it places pressure on the stud and forces it out of the control arm.



[color:blue]68 GT500[color:blue]
[color:green]68 1/2 CJ Coupe</font color=green>

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Just a waring, I've been told by the garage i deal with that you should never heat front end components. I had the same problem with my upper ball joint a pickle fork and pneumatic fork simply did not work. Took it to the garage where they clamped the spindle and smashed the ball joint out. When in doubt use a bigger hammer. It works
 
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