Vintage Mustang Forums banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,305 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,
I noticed the PO of my new '67 GT added a Flamethrower coil and Pertronix. He also added a ballast resistor I think to work with the tach....I'm wondering if this was needed and maybe it is causing the hesitation under a load about 3K rpms?

The can runs great up til 3K and then starts to break up.

Any thoughts would be great,

Thanks,
Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,200 Posts
Depends where the feed wire for coil is coming from. If it is using the original wiring there is already a resistor wire in the circuit and the ballast will really cut down voltage to coil. If the feed wire is direct 12 volts you probably neeed the ballast resistor check the feed wire to coil with the key on and it should be less than 12 volts. 8-9 gary
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,305 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Hey Gary,

I'll have to check on that.
I did notice if I took the ballast wire off the coil the car didn't get any spark...I put it back on and it fired right up. I also think the wire/boot was not on well and now the breaking up seems to be gone /forums/images/icons/smile.gif

Mike
 

·
Gone but never forgetten
Joined
·
25,239 Posts
Nieither the Flame Thrower Coil, nor the Pertronix Ignitor need the reduced voltage of a resistor wire, or after market ballist resistor. In fact, both PREFER a full 12v. I'd remove the ballist resistor. It simply can't help anything with your setup, and people think a MOPAR guy worked on it when they see a ballist resistor /forums/images/icons/wink.gif.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,305 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the info...however, when I disconnect the ballast resistor, the car won't start, no spark. Any idea how I need to wire it up when I remove the ballast? Just run the wires that go to the ballast right to the coil?

Thanks,
Mike
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
19,203 Posts
If the car starts with a ballast resistor, it should start bypassing it. Yes, put the wire that goes to the ballast from the ignition switch directly to the wire side of the coil that the ballast is hooked up to. This assumes that the ballast resister is between the ignition switch and the coil.

The worst that can happen is that you'll burn up the points a bit quicker, and, if the coil is not rated for full 12V, you'll burn that up within a month or so.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,305 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thanks guys, I'm gonna do some tinkering tomorrow after work and see what happenes.

Man is it fun playing with a classic again /forums/images/icons/smile.gif I love it.

Mike
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top