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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My new project has some bare sheet metal exposed to the elements. The surface rust was minimal until I purchased it and exposed it to the elements for the last few weeks. I'm setting aside some time next weekend to clean up the exposed areas and protect them properly. The car will eventually be stripped to bare metal then sprayed with epoxy primer, but I want to clean up the rusted spots and protect them for now. I'm looking at Eastwood's Rust encapsulator, would this or POR-15 cause me problems when the car gets completely stripped in the future? Would this be a good choice for protectiong the parts of the car that I will be grinding and cutting on?

Thanks,
 

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If you're going to sandblast, or otherwise clean the entire car than don't even worry about it. you will waist your time and $$$ on expensive paint that you are just going to sandblast off. if its really bugging you, than you can sand it with some sandpaper to get most of the rust off, and spray it with some cheep hardware store primer to slow its progress. just my $.02 anyways

- Jason
 

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Don't us POR-15, that stuff would be hard to tear off. My experience with Encapsulater has been a crap shoot - some stuff still busted out with rust.

If you plan on keeping it bare for a while, I think a layer of cheap paint would be better than porus primer or the anti-rust paint.

If you plan to get to it within a couple months, I'd let it rust - unless you live near the ocean, then use a cheap top coat.

My humble obs,

Dean T
 

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Don't us POR-15, that stuff would be hard to tear off. My experience with Encapsulater has been a crap shoot - some stuff still busted out with rust.

If you plan on keeping it bare for a while, I think a layer of cheap paint would be better than porus primer or the anti-rust paint.

If you plan to get to it within a couple months, I'd let it rust - unless you live near the ocean, then use a cheap top coat.

My humble obs,

Dean T
 

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I recall a prior post that suggested using Metal Prep or some other phosphate type treatment to keep flash rust from reappearing after it has been removed from bare metal. It was a wipe on and wipe off type of treatment IIRC. Anyone else remember that?
 

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I had the same problem with the new floor pans and quarters doing the same thing. I used 220 on a random sander and then put a thin film of machine oil on exposed metal. So far 3 month's....no rust.
Mike.
 

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I had the same problem with the new floor pans and quarters doing the same thing. I used 220 on a random sander and then put a thin film of machine oil on exposed metal. So far 3 month's....no rust.
Mike.
yeah... whatever you do, do NOT do that. putting any sort of oil on body panels is just about the biggest no-no in car building there is. its almost impossible to get it all out of the bare metal, and you'll have problems getting the paint to stick. your just asking for loads of trouble. plus, rust will eventully get through a lightly oiled surface ime. especially one that has been touched by human hands.

- Jason
 

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Just go to Ace hardware and buy some Ospho, which is a phosphate application which disolves surface rust and turns the heavy rust into an inert metal. It also keeps flash rust from happening. Just don't touch the metal after you apply the ospho because if you do you will find rust spots where you touched it later on.
 

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I would not use a por-15 product. That's more for hidden areas that you do not want to strip off the rust. I would use a DA with 80 grit to get most of the rust off then use and acid wash to remove the rest. Then seal it off with a cheap enamel until you get ready to start fresh. Until you lay down an epoxy primer, theres no guaranty you wont be doing it over if you leave it outside. In other words the surface rust may just come back anyway until it's sealed properly.


Since you live down the road from me why don't you just strip the panels and I will lay down some epoxy for you. That way when you get ready to work on it, you can just continue on top.

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks Larry, I don't have much in the way of funds until I sell the burgundy vert, but I think I'll get as much rust off as I can and cover it up. Who makes the acid wash? Is it anthing like the stuff I saw on Eastwood's site, or is it different?
 

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That's the stuff. You can find it in many different brands, but it's just Phosphoric acid watered down. Eastwood is a little overpriced IMHO. I purchased some in concentrate recently and they only had it in the gallon. It's enough to make eight gallons mixed. More than I will ever use. You are welcome to some if you would like.

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Yeah, Eastwood is proud of their stuff, but it's a good place to window shop.

Thanks for the offer, I'd like to come by and see your shop some time. I'll PM you and try to set up a time in the next week or so.

Thanks again.
 

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Have been having bare metal probs, owing to SE. Fl. rainy season and outrageeous humidity. Ospho is a good way to go. It has an 8 hour cure and when dry leaves a coating. Have been using this, next day, a light scuff and a p*** coat of Sems brand self etch primer. Seems to be working. Not talking about large areas, just anywhere there is a patch of bare metal. Keeping car covered and waiting for break in weather before applying DPL50LF gray epoxy primer. A word about Ospho. Ospho and bondo, Ospho and epoxy, are not good friends. In fact, Ospho does not cure well over a painted surface. It stays sticky. A wipe with Iso alcohol on a paper towel will pick up the Ospho that is on the paint. If the bare metal that is being protected with Ospho, needs any filler later, get if off. A wipe with baking soda/water will neutralize the metal. It also removes protection so get your filler on fast.(at this point, hit the soon to be applied area with a 40 grit scuff) I use a hair dryer for this purpose. A typical "defensive" day's activity in metal preparation in S. Fl. :: Learned the hard way about bondo and Ospho, applying mud on a good sized area, only to razor blade the un-cured mess off ::

Because of the weather, bad timing, am doing the prep in sections, back end, door and fender, etc. Being a cv it is easy to do it this way and it keeps bare metal to a minimum.
 

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When you say "exposed to the elements", do you mean it is outside unprotected and gets rained on? If so, you will need to protect the metal with a primer (after removing the surface rust), or as suggested earlier just let it go until you get it blasted. If it is indoors or not directly exposed to water, quite often treating the surface with Ospho or other similar product will protect the "bare" surface for months. My vert is in my garage and on areas of unprotected bare metal surface rust has formed. Where I have treated with Picklex20, it's clean as a whistle.
 

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I had the same problem with the new floor pans and quarters doing the same thing. I used 220 on a random sander and then put a thin film of machine oil on exposed metal. So far 3 month's....no rust.
Mike.
yeah... whatever you do, do NOT do that. putting any sort of oil on body panels is just about the biggest no-no in car building there is. its almost impossible to get it all out of the bare metal, and you'll have problems getting the paint to stick. your just asking for loads of trouble. plus, rust will eventully get through a lightly oiled surface ime. especially one that has been touched by human hands.

- Jason
Gee, all those new repro body part's I bought, floor pans, quarter panels, 4 inner front aprons that came shipped with an oil coating to protect them from rusting are doomed. Not so.....they must be prepped properly before painting.
Mike.
 
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