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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all,

I bought a new battery in Aug. '08 and had zero issues with it until now. I parked the stang in storage (cold) on or around Dec. 1st 2010. I go to check on the car around late Jan./early Feb. open the door and no lights come on so I figure the battery is dead. Didn't worry about it because it died in storage the year before. The other day I take the battery out to get it charged at Autozone and they tell me that the battery is bad and wont accept a charge!

Not a huge deal since batteries aren't that expensive. My concern is what could cause a battery to go bad in the first place so I don't duplicate this again? Before storing I was adding a amp but I disconnected everything before shuting everything down.

What's the advantage of an extra $100 for the Optima batteries?
 

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I don't use my convertible in the winter, and year-round I keep a Battery Tender on it. It's about 10 years old.

I can't see spending $200+ on a battery, unless it's "concours correct" show battery.

 

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I love optimas but just get a 3-year warrenty battery and keep a tender on it and you will keep it awhile. keep your reciept and they should pro-rate your new battery and save you some cash if it sould go bad after 3 years.
 

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I have a number of cars in the collection along with a MH for racing. It was a crazy expense every year until I hooked up Battery Tenders to all of them. Well worth the money. Many vehicles have low level current draws that will kill a battery over a winter of storage.
+++ Battery Tenders
 

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In my experience if you have even a slight drain the battery will go dead, and if you leave it that way for a month or two- its over. I dunno why chemically it does. Pull the ground cable if you don't want to buy a battery tender. It would still be good to charge it the normal way maybe once during the winter
 

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If your battery is dying in 2 months time sitting, you have an excessive current draw somewhere. My car sits all winter long, I start it every month or so and it fires right up. I have 800+W worth of amps and a modern radio. My battery does not drain or excessively self discharge.

Get an ammeter, hook it up in series with your negative battery cable. Start pulling fuses until the draw goes away. Then start disconnecting loads off that circuit until there is little to no draw with that fuse back in. Should be less than 10mA even with a modern stereo's memory wire.

Alternatively, blow it off, disconnect the battery all winter. A good battery will not self discharge suffiiciently over the course of a few months to prevent a car from starting. When I used to be in the navy, I would do this for my car when I left it in deployed parking form 3-4 months at a time. Always started right up when I got home.

Or buy a battery tender as previously mentioned. I would fix the current draw myself. I had this very problem after I finished my car. Turned out to be an amp that was drawing power all the time even when the car was off. The internal SSR that turned the amp on had failed and was sending power to it, even when there was no signal from the remote wire from the stereo. Replaced amp, no more problems.

Jafo
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the replys. Now that I had some more time to think about it I believe it's the amp's power cable that was hooked up to the solenoid. I thought it was hooked up directly to the battery but I don't remember un-hooking anything extra when I took the battery out. If that's the case then the amp wires were "live" until the battery died. That's a scarry thought.

I have a battery tender but the place I'm storing doesn't have electrical connections. I'll pick up one of the cigarette lighter tenders next time. That should do the trick.

Thanks again.
 

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I bought an Interstate battery (24F equiv) in 2005 and it is still going strong. It's been discharged a number of times, leaving interior lights on for a week or forgetting to turn the headlights off. I don't know about spending $175 for a battery that I still may have to replace after three years.
 

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Thanks for the replys. Now that I had some more time to think about it I believe it's the amp's power cable that was hooked up to the solenoid. I thought it was hooked up directly to the battery but I don't remember un-hooking anything extra when I took the battery out. If that's the case then the amp wires were "live" until the battery died. That's a scarry thought.

I have a battery tender but the place I'm storing doesn't have electrical connections. I'll pick up one of the cigarette lighter tenders next time. That should do the trick.

Thanks again.
An amp that is connected properly and working right should draw 0 power with the hot lead hooked directly to the battery. After all that is the way it is supposed to be wired. The trigger signal from the remote lead is what actually turns on the amp and allows it to start to work.

Just reread, sounds like you actually disconnected the power wire from the amp itself? This is obviously a bad idea as you seem to have realized. Better idea for this would be to remove the inline fuse. If you did not connect one, do so or you are asking for a fire. The amp power wire should have an inline fuse as close to the battery as possible.


Jafo
 
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