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Discussion Starter #1
I needed to replace my truck's front bearings and got a bearing packer tool. I saw one that had stacked plastic cones but I went for one that had stacked metal cones, thinking that it would be more durable than plastic. In short, it was a disaster. The cones didn't seal against the bearing faces and the grease splooged out over the top face of the bearing. The instructions caution me not to tighten except by hand, but I couldn't get it cranked down to work. (Shredded my fingertips in the process.)

Do plastic cones work any better than my luck with metal cones?

Any idea if a "handy packer" is any better than cones?

At this point, I'll just hand pack the dumb things. :shrug:
 

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Been doing it all by hand for 30+ years...

"We don't need no Stinkin' Packers..." ....lol...

IMHO....Just another product that you don't really need...

You're going to get grease on your hands anyway...so you might as well do it all yourself...

Besides, I can pack a bearing and impregnate it with my hands in less than half the time it takes to setup and use a "Packer"...

I'm with 2nd66...

If you're worried about getting grease on your hands....You're in the wrong hobby....lol...

:eek:)

Tony K.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
One vote for plastic cones, one for a handy packer, and two for manual packing.

The longer version of my bearing story is that I replaced driver and passenger side inner/outer bearings, but I couldn't drive the inner race all the way in on the driver's side. I hand packed the bearings, but with that race refusing to go in the final 1/4", I knew I was living on the edge.

I checked out press prices and decided I could BUILD a better one that Harbor Freight sells at the same price so I bought some square tubing, a 12-ton bottle jack, springs, etc. and phoned my neighbor to ask to borrow his welder. Unbeknownst to me, he sold it 2 weeks ago. Grrrrrr

So now I had to rent a welder, buy a helmet, wire, etc. and throw even MORE money at the project.

Refusing to give up, I now have a gold-plated 12-ton press.

I bought another set of bearings and a bearing packer to make sure that I got those things fully loaded with grease since this was becoming a comedy routine. Never failing to resist being a laughingstock, I couldn't get the stupid bearing packer to work right (read my first post in this thread.)

I think I'm going to skip with the packing tool. I'm worried I'll get frustrated and build a $50 version of the $20 packer.

Tony, I think my problem is that I'm TOO willing to get my hands all greasy! I out-think, out-engineer, out-over-react too often instead of just slowing down and going the easy route!:grin2:
 

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"front wheel bearings of this type get driven in with a hammer and punch .never seen anyone try to use a press on them"

I'll 2nd that...

A hard Rubber mallet and a piece of wood are your best friends....

:eek:)

Tony K.
 

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Many, many years ago, a guy doing the alignment on my 65 gave me a heads up before he would do the job. He showed me that the front bearings needed to be replaced, and he demonstrated on how to do them by hand. Been doing them like that ever since.
 

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been doing it the old fashion way since the 70's > by hand. Yes it takes a few minutes longer but it works. I'm going to be replacing the front wheel bearings on my F350 soon and will pack them by hand.
 

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I've packed countless bearings the "ole fashioned way" then my fil bought me the "handy packer" and I love it. Bearing positively packed in moments.
 

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I still pack by hand too. I tried the handi-packer, but I think success depends on what grease you use. I used to use the Red Mobil 1 Synthetic, and after sitting for some time the oil would separate out of the grease leaving a stiff clay mess. BTW, that will tend to happen with any grease left too long in the gun.
 

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I've got the device like Hemikiller uses and I've got the plastic cones and both work equally well. They're cool "gadgets" but I haven't used them in years because the handpacking is easier with less mess. Yeah I know a handful of grease isn't "clean" but fresh grease is very easy to clean off your hands and you can reuse whatever doesn't get used if you're so inclined.
 

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What would we do without Ron Popeil who owns "RONCO"...... I think that dude is 84 now...

https://www.ronpopeil.com/

:eek:)

Tony K.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
front wheel bearings of this type get driven in with a hammer and punch .never seen anyone try to use a press on them
A hard Rubber mallet and a piece of wood are your best friends.....


I might not have been very clear: I had to use a press to get the race seated.

I used a hammer and drift to remove the 4 races. All came out without much fanfare. I was able to get the passenger side races in using a hammer. The driver side outer went in just fine by hammer, but the driver's side inner refused to go in the final 1/4". It just stopped. I put it all back together and crossed my fingers that it wouldn't matter, but it did. It growled worse than before.

Using the press, I used the old race as a drift between the new race and the press anvil. The race slid in just fine until it was about 1/4" from bottoming out and then it stopped. I gave the press 2 more pumps and the race pinged and then suddenly moved deeper. A few more pumps and it bottomed out.

Today it is quieter than it has been in over a year. :pirate:

A hammer wasn't much of a friend. A rubber mallet is a frenemy!
 

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I might not have been very clear: I had to use a press to get the race seated.

I used a hammer and drift to remove the 4 races. All came out without much fanfare. I was able to get the passenger side races in using a hammer. The driver side outer went in just fine by hammer, but the driver's side inner refused to go in the final 1/4". It just stopped. I put it all back together and crossed my fingers that it wouldn't matter, but it did. It growled worse than before.

Using the press, I used the old race as a drift between the new race and the press anvil. The race slid in just fine until it was about 1/4" from bottoming out and then it stopped. I gave the press 2 more pumps and the race pinged and then suddenly moved deeper. A few more pumps and it bottomed out.

Today it is quieter than it has been in over a year. :pirate:

A hammer wasn't much of a friend. A rubber mallet is a frenemy!
Hey , If it worked for ya party on. I would have suspected bad machining at the point it wouldn't seat but :shrug:
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I would have suspected bad machining at the point it wouldn't seat ...
Yeah, it could very well be that. On the other hand, it's got a couple hundred thousand miles on it, 140K of them before I bought it. Maybe at some point someone had a bad hammer swing and nicked the race inset.

My old truck is a little like our old mustangs- you never know exactly what's happened over its life and gotta roll with what'cha got.

I appreciate y'all weighing in, though. Good info. I'll be a hand packer moving forward...until next time. :grin2:
 
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