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Discussion Starter #1
Just curious if anyone on the forum has opted to spray their car with bed-liner, -vs- paint.

I've been actively working to coat every square inch of the interior, undercarriage and engine compartment of my 67 coupe with U-Pol Raptor coating, and during the process have been pleasantly surprised by how easy this material is to work with and the benefits of having it upon all surfaces.

While working through this build I've been thrown numbers in the $8k-$30K range to paint the exterior. While I understand paint and body work is labor intensive, and for some of the craftsman upon this forum the end result is a culmination of a life's work. I'm not looking for concourse build quality, just a nice exterior finish.

While I understand the allure of a meticulously detailed paint job. I'm still at a loss for the time and money it takes for maintenance and upkeep such a piece.

Just curious is anyone else has considered spraying their exterior with a urethane bed-liner.
 

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68 Mustang Coupe
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If they have they probably wont admit it publicly. If you've ever seen a bed lined with bed liner after a few years you'll realize it doesn't hold up well. It chalks up really bad IME. If cash flow is an issue, spray it with SPI epoxy primer and run it.
 
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Discussion Starter #3
Not a cash flow problem, more of a trust issue.

Exterior paint will be close to the last item to be addressed on this build and the paint that is currently on the car isn't ideal, although it's good enough to protect the exterior while I go crazy on the drive train and the supporting components.

Thanks!
 

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I'd do the cheapest Maaco paint job before putting bed liner on the exterior of a mustang. Maybe if you're building a beat up Jeep for offroading and you put in the UV additives so it doesn't chalk up, then OK...but not on a vintage car.
 

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If you're going to paint it down the road, I definitely wouldn't do it and have to try and remove all that crap in the future ! Personally, I don't like it even on offroad rigs where it actually makes sense.
 

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You'll be adding on to the cost of the future paint job. Whoever decides to take on the job will have to remove every bit of the bedliner before prepping the metal for paint. Then you'll become part of the shop lore: "Remember when that guy brought in the Mustang that had bedliner sprayed all over it?"
 

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Spray primer coat and enjoy, totally acceptable back in the day!
 

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I used a product called STEEL-IT. Coated the whole car in it. It’s very very tough considering it’s used by trophy truck guys for frame and suspension components. Check it out
Steel-it

It’s very inexpensive for what it is. But it will outlast most quality base coat clear coat paint jobs. Plus touch up is easy as pie just keep a few aerosol cans around. It comes in both gallons and aerosol. It’s not exactly going to be a show quality finish unless your metal is perfect but for a race car its perfect
 

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There's a reason you don't see more classic, sports, muscle, (insert everything except off-road buggy here) cars with bedliner paint jobs...… For all the reasons mentioned above, plus the added weight, likely heat retention, and most of all- it'd be fugly as h#ll. Couple that with the fact that your resale value would plummet like a rock. The obvious general consensus if you haven't already figured it out, is don't do it! Pretty much any actual paint or primer job will be a better choice..
 

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I have a good friend who is a Line-x dealer and does a large amount of full body sprays. It seems to turn out well and hold up to a lot of abuse. That said, and as mentioned above, it's normally only done/requested on jeeps and trucks. The Jeeps overwhelmingly outnumber anything else and most of the guys getting it done are doing full tubs. These are the guys doing serious wheeling and need the protection.

I can't imagine anyone doing it on a daily driver, let alone a classic car. It looks right on the stuff you might take off-road but would look completely out of place on a mustang... new or classic. To each their own..... but also don't do it!
 

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After removing an old dried up hard vinyl top I used 4 cans of spray bed liner for texture and 4 cans of plistidip for a nice feel . clearly not for everyone
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Thanks for the input, while I don’t think Ill
be traveling down this road myself. I had a feeling this topic may ruffle some feathers of the purists. Was more curious if anyone had done it on a classic Mustang.

Currently, I haven’t sprayed any of the exterior color areas, although the floors, dash, all interior panels, roof truck, wheel tubs, and roll cage has been completely prepped, primed with 2k epoxy primer and then shot with Raptor, as the majority of these components will be covered upon reassembly.

If anything all of the original steel on this car will essentially be coated in plastic, which should effectively preserve it for many more years to come, which for me is worth more than any concerns for resale value.

It’s a 67 coupe, V8, with factory AC, not like it’s ever going to be breaking any records at Barrett Jackson.
 

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67 coupe, 69 Sportsroof, 86 hatchback
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How do you actually remove Line-X, Rhino Liner, etc?
 

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'69 Mustang coupe...331, Fox / Explorer EFI, TK3550, MDL, SoT, TCP, Fays2 Watts, 94-04 Cobra discs
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I plan to plasti-dip mine...:sneaky:
 

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I've spent the last 3 days removing bed liner from the engine bay of my 67. It looked like they opened the hood and sprayed everything.
 

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I've used Raptor liner on the pans and inside the wheel wells of a 1965 restomod daily driver. I realize it's not for everyone, but I think its a viable option for a modern build that will be driven. I would still recommend properly preparing the surface and lay down a solid coat of epoxy prior to the bed liner. Like any paint, adhesion will only be as good as prep. Unless you are going extreme, Mad Max vibe, I'm not one for using it on exterior panels or within the engine bay, but that is just my opinion.

751155


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