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Discussion Starter #41
FWIW if you have 15x7x4.25 225/60/15's will work ,in theory. At this point every car is a little different and actual tire dimensions are subject to change
If they will fit, I would not mind having that size at all. I guess I could do a test fit with one. Maybe Discount Tire will still let you do that. I was actually hoping I might come across someone local with that combination that would let me to a test fit.
 

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Discussion Starter #42
View attachment 741702

These are 225/60/15's that I just got from my local tire shop to play on with the go fast. They were cheap (I don't need them to last as I won't ever wear them out before they will be replaced) and are H rated. Sorry I don't have the front wheels yet, (should be here Friday) and no engine in it anyway to get a good look.

Probably not what you're looking for either but who doesn't like pictures...:sneaky:

Allen
Do post back after trying out the front wheels/tires. What's the width and backspacing on your new wheels? Tire brand and model?
 

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What about Comp TA radials do they make them in your size. I am running 205/60/15
225/60/15 BF GT TA radials leas than 500 miles I’m dumping them this week for more handling sticky tire. My car is a week end warrior.
not sure where you are located
But I’m trashing them. You can have them. Tread depth I would say 9/32nd. Or a little less. I’m running 15x7 TDD I don’t know what backspace is on my wheels. I bought them back in 2013 as a tire package
 

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Those are cool, but unfortunately the price point is just unrealistic for a driver.
my K codes and Shelby's were all drivers. Everyday drivers. No millionaire either. And the most fun I ever had with any of them was when I saw the light and put on the Avon's.

Will they wear out in 15,000 to 20,000 miles. Yes they will. Especially if you seek out the deserted 2 lane twisty roads like I do. But every one of those miles will be unforgettable.

You don't have to break the speed limit to enjoy them either. Any curve or round off ramp will get you grinnin'.

Z.

PS great tires are like great top of the line shocks, they will absolutely transform a cars "personality". Why people spend 5-10k on a drivetrain, then play miser on the suspension is one of life's great mysteries.
 

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Jumping in this thread too to see what kind of advice people continue to give, as I'm in the same boat as you. Unfortunately there are not a lot of people who are super knowledgeable about good sticky all-season street tires so it is hard trying to pick tires. But I am also looking for a new set (215/65/15 is the current size Jane wears, but I guess 215/60/15 is a lot more common) as my current tires are 7 years old and pretty hard. At least, I think they're hard, because I think I'm spinning the hell out of them in 1st but they're not making any noise, just sending the car sideways.

Probably whatever tire ends up working for you will work for Jane as well, but I think it's important to note one thing that I (and probably you) are looking for that immediately rules out half of the tires suggested in this thread: GREAT (not just acceptable) wet weather performance. When it rains in Texas it floods, bad, so tires need to stick in a few inches of water. Period. There is no getting around it. I'm not interested in sitting stationary in my car for three hours because it's raining and I picked the wrong tires, it needs to go in flooded roads nearly as well as it does in the dry weather. This is especially important in our light cars where hydroplaning is a much higher risk (and probably more important for a fastback than a coupe for the same reason).

I'll trade treadwear if I can get a tire that sticks in wet and dry conditions for at least 15,000 miles. I don't care about brand or anything else, it just has to stick. But it is very hard to find good reviews of a tire where performance in multiple conditions has been tested.
 

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Kelly, I tend to rely heavily on The Tire Rack's tire ratings, which includes wet and snow. Tire's tend to perform better IF you can eliminate the need for driving in the cold/snow and get out of the "all-season" category. Some of the "ultra-high performance summer" tires do very well in the wet. The problem is, most tire's wet performance drops drastically when you get towards 1/2 tread depth or more. So you're left replacing tires "early" if deep water is a top priority.
 

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Kelly, I tend to rely heavily on The Tire Rack's tire ratings, which includes wet and snow. Tire's tend to perform better IF you can eliminate the need for driving in the cold/snow and get out of the "all-season" category. Some of the "ultra-high performance summer" tires do very well in the wet. The problem is, most tire's wet performance drops drastically when you get towards 1/2 tread depth or more. So you're left replacing tires "early" if deep water is a top priority.
Yeah, the problem is that TireRack's ratings are largely based on user ratings. So, in the case of RWL tires, for example, the ratings tend to be skewed upwards because people go "well my BFGs didn't send me into a lightpole when it sprinkled when I was going home in my parade car the other day, so 10 stars for wet traction!". TireRack does do its own comparative tests on street/track in different environments and I trust those ratings much more but for some reason they don't rate all of their tires so sometimes there's just no good data available.
 

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One interesting feature of Summit Racing's Website is that you search for tires by size and then see what vehicles they were originally installed on. The newest vehicle that used 215/60r15 Tires is the 2004 Oldsmobile Alero, in 2003 the Malibu and Grand Am also used them. How many 17 year old cars still need these tires to justify keeping them in inventory? If Coker tire ever goes out of business, the hobby is in trouble.
 

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Discussion Starter #51
What about Comp TA radials do they make them in your size. I am running 205/60/15
225/60/15 BF GT TA radials leas than 500 miles I’m dumping them this week for more handling sticky tire. My car is a week end warrior.
not sure where you are located
But I’m trashing them. You can have them. Tread depth I would say 9/32nd. Or a little less. I’m running 15x7 TDD I don’t know what backspace is on my wheels. I bought them back in 2013 as a tire package
Some years ago, My friend had those on his 70 and they are actually not a bad tire. They had good grip and decent wet road traction. I don't see any of them listed currently for sizes I could use. We have the BFG Comp G-Force Comp2 AS on the Cobra and they are really nice. Would love to find something like that in 15 inch sizes.
 

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Discussion Starter #52 (Edited)
my K codes and Shelby's were all drivers. Everyday drivers. No millionaire either. And the most fun I ever had with any of them was when I saw the light and put on the Avon's.

Will they wear out in 15,000 to 20,000 miles. Yes they will. Especially if you seek out the deserted 2 lane twisty roads like I do. But every one of those miles will be unforgettable.

You don't have to break the speed limit to enjoy them either. Any curve or round off ramp will get you grinnin'.

Z.

PS great tires are like great top of the line shocks, they will absolutely transform a cars "personality". Why people spend 5-10k on a drivetrain, then play miser on the suspension is one of life's great mysteries.
I'm sure they would be fabulous, but I just can't justify the price at this time for those tires. I wish I could. Yeah, I figured they weren't going to last 50k-60k miles, but don't want to have to buy new tires every few years either, I'd like to get 5 or so out of them. I'm not heavily concerned about tread wear but would like it to be decent as well. I need new Bilstein shocks to replace my KYB GR2 shocks first. I know, not the greatest shocks. I do have a few some suspension upgrades and modifications. My pony car fun money is just not as much as I would like.
 

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Discussion Starter #53
One interesting feature of Summit Racing's Website is that you search for tires by size and then see what vehicles they were originally installed on. The newest vehicle that used 215/60r15 Tires is the 2004 Oldsmobile Alero, in 2003 the Malibu and Grand Am also used them. How many 17 year old cars still need these tires to justify keeping them in inventory? If Coker tire ever goes out of business, the hobby is in trouble.
I really thought that some cars maybe minivans a little newer than that used this size. If those are the last cars made that use them, that definitely is not a good thing for us.
 

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Discussion Starter #54 (Edited)
Jumping in this thread too to see what kind of advice people continue to give, as I'm in the same boat as you. Unfortunately there are not a lot of people who are super knowledgeable about good sticky all-season street tires so it is hard trying to pick tires. But I am also looking for a new set (215/65/15 is the current size Jane wears, but I guess 215/60/15 is a lot more common) as my current tires are 7 years old and pretty hard. At least, I think they're hard, because I think I'm spinning the hell out of them in 1st but they're not making any noise, just sending the car sideways.

Probably whatever tire ends up working for you will work for Jane as well, but I think it's important to note one thing that I (and probably you) are looking for that immediately rules out half of the tires suggested in this thread: GREAT (not just acceptable) wet weather performance. When it rains in Texas it floods, bad, so tires need to stick in a few inches of water. Period. There is no getting around it. I'm not interested in sitting stationary in my car for three hours because it's raining and I picked the wrong tires, it needs to go in flooded roads nearly as well as it does in the dry weather. This is especially important in our light cars where hydroplaning is a much higher risk (and probably more important for a fastback than a coupe for the same reason).

I'll trade treadwear if I can get a tire that sticks in wet and dry conditions for at least 15,000 miles. I don't care about brand or anything else, it just has to stick. But it is very hard to find good reviews of a tire where performance in multiple conditions has been tested.
I would have thought that since it seems classic Mustangs have a higher number of daily drivers or at least often drivers than most vintage cars, there would be some more people running this size. I guess that is because so many switch to 17s, which I really do not want to do on my car. I'm not that concerned with brand name either, although I don't really want Chinese tires. Completely agree about road conditions here when it rains. It is usually dry, but when it rains things get sketchy quickly as well as other road user's reduced ability to drive. LOL... I don't want to camp out in a parking lot or gas station and wait for the rain to clear up either. I also agree about the tire reviews you see about the TA/Cobra tires that are typically on Sunday drivers. Just because the tire is sufficient and made it home safely doesn't necessarily validate a 4-5 star review. I'm also not really worried about an extended tread life, but would like something at least rated for maybe something like 50k miles so they last longer than 1-2 years like most I've seen with low mileage ratings. The Coopers I have now are rated for 70k miles and H speed rated. I'm still thinking about getting one last set while supplies last. I'm just concerned they may have been hanging out in a warehouse collecting dust and getting hard. Hoping something else magically shows up before I decide.
 

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I'm just concerned they may have been hanging out in a warehouse collecting dust and getting hard.
Check the DOT code on the sidewall of the tire near the bead. DOT XXXX XXXX YYYY. The YYYY is the week and year the tire was made. If you see YY15 don't buy them. YY19 is good, YY20 is better but highly unlikely to be seen.
 
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