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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey,

I know this question has probably been answered a few times here...but then again, every time something is asked, new hints and tips come up, so I thank all of you in advance for responding :). At any rate, I may be purchasing a 66 Mustang hardtop in Wimbledon White. The first order of business is to paint it, as the current owner has most of the trim, etc. removed and sanded down to the original factory paint in some spots (it has a very amateurish, wrong color white on it right now).

My question is what you guys think is the best method for getting the current paint off...i'm a complete newbie, so the more details you have, the better. Right now, from what i've gathered, I should use 1200 grit emery cloth on my orbital sander and just go at it...I've also heard chemical strippers recommended, and wet sanding as well (soaking paper in water every min or two). Anyone got any faster, better looking, etc. suggestions?

Also, any suggestions on things specific to mustangs that should be masked, covered, etc. or tips on this? Also, little spots that should be painted that I'll probably miss?

Last thing...how bad of a sin is it to change the color of the car? White isn't too bad, but I'd love an inky black stang...just looks so mean, but its not original, of course.

I know its a big post, but any little bit of info is completely appreciated, because i am a total newb!

Thanks,

~JP
 

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I used Aircraft paint stripper. I also media blasted the edges/hard to get areas. I started out sanding - but it is too tedious. However, there is no easy way to do it yourself.

Check out the results on my link below.
 

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Well, first off, get a couple good books on the subject of painting your car. You can check out amazon.com through this link:

http://www.vintage-mustang.com/amazon/reading.html

If you purchase through this link, VMF gets a pittance of your total...

Check through the listings on Amazon for the "How to paint your car" type of books. Be sure to check the publication dates of the books, try to purchase ones that have been published or revised within the last 5 years or so, as paint technology has changed dramaticly in the last decade. Many are still available with no mention of basecoat/clearcoat paints. Paint and body work is one subject that you cannot read too much about. Research, research, research...

Your local auto parts stores will generally carry a very limited amount of body repair materials, mostly consumer grade and of poor quality, so find a local auto paint supply house, look under "Auto Body Shop Equipment & Supplies" in your Yellow Pages, and get friendly with them. They will supply you with all the information and materials you can handle. Most importantly, don't try to impress the guys at the paint store with what you think you know, be honest and tell them what you don't know and are willing to listen and learn. Giving them the "Well, I read" or "I heard " lines will not endear them to you. Be honest and ask intelligent questions. Remember, these guys do paint for a living, and it's only your hobby....

As far as removing the current finish, a 5" or 6" D/A sander (random orbital) with 80 grit discs is the probably the most accepted way of removing paint quickly without overheating the metal, or going to far too fast. Get a good brand of pressure-sensitive adhesive discs, like Norton, Mirka or 3M, which are available in rolls of 75 up to 175, depending on brand and grit. Don't buy cheap discs, as you will use them up faster, and it will end up costing you more.

A word of warning: be prepared to spend some significant money on materials. I am doing all the body work on my 71, and have spent well over $700 on sandpaper, surface cleaners, primers, fillers, reducers and other supplies and I already have ALL the air tools. This doesn't even include the $200 gallon of RM Diamont basecoat, and the $100 gallon of clear....

A quality paint job is not cheap by any means.

Base/clear is the only way to go IMHO.

What you will mask depends on how far you want to go. If you just want to refinish the exterior, then there is a lot of masking to do. The deeper you get, the less you have to cover, because it has already been removed. A truly first class job would require you to basicly disassemble the exterior and start from scratch.

On the color change, it's your car, do as you want.

Remember that black shows ALL of the defects in the body, white hides very well.....
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hey,

Sorry bout confusion-just to clarify, I'm not gonna be trying to paint it myself. Just hoping to save cash by doing some of the prep work myself. The sanding is something I've been having trouble finding good info on. I've looked into a few different books and stuff. Some places say go with a very high grit, like the 1200 i said earlier, and some say to go with something close to the 80 you recommended. I was hoping to not have to buy a new sander, and just stick with the cheap one that I have that takes pieces of paper, but if I have to, I will.

Thanks for the info, and other opinions are still welcome!

~JP
 

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I don't want to sound like I'm putting you down, but when it comes to body and paint work, leave it to the professionals. I admire your fortitude to take on such a huge task. It would surely be gratifying to do all your own body work and save a ton of money to boot.
But remember, a paint job is only as good as the body work underneath it. As a body man it breaks my heart when someone comes into the shop and asks me to fix all thier mistakes. It usually ends up costing them double.
A good body man is an artist who has honed his skill for many years.
Again, I am not saying you will do a bad job, but doesn't something as beautiful as your mustang deserve better?
Heart surgury looks pretty easy to me, but I'm not going to attempt doing that any time soon.
 

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If you can find a shop that Soda Blasting that is the way to go, it does not damage chrome or glass and it does not etch the metal so you do not have to paint right away as the metal will not rust, i had my 67 Shelby done this way and the cost was under 500, with chemicals it is very difficult to get it out of the nooks and crannys and any left that you do not see will lift the paint after a while, sand blasting will etch the metal and will have to be treated to prevent rust, with soda blasting they wash the car right after and any residue just dissolves,
 
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