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Discussion Starter #1
My 69 Mustang has been sitting for a few years and I'm in the process of replacing the power steering pump and hoses. While under the car I noted the dirt and corrosion (see picture) and I'd like to clean that up and arrest the decay.

Whats the best approach without complete disassembly?

Wire brush?
Chemicals?

Thanks for your advice.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
It's odd that all my pictures post upside dow yet they are right side up on my system/Google photos.
 

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That's just normal surface rust. Most of that would be simpler to replace with new parts, which would be about $400 for a compete front end rebuild. Parts that don't get replaced can be cleaned up with wire brush or sandblasting, then painted in correct colors.

If you just want to halt any further corrosion, pressure wash and do a Fluid Film treatment.

To be honest, my main concern would be the oil pan that is stuffed in from what my guess would be an off-road excursion.
 

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To be honest, my main concern would be the oil pan that is stuffed in from what my guess would be an off-road excursion.
Hehe, Black Velvet & sideways down a dirt road and you end up with a crunched valance, wrinkled right rocker panel and crinkled oil pan. That is going to be replaced before I drive it. I missed the power pedestal when I stopped spinning. Thank goodness we live in a very rural area.
 

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I guess it depends on what level of detail you are expecting, if you want to do it assembled you are not going to achieve a very good result so you might as well use a manual wire brush to remove most of the loose rust and metal prep (TM sherwin williams) to clean and treat the surface (carefull, it is corrosive and shouldn’t contact your skin or machined/painted surfaces), then apply non automotive black industrial enamel with a paint brush to avoid making a mess with overspray.
If you choose to disassemble you can achieve much nicer results, I would sugest only sandblasting the parts that do not have machined surfaces, powdercoating parts that do not have plastic content and using POR15 on other stuff.
Unfortunately either way there is a LOT of labor involved, but I’d rather spend more time disassembling rather than trying to get into all the hidden areas.
 

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- Drive it to a coin car wash early on a Sunday morning. (Or any time there aren't people waiting for the car wash.) Bring a bag of quarters. And a floor jack.


- Pull into the car wash stall and jack the car up as high as it will go with the jack under the center of the differential. (Use a piece of wood between the jack and the diff to prevent damaging the diff housing.)


- Pump some quarters into the coin box and select "SOAP".


- Carefully blast the bottom the car to remove the crud. Be careful to not get under the car in case of jack failure!)


- Keep blasting until you can't remove any more crud. Then set the coin box to "RINSE" and go over it again.

I think you'll be surprised at how well this works. Of course, if you have a pressure washer, no need to visit the coin car wash.
 

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I'd start with steam cleaning/power washing to get the grime off then move on the a phosphoric acid rust remover product and brass brushes. At that point a careful inspection and assessment will determine which parts have reached the end of their useful life. To the extent your suspension and steering components are suffering from deferred maintenance and need to be replaced, it will be somewhat easier to get the old parts off when they are clean.

As for cost, an earlier post suggests a "complete front end rebuild" can be had for $400. In my recent experience a "complete front end rebuild" that includes quality suspension and steering parts plus rear shocks, will be significantly more by a factor of 5x. Compromising quality would result in some savings.
 

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As for cost, an earlier post suggests a "complete front end rebuild" can be had for $400. In my recent experience a "complete front end rebuild" that includes quality suspension and steering parts plus rear shocks, will be significantly more by a factor of 5x. Compromising quality would result in some savings.
Wear parts for the front end of a 69, quoted it out through RockAuto with all Moog components - came in a bit over $400. Last I checked, rear shocks are not part of the front suspension ;)
 

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For a quick fix, blast with pressure washer, decrease anything greasy. Dry, wire brush the loose stuff off, then hit painted surfaces with good coats of rustolium rust restorer. Be careful to just paint the parts don't overs-spray everything and tape off the aluminum or it will look like crap. DEFINITELY mask off any rubber, paint will kill old rubber! I use a piece of cardboard or three to contain overspray or if your really diligent, masking tape and paper to do it right. I did this on a Jeep I bought that sat for a season in the grass, everything was surface rusted. It will look much better, and will get you to your next rebuild where you can paint it correctly (e.g. strip, prime & good quality paint or powder coat) and/or put in new parts. If the car stays outside, it won't last but a two years, if its parked in the grass, weeds or a field, maybe 3 months, that is absolutely the worst thing you can do to a car, traps moisture and no air circulation under the car, Mother Earth reclaims her minerals - they dissolve like an Alca-Seltzer in water... I wouldn't worry about the pan till next time the steering comes off or the engine comes out if the car runs ok but that's just me especially if you haven't learned your Black Velvet lesson yet...
 

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OP, my undercarriage is showing its age, but not as near as bad as yours. I've been slowly replacing parts that will likely need to be replaced in the near future (lower/upper control arms, etc.) and have been cleaning the rest with a wire wheel attached to my angle grinder. After cleaning it off as much as I can, I'll hit it with some rust converter (2-3 coats) topped off with some type of primer and rubberized undercoating.

I generally hit one section of the car every two-three weeks. Last week, I worked on the area near the driver's side front fender.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks! very helpful.

Based on all the feedback I'm going to power wash, clean, then disassemble and replace/repaint.
 

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Wear parts for the front end of a 69, quoted it out through RockAuto with all Moog components - came in a bit over $400. Last I checked, rear shocks are not part of the front suspension ;)
When I say "Complete", I include having Chockostang rebuild the original box, pump, control valve, ram, and fresh hoses. Price out his work and you are in about 8 bills deep. Opentracker supplied domestic Moog tie rod ends, lower control arms, roller spring perches, roller idler arm, blueprinted upper control arms, Bilstein shocks all the way around and the other odds and ends burn through another $1200+. Like the word "restored" I suppose "Complete" can have different meanings. :grin2:
 

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Wear parts for the front end of a 69, quoted it out through RockAuto with all Moog components - came in a bit over $400. Last I checked, rear shocks are not part of the front suspension ;)
I agree and Moog are among the best parts for suspension and steering. If you ad a sway back and stabilizer links that would be another $150 but you could upgrade to a 1" sway bar at the same time. While you're at it you can do the Shelby drop for free since you have your upper CAs out. The template and drill bit is about $20 plus get a Scott Drake export brace for another $70 and maybe throw in a Monte Carlo bar for another $40. So for under $600 you'll have a car that has a tight front end and cornering will be unbelievable from what you had. Your power steering doesn't look like it leaks so you don't have to spend any money there.

But if you want to add a complete suspension kit go with the Eaton improved handling springs front and rear, and new shocks.. That will put you just over $1000. But well worth the investment. Your steering will be tight and your ride will be better than new.

Take all the old suspension parts out, then pressure wash the undersides then put all new stuff back in. While you're at it but a new oil pan.
 

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if you are going to disassemble,as mentioned, there are a few things that do make the cars handle amazing, it will likely double the cost of Rock Auto (not counting shocks) but the difference in performance is night and day. If you plan to keep the car and you like a sporty feel, it will turn your understeering grocery getter into a fun toy. Most of the front end was designed with rubber instead of roller or heim-jointed joints. These work find to go get cigarettes (hey, it was the 60s) but when you replace the rubber with joints, the binding goes away and fun begins.

Here is a prioritized list:

Arning Drop - if you remove your upper A arm this is a must

Roller lower control arm
New Moog Upper Control Arm if yours is worn (Rock auto is Ok better is Open tracker's blueprinted - he welds a tab so they don't come apart, doesn't happen often but...)
1" sway bar
Koni or Bilstein $$$ shocks (Sport valved)- This is outslde the budget but WoW - best if you do the rears also
620 springs - teh lack of rubber stiffness will need stiffer springs
Roller SPring perches
Adjustable heim jointed strut rods These are $200 and can be added later if you want, do not buy performance Urethane strut rod rubbers, stick with stock if you can't afford these strut rods just yet

Beyond the front end

Monte Carlo bar
Export brace
Lower Brace under the oil pan - Google Zray lower brace

Avoid gas shocks on Mustangs especially on the rear...

Call John at Opentracker and speak with him, he will steer you right for what you want to invest and talk you through the options. He takes care of all of us very well...
 
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