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I had an old-timer tell me this years ago, but I've never tried it. Nothing has an affinity for rust like water. Nothing penetrates rust like water. He said they would pour boiling water on rusted bolts. He said it works great. Sometimes you can even hear a popping sound as the chemical bonds break apart from the boiling water penetrating into the threads. One day I want to try this.
The popping sound is probably from the heat expanding the parts. Might have less to do with it being water.
 

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Tighten the bolts before you loosen them. You are less likely to break the bolt tightening it and if it moves then the bond has been broken. As previously posted- work the bolt back and forth while applying your favorite penetrant.
 

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I come from a different school. Very painful to try and drill out a sheared off bolt / stud, so I take a hardened drill bit, and make a series of holes down to the thread. If I can get to both sides or even enough to chunk a section of the nut off, it is very good. The nut, sectioned or cut completely, can be shot with WD or such, where all the threads are exposed, plus a few taps with a chisel opens up the nut, and it either spins off or just flops off.

The stud threads may take a slight beating, but a die or even a clean nut will tidy them up.

The nut is going to be tossed anyway, so why risk snapping off the stud. Just kill the nut before it can be the leverage to snap off the stud.
 

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I come from a different school. Very painful to try and drill out a sheared off bolt / stud, so I take a hardened drill bit, and make a series of holes down to the thread. If I can get to both sides or even enough to chunk a section of the nut off, it is very good. The nut, sectioned or cut completely, can be shot with WD or such, where all the threads are exposed, plus a few taps with a chisel opens up the nut, and it either spins off or just flops off.

The stud threads may take a slight beating, but a die or even a clean nut will tidy them up.

The nut is going to be tossed anyway, so why risk snapping off the stud. Just kill the nut before it can be the leverage to snap off the stud.
I like your idea, if we were talking about studs. But that doesnt work so well with exhaust manifold bolts.
 

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I never really had issues with bolts breaking on older Ford motors outside of exhaust head pipe studs. Maybe I was lucky. Now my GT40P, that was a different story!
 

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I had this very problem with some exhaust manifolds off a 302 and I wanted to replace the studs. I did a lot of what all has been mentioned above with penetrating oils and so on and even using a 3 to 5 foot cheater and nothing. I finally gave in called a friend I know who is jam up metal worker/welder and he told me bring them and would see what we could do. He mounted them in a vice adjusted a pair of vise grips on the about now ruined studs from me trying to move them. He told me getting them hot enough was the key. Well I had put some heat on them myself got them cherry red but nothing like what he ended up putting on them. Just watching I thought well if nothing else there going the melt because they where that hot. He got them very cherry red and then some and kept it there and when I thought well there so hot and cherry red there not going to be any good anyway but he just kept a steady pull on those vise grips and sure enough the stud just starting easing out with just a steady pressure on the vise grips by hand no cheaters or anything like that. He got all 4 out that very way. Like I said I had put the heat on them but nothing like what it took to release them. The threads where not damaged in any way at all my new studs I had went in like a dream. Just my experience and how it was solved. If I had kept doing it my way no doubt I would have broken them off or broken the manifold as they are cast. With enough heat I think it would work the same for yours. Good luck.
 

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Soaking and heating are both common methods that often work. Vibration is an often overlooked method to up your success from 50 to 100 percent. An air powered rivet gun pounding on the head while applying torque after a good soak will near guarantee perfect results. Unfortunately available space under the hood may prohibit its use. Simulating that pounding action with a hammer and short piece of brass bar will certainly help.

I also have a tool designed to do this with a standard socket and hammer. When hitting the tool with a hammer it applies loosening pressure. The harder you hit it, the more pressure it applies. You might search online for a Hand Impact Drive Hammer. Snap on has one for around 40 bucks. I am not sure how well known this methodology is but I certainly know it works.
 

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I also have a tool designed to do this with a standard socket and hammer. When hitting the tool with a hammer it applies loosening pressure. The harder you hit it, the more pressure it applies. You might search online for a Hand Impact Drive Hammer. Snap on has one for around 40 bucks. I am not sure how well known this methodology is but I certainly know it works.
Guys that do heavy equipment use impact/vibration as do some restoration shops. I didn’t find out about it for quite a while. I don’t know if it’s that well known.

I saw earlier today on You Tube a new (to me) Blue Point tool that was an air hammer bit with wrench flats and a socket drive on the end. I’ll get one off the truck this week.

Here is the 3/8” version

Here’s a 1/2” manual impact driver. Didn’t see a Snap On 3/8” online or in the paper catalog.

Edit: Lisle has a manual 3/8” impact driver, part #29200.
 

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I used this stuff that was recommended by my machinist.
Kano Kroil in the aerosol can.
Used it a couple months ago when I removed my original never been removed original manifolds. Was replacing them with Doug Thorley(NOT Doug's) headers after the DS cracked all the way through between #6 & #7 on my '65 289. Worked great, bolts came out like butter.
See my post here if you want to know which headers do and don't fit: https://www.vintage-mustang.com/threads/header-success-3rd-times-brand-the-charm-doug-thorley-headers.1165994/post-10257778
 
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