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This sounded too bizarre to be true but apparently some folks have experienced static discharged ignited fires while refuelling. Seems to be something the Petroleum Equipment Institute has become increasingly more aware off. Here's an URL to read more about this: http://www.pei.org/static/index.htm.

The short of it is, do not sit down in the car after you start pumping gas and then get out of the car and touch the gas pump nozzle. Probably not a problem with our Vintage 'Stangs since I've alway had to hold the nozzle to the car - it would pop loose if I tried to hook it to the filler tube and lock the handle.

Be careful out there, folks.

Dean T
 

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Someone up in Santa Fe (NM) was pumping gas w/talking on a cell phone, and somehow the cell phone caused a spark...no one died, but it made headlines.
-Brian
 

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Yes beware several years ago I was putting Fuel in my super gas car in the basement garage of my house,static electricity started a fire from the fumes off the vent of my fuel jug.Luckily I have a fire extinguisher on the wall.
there is nothing scarier than a fire. Robert
 

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whenever I refile my girlfriend's car I always start pumping and then sit back down into the car, get out of the car and put the pump back onto the pump-holder. I've never blown up, and I've done it at least 100 times!

As for the Mustang, I have to hold it as well... At just the right angle too, or it spills everywhere, lol.
 

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When fueling an aircraft a ground wire is required to avoid static sparks. The chance of static sparks are highest on a dry day. I suppose the fuel nozzle at gas stations are grounded and grounds the car on contact; I cannot visualize any sparks other than on initial contact, and unlikely at disengagement.
 

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If you have a pick-up with a poly bed liner and you are filling plastic "jerry" cans you can build a hell of a static charge on the surface of the cans. As soon as you move them..ZAP--POW. It happened locally here. The guy lost his hair. Happened when he shut his tailgate and the cans jiggled. The tailgate was a shield. Lucky guy. It's recomended that you put your cans on the ground when you fill them.
 

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you`re right, you should never fill a plastic can in a truck with a bedliner! put it on the ground
 
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The honcho at one of the area offices I take care of was working on his motor home, changing the
fuel pump and filter, had a quart jar of gas he'd drained and static got him. It flashed, he dropped the
jar and it broke and splashed. Burned his arms, hands, and all down his legs, about took his nads off.
He was out for better than 4 months. Nasty mess.
 
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you`re right, you should never fill a plastic can

This also goes for any metal jerry can, especially if you've been carrying it around on the roof (i.e. offroad excursion). The air going past the can while driving builds up static, then when you go to fill it up, the static discharges and kaboom. This is oft-repeated wisdom in the 4x4 world where jerry cans are used regularly.
 
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