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I'm replacing all of the lines on my '68 FB, factory disc car. Any tips on getting all the air bled out? Should I fill the master up and let it sit for a few days to let air work itself up, or just bolt everything together and start bleeding straight away? Is it helpful to bench bleed the master in this situation?

Thanks,

Andrew
 

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I'm replacing all of the lines on my '68 FB, factory disc car. Any tips on getting all the air bled out? Should I fill the master up and let it sit for a few days to let air work itself up, or just bolt everything together and start bleeding straight away? Is it helpful to bench bleed the master in this situation?

Thanks,

Andrew
Yes, by all means, bench bleed the M/C. After which, proceed in this order:
right rear, left rear, right front, and finish with the left front.
Depress the pedal slowly, until a steady stream of clear fluid, devoid of bubbles, is present. When finished for that cylinder, lock the bleeder while the pedal is at the bottom of the down stroke. After locking each bleeder, depress the pedal several times. As you progress, you should feel more firmness in the pedal.
This procedure has served me well over the years.
Good Luck!
 

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yeah what he said. the old fashioned method is the best.

they have all kinds of power bleeders nowadays but you cant beat the pump and
crack the bleeder screw way.
 

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I bleed the master after it is installed. I have a helper pump the brake pedal three times and hold it. Then I slowly loosen one of the lines to the MC. Have a big rag under the line to catch the fluid that comes out. Then release the pedal and repeat. Once you have fluid coming out of the port the MC is bled. Caution - have the cover on or fluid will fountain out of the MC.
 

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Actually, it's no longer recommended to pump the pedal in between, as this can aerate the fluid.

Bleeding Brakes
 

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me and my dad built a power bleeder for our brake lines because they were dry and we didnt want to pump. we just put a couple of parts together and put a pressure guage on it we put it together for about 10$. what you do is install the M/c and screw in the break line to the power bleeder. then you put the fluid into the top of the resevoir cylinder. then you istall a compression line from a compressor. when you open the valve you are putting about 4 ~5 pounds onto the break lines. now all you have to do is go to each tire and just open the bleed valve just a little and it will come shooting at within 2 seconds which means that now that section is filled with fluid. it would be good practice with it to fill the resevoir with fluid after every tire because if you run out now you are putting air in, also just after filling the resevoir just open up the valve to let the presssure go back to about 4 ~ 5. then after you are finished with all tires you unscrew it off the power bleeder then screw it back onto the master cylinder. undo the bleed screw on the M/C to let the air out that you let in from transfering the break line. then slowly push in the break peadl to let the air seap out and replace with break fluid and when it is coming out screw hole have a friend or someone (hold the break or not) screw it back in and now you have a air free line with very minimal pumping. and since you didnt put you had no chance of sucking in air. if you guys want a picture of it just let me know.
 

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Actually, it's no longer recommended to pump the pedal in between, as this can aerate the fluid.

Bleeding Brakes

Yep, I too know about the aeration of brake fluid. This is why it is recommended to "slowly" depress the pedal between operations, it tends to normalize the system.
You made a good point!
 

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I bench bleed the MC. Then rebleed it in the car, just for good measure. I do all 4 cylinders in the correct rotation, then go back and do it again...for good measure. I use a small bottle with fluid in it so I can bleed the brakes by myself. I use the wife to bleed the MC when it's in the car. AND...what ever you do, do not let the MC run dry.
Dave
 

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You let the MC go dry and it's back to the starting line...
 

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Definitely bench bleed the MC, and always refill it to near the top after each wheel. Like jfstang said, don't let it go dry or you have to start all over! (Happened to me when I was on the last wheel and man did that piss me off :))
 
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