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1965 Ford Mustang Coupe
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Discussion Starter #1
so, I replaced everything Eaton powersteering this winter, bbn it I'm having trouble getting all the air out of the system. any advice or ideas how to get this done before spring shows and cruises start? just fyi before someone suggests a vacuum pump. they dont exist with a fitting for the eaton fill hole.
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Spinning the wheel with the engine running, stop-to-stop has always worked for me.
 

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a trick i use when the system is completely empty is I raise the wheels 2 inches off the ground and fill it while a helper turns the wheel lock to lock with the engine off
eliminates any sudden surge or dry spots
 

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I'll second 22GT- exactly the way I do it. I've had a few that took awhile, or had to be held at full lock for a few seconds, but it's always worked. If you continue to have air, check for a leak in the system...
 

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Why do you think you have air in the system? They are self/automatic bleeding. Once system has been turned to full lock to lock, ZERO air can exist in the system, air goes right back to pump can through the return which is a vented can..
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Why do you think you have air in the system? They are self/automatic bleeding. Once system has been turned to full lock to lock, ZERO air can exist in the system, air goes right back to pump can through the return which is a vented can..
because I replaced every piece of the power steering system with new parts, and the instructions specifically state warranty will be voided on control valve and pump unless properly bleed out air d uh ring initial install of new parts.
 

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I think what Chock meant, was why do you think you have air in the system ie- is it noisy, is it gurgling, etc. If you've done the lock to lock thing, the level is correct, and it's not noisy- you're done.
 

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Other than turning the wheels lock to lock after replacing a part and then topping off the fluid. I have never had to bleed air from any power steering system as a professional mechanic working on phone company vehicles for 30-years. I never had a part fail because I did not bleed the system. The air automatically finds its way back to the reservoir because you have a pressure line feeding fluid in and the air is pushed back through the return line. Its not like a brake fluid line where there is only one pressure line and no return line. so the air gets trapped in the line.

The type of vehicles I worked on was limited to domestic made vehicles and its been awhile so I did an internet search to see if there was new info and there is. Apparently there are modern cars that require bleeding using a hand held vacuum pump. I'm guessing they throw the warning notification into every pump they manufacturer. I have never heard of anybody having a problem on a vintage Ford from not bleeding the power steering.

I might be that they want to make sure there is no air in the pump at initial start up so the pump vanes do not start off dry. I would spin the pump by hand a few time to circulate some fluid around the pump vanes and it should be fine.


Power steering bleeder cap. A new tool I don't have, it never ends. This is for the newer, large plastic Ford caps and might not fit the small vintage metal caps.

Mityvac MVA662 Ford Power Steering Air Bleed Adapter | Tool Discounter
 
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