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I’ve seen several posts about ways to add Bluetooth audio to our Mustangs. I’ve been planning for awhile to go the Bluetooth amp option, as it allows everything to appear stock and I like how stealth it is. The options aren’t as plentiful as you’d hoped, but the Kenwood model gets consistently good reviews. Found it this weekend for $75 off the retail price on Amazon, so I pulled the trigger. It’ll be awhile before I install it, but wanted to share the deal with everyone here in case anyone else is interested in this option.


I plan to run a 4x10 DVC in front and 6x9 DVC in the rear from Retrosound. The speakers are rated at 140 watts RMS I believe, and they’ll get 90 from the amp. Should be plenty of power to safely run them. Plan is to run power directly from the battery, and then add a bullet connector to the amp’s switched power lead so the amp gets switched power from the factory radio connection on the wire harness (to avoid it draining the battery).
 

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I'm running this amp with a retrosound head unit and JL Audio 5.25" in the front and 6x9 in the rear in my 68. I used line-out adapters for the front and rear speakers to send the signal to the amp. This will give you the option of running a bass amp in the future if you decide to upgrade (the amp has a front/rear signal combination output signal available). It's a great amp and I would do the same setup all over again. The only drawback is I put the amp wired remote in the glove box and if I want to switch to Bluetooth I have to pull over and dig the remote out to do it.

BTW, the amp fits nicely behind the heater vents under the dash, which makes it really easy to access if necessary.
 

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I run a google tablet or my phone, depends on mood etc... to a Bluetooth audio receiver, that then runs through a physical volume knob via RCA's and then in to my trunk for a 5-channel pioneer amp. The amp then feeds a pair of 8" subs hidden behind the rear panels in custom ported boxes and 4 5.25 infinity kappa speakers with separate tweeters upfront installed into my one piece headliner. It took a lot of tuning, and I have spent a TON of time on sound deadening. But the end result is honestly better than I ever thought a car from this era could sound.
 

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I was thinking about just leaving the stock radio in place on my son's 66 car and putting stand-alone Bluetooth speakers that become live with the ignition in the dash top, under dash, behind rear seat and he could set it to pair with his phone.
 

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I was going to go the bluetooth amplifier route to keep my stock radio, but I couldn't figure out a good location for it (it would get too hot in the cardboard glovebox). Instead I'm currently doing what 1966notch did - putting a single DIN receiver in the trunk under the package tray. This gives me AM, FM, HD radio, and the ability to easily add an amplifier or replace the stereo with something more modern (new technologies) in the future.
 

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I have that same Kenwood amp minus the built in blue tooth and added a JL Audio Bluetooth adapter.
Hid both behind my center console with Velcro and so far works great !
 

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I was thinking about just leaving the stock radio in place on my son's 66 car and putting stand-alone Bluetooth speakers that become live with the ignition in the dash top, under dash, behind rear seat and he could set it to pair with his phone.
I set up similarly. My BT receiver, amp, filter, LOC are in the trunk on a board that mounts to the shock holes. Power to the BT receiver comes from the stock radio that has been gutted so that now it is only a switch for the "big boy stereo" in the back. To hear big sound, you gotta turn on the AM radio (light works too!)
 
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I'm consistently surprised at how many people are happy listening to music through Bluetooth. To me, it sounds no better than FM radio and that's really not that great here in the 21st century. I hear wireless technologies with much better fidelity are in the works, but until those become widely available, I'm sticking to direct connect from my phone. I guess I'm an audio snob deep down. :cool:
 

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The stereo system in my `66 coupe runs via Bluetooth. I found a very obvious improvement in streaming sound quality by switching from Spotify to Tidal HiFi for the streaming service. I think the magnitude of any improvement gained by doing this change would depend on the quality of the audio equipment you have, and of course the cost of the monthly subscription to the Tidal HiFi reflects the higher quality it delivers. The improvement in sound quality is because the sound files are uncompressed, resulting in streaming at over 1,100 kb per sec as opposed to under 350 kb per sec for compressed music files like those delivered by Spotify Premium. Qobuz also offer a HiFi service, and there may be others as well, so Tidal HiFi isn`t the only option.
 

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I do that even better by having FLAC files on my phone, and just playing those. Don't have to worry about being in a dead zone with no service to stream.
 
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