Vintage Mustang Forums banner
1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
963 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Actually just body, been getting some quotes for my 69 mach1 and don't want to be taken advantage of.
Just trying to get a realistic idea how many billing hours it will take to get my car ready for paint.
It's a rolling shell, no glass or trim etc. No body work, no rust. Overall, I would say it's pretty straight.
Just the exterior, jambs and under the trunk lid and hood. No wheel wells, engine bay, trunk or bottom.
Needs the be skimmed/floated, sealed/primed and panel alignment. I'm asking for driver quailty. I describe that as comparable to what comes off the assembly line these days. I would think collision shops do that everyday. (i know collision shops aren't going to touch this) How many hours should it take to get it ready for final paint? Thanks
 

·
Registered
1969 Mach 1 351 Black Jade
Joined
·
169 Posts
Area you take it to will dramatically change price, I live in North Jersey so I was paying top dollar as hourly rates are generally higher. If they tell you everything will be around 10k I'd say thats about what you will be paying for a full paint job. Make sure to get several rough estimate quotes and make sure you've seen their previous work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
963 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
From what you described here’s my take on it:

Down to bare metal: 24 hr
Body work and prime: 24 hr
Block and spray: 24 hr
72 hr x $75/hr = $5400

Hopefully this isn’t a shock to you. Don’t forget to add material costs in. That’s another $3-4k.
Does 72 hours take it to the point it’s ready for final paint?
I’ve been quotes ranging from 80-100 hrs. I thought the 80 was a lot. I’m not going to quibble. Thanks again
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,173 Posts
Do you know what the shell looks like in bare metal from previous restoration? When I took mine to bare metal I also thought it was straight but uncovered several areas that were poorly repaired in the past and at least 100 "door ding" type damage dents, maybe 200. That may drive up your body work hours some depending on the actual condition. 24 hrs for body just sounds light to me but it could be spot on too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,450 Posts
Chin Jaw Font Photo caption Eyewear


You're going to get prices all over the board on this one. Location, location, location. As Goat mentioned- make sure you see previous work, get as many reviews as you can, and get EVERYTHING agreed upon in writing BEFORE you drop off the car. My F100 is still at a body shop almost 4 years after I dropped it off. The guy does excellent work, but moves as fast as a turtle stuck in mud. There's still a glimmer of hope that I'll beat Fordguy to the finish line, but it's fading daily.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
366 Posts
Does 72 hours take it to the point it’s ready for final paint?
I’ve been quotes ranging from 80-100 hrs. I thought the 80 was a lot. I’m not going to quibble. Thanks again
The 72 hr was just a rough number to give you an idea and did include prep and paint. Obviously hard to really say without seeing the car. If you’re getting 80-100 hr on quotes that’s reasonable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42,892 Posts
Does 72 hours take it to the point it’s ready for final paint?
I’ve been quotes ranging from 80-100 hrs. I thought the 80 was a lot. I’m not going to quibble. Thanks again
I, also, would be in the 80-100 hour range. Also beware that you may not find many people (maybe somebody who does paint on the side) willing to do a "driver quality" job (except maybe MAACO or Earl Scheib) as folks don't want their name associated with a "so-so" job.
 

·
Premium Member
1965 Mustang Cp. Ford Laser Red. 351W stroked to a 427, Borla 8 stack injection system, VERY Custom.
Joined
·
1,150 Posts
I'll tell you that if you ever want to know why something is so expensive do it yourself and experience it (even if you don't do a whole car try a fender or something small).

I painted my car in my garage. I even did the engine bay. The body itself was pretty straight because I had it done by the pros about 10 years prior. However, the engine bay was completely untouched and I wanted it smooth. So, I cut out bad metal and welded in new metal. I body worked the entire engine bay. I then sprayed it with epoxy primer because it was taken down to bare metal. I then primed it, blocked it and applied a sealer and got it ready for paint.

I have many hours invested in the engine bay in metal work, body work and sanding. Damn, the sanding :eek:. It's a lot of work. I know you are not having your engine compartment done, but the same amount of time and effort will go into your body in order to have it prepped for paint. Especially if it's taken all the way down to bare metal.

Also, everything is crazy expensive these days. If something cost $7K pre-COVID it's probably $10K today.

@Zarsk said $5400 + up to another $4K. That equals $9400. @GOAT69 basically said $10K. Based on my experience I'm inclined to agree with their estimates. However, we have not seen pictures of your car and since it is NOT in bare metal yet we have no idea what lies beneath.

I wish you luck. Be prepared for the $10K mark and be happy if you get quoted less, but also know some might even charge you a few K more. It's all in the amount of repair your car needs, the labor rate the shop charges and the cost of materials (which isn't cheap in the automotive paint world).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,402 Posts
just as a guideline I paid $12K flat price in 2014 for complete tear down to bare metal, reassemble, paint and show quality rub out
took 6 months to the day. I didn't have much bodywork beyond what he saw so there were no extra surprises.
give todays inflation, who knows. $20K isn't out of the question
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,095 Posts
Although we see the "skim coat" think on car TV shows, that's not always the best approach. Nothing wrong with body filler, but there's no reason to coat the entire car with it. I used high build primer and blocked it a couple of times and it worked great.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,695 Posts
Mine was 15k here in NJ. Had a lot of new after market sheet metal on it and took down the rest down to metal. Fitted the panels, blocked and painted was 15k and that was without making any major changes to the new panels but added metal or taking away to get a perfect gap. The gaps are good but not perfect which was fine as it's not a show car but has a really nice paint job now. Would have been about another 5k to get everything to perfect 3/8" gaps.

Wheel Tire Car Vehicle Plant
 

·
Registered
65 Coupe / Family owned since 21 APR 1964
Joined
·
790 Posts
This is a tough discussion given many variables we just don’t know - most dealing with the car and the other dealing with the local options, economy and skill sets.
Having gone through about an 18 month body shop experience, I would have to agree with the recent posts above. Mine was costly due to the shop having to redo what a prior shop had done poorly. That and I wanted several metal work mods that I did not get to prior to my car coming up on the shops queue (it was an 8-10 month wait just to get in at the time) etc. My desires and change from driver to more show resulted in my wallet spontaneously combusting about a year in..

I too feel if you are using a good shop who is concerned with quality and doesn’t want a classic, which they know will have social discussions and reviews to leave the shop with a “quick job”, - be prepared for well over $10k. And if $10k isn’t that big of a shock it’s probobly because you want it done right.

A good shop probably won’t even quote you a hard/firm $$. Your car will be on the clock. My monthly invoices (of which I would recommend) had three columns: Hours, Materials, Parts. I scrutinized each one.

Im sure I’ll sleep poorly tonight from just thinking about this topic/bringing up memories.. 😜

Best of luck on your car!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
792 Posts
I'll give you some visual references for my paint project. Car had zero rust and was in epoxy primer. For labor which also included installing all the seals, install new R valance, install bumpers, door handles and latches, hood and trunk latches, etc. the labor was $6,400 and the total material cost for paint, primer, seals, etc. was $1,600. $8,000 total. Panels painted off the car, all done in a paint booth, etc. PPG wimbledon white. Went single stage which saved several grand in labor and materials, and love the results. Crazy-deep gloss, excellent panel gaps, and slicker than a snotty marble. :)

Off to the painter in white epoxy primer:
Wheel Tire Car Vehicle Window


Work that down as needed and then primer:
Flooring Gas Automotive exterior Composite material Wood


Then body color (PPG Wimbledon White)
Wood Automotive exterior Machine Automotive wheel system Automotive design


Car Vehicle Tire Hood Wheel

Tire Wheel Car Vehicle Hood

Fit new valance:
Car Hood Vehicle registration plate Vehicle Automotive lighting


Vehicle Car Tire Wheel Hood


Car Vehicle registration plate Vehicle Tire Grille


Wheel Tire Car Vehicle Plant
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,529 Posts
I'll give you some visual references for my paint project. Car had zero rust and was in epoxy primer. For labor which also included installing all the seals, install new R valance, install bumpers, door handles and latches, hood and trunk latches, etc. the labor was $6,400 and the total material cost for paint, primer, seals, etc. was $1,600. $8,000 total. Panels painted off the car, all done in a paint booth, etc. PPG wimbledon white. Went single stage which saved several grand in labor and materials, and love the results. Crazy-deep gloss, excellent panel gaps, and slicker than a snotty marble. :)

Off to the painter in white epoxy primer:


Work that down as needed and then primer:


Then body color (PPG Wimbledon White)



Fit new valance:






View attachment 860969
Looks good...!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
963 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
This is all the type of replies I expected. I’m not expecting any surprises. I did a almost exhaustive search for rust and filler spot sanding things down everywhere. Oh I found some!! It’s was removed and rust was replaced. There cone some door dings, but they shouldn’t be a huge issue. Most of the skimming is mostly over some patches. All the old paint, three layers, will be removed. I think I’ve decided to go with a friend of a friend. Came highly recommended. He’s seen the car and was pretty impressed with what he had to work with. He quoted 80 hrs to get it ready for final paint. Told him if it takes a little more for some extra love that’s ok.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
I recently took my wife's car into a body shop to get the grill fixed. They do some very good work. Just out of curiosity I ask what a complete paint job would cost? They said that they had recently done an older hot rod and they took it down to bare metal and did a small amount of rust repairs and the cost was a little over $13K.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,001 Posts
View attachment 860918

You're going to get prices all over the board on this one. Location, location, location. As Goat mentioned- make sure you see previous work, get as many reviews as you can, and get EVERYTHING agreed upon in writing BEFORE you drop off the car. My F100 is still at a body shop almost 4 years after I dropped it off. The guy does excellent work, but moves as fast as a turtle stuck in mud. There's still a glimmer of hope that I'll beat Fordguy to the finish line, but it's fading daily.....
I started a 70 F250 this spring and have plans to finish it next summer. It’s a full frame off, nut and bolt restoration. So I’m going to handily beat you both. Just in case it makes you feel worse.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top