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Discussion Starter #1
Loading on options seems to be a past time among some mustang owners. I get it. But I also appreciate a stocker "grocery getter" because I suspect far more of those were sold 50 years ago than an A code GTs with 4-speed stick.

I've been reading a thread this week about dealer installed options and it got me to thinking about just how stripped down a mustang could have been, when the dealer slid the keys across the formica topped fake wood desk to the proud new owner and said, "here 'ya go, you're brand new mustang!"

It would have had:
6 cylinder straight six with a 3-speed stick
3.50 rear axle
6.5 x 13" four-ply skinny wheels with "flat plate" wheel covers
Standard interior
No power anything, four-corner drums
No rocker panel molding on hardtops and verts until '66
No backup lights until '66

I would think that there would have been a "heater delete" credit available. How much, $10? Was there a blanking plate at the controls instead of the the three chrome sliders and switch?

There had to have been a "radio delete" plate but since the AM radio was an option, that wouldn't have been a credit. I can't imagine how ugly a dash would look with BOTH the heater and radio delete plates!

Any other reductions/deductions?

It might not have performed nearly as well, but visually, I don't think that a bottom-of-the-line mustang looked very much different from a well-equipped one!
 
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1967 Mustang Convertible
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My first Mustang was like that. 67 Coupe, 200ci, 3spd manual, standard blue interior,No AC, No PS. Not sure what the rear end was. Sold it to get the car I currently have. I did like that car, but I blew a freezer plug when I was trying to go 90mph for an extended period of time. Never ran right after that, I think I overheated the engine, but the gauge never went all the way up, just 3/4 of the way up. I do think those cars are becoming more rare. Last time I went to a car show out of the dozen or so classic Mustangs only 1 was a straight 6 and 4-5 of them showed T code so they where supposed to be 6s but had been converted to V8s.
 

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personally i dont like the phrase "bottom of the line" sounds like the car was an after thought. i much prefer the term "base model", since that indicates it was the least expensive, but you could option the car as needed. as for the options list, i dont need much in these cars, a/c and heat, and a decent stereo. anything else i consider a luxury for these cars.
 

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Yes, he missed that. 3:50 for K code, but T's probably had 2:something rear.
Standard/baseline cars sold in great numbers so most were buying for style, beauty, economy, and the least expensive option!
Ron
 

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1966 Mustang GT 4sp Nightmist Blue
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I remember cars coming into the restoration place I worked at called Mustang Country in Santa Rosa, Ca with heater delete and radio deletes that we “upgraded” back in ‘86 and the owner knew how rare these were and hoarded them.

Chris
 

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Yes, he missed that. 3:50 for K code, but T's probably had 2:something rear.
Standard/baseline cars sold in great numbers so most were buying for style, beauty, economy, and the least expensive option!
Ron
depends on the transmission

automatic had a 2.80 gear standard

3spd manual had a 3.20 gear standard.

go figure since the automatic cars needed more help getting off the line in those days.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
personally i dont like the phrase "bottom of the line" sounds like the car was an after thought. i much prefer the term "base model"...
That's fair. I meant it as the opposite of "top of the line". Actually, I think it's more about a "sub-base model" since it would include deletes/credits like the heater.

Incidentally, for my daily driver, I have a near bottom-of-the-line, er, barely base model 2003 F-150. A/C and A/T are the only options it has. It's a 4.2L XL short bed single cab with a rubber floor in the cab, and has hand crank windows. 210K miles. I love it.

Yes, he missed that. 3:50 for K code, but T's probably had 2:something rear.
Maybe my source has a typo. It can happen. I'm getting my info from the Mustang Recognition Guide put out by the editors of Mustang Monthly.

763647
 

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As I recall the story Iacocca told the Mustang design team that the car had to be priced at less than $2500 while having a "sporty" look to it. He knew the market for the Mustang would be the Baby Boomers who were becoming adults. For you young whippersnappers the Baby Boomers were those born between 1945 and 1965- the children of the servicemen returning from WWII. Needless to say Iacocca read the Boomers' minds perfectly and they bought Mustangs faster than Ford could build them. Since most of these buyers were on a budget they probably tended toward the "bottom of the line" cars.
If you look at some of the original Mustang ads you will also see that Ford marketed it towards the parents of the Boomers. There are ads showing men in suits with women in dresses going out for the evening in a "top of the line" Mustang.
So depending upon your financial situation you could have a base model at $2500 or a deluxe model at $3500.
 

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1968 coupe, 1968 vert, 1966 coupe
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Funny how a 3 speed then was considered bottom line now I think most would prefer that on a early mustang as opposed to a c4
 

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Discussion Starter #13
As I recall the story Iacocca told the Mustang design team that the car had to be priced at less than $2500 while having a "sporty" look to it...you will also see that Ford marketed it towards the parents of the Boomers.
Absolutely spot-on. Here are Iacocca's eight parameters.

I remember a quote I think it went like "you can sell a young man's car to an old man, but not an old man's car to a young man."

@Asm109 - that's a pretty scant list (but probably the two most desirable options at the time depending on where you lived.)
763667
 

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#3- 4 passenger capacity.
I recall reading somewhere that members of the design team wanted the Mustang to be a 2 seater. Iacocca told them "No!" because he knew these Boomers would be making babies and a 2 seat car was impractical for them.
 

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depends on the transmission

automatic had a 2.80 gear standard

3spd manual had a 3.20 gear standard.

go figure since the automatic cars needed more help getting off the line in those days.
I had a 65 Ranchero that originally came stock with a 6 cyl and 3 speed manual. It was converted to a 289 before I got it but they left the 4 lug rear end. It had a C4 transmission as well. That 3.20 rear end explains why I felt like that car had good omph of the line. I assume it would have been the same rear end across the mustang, falcon, and ranchero lines.
 

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I also got a 66 with just the 2V 289, an auto transmission, and AM radio for options... but I added stuff that made the car more sporty, or more convenient, or more fun for me... just the way it was done in 66...AND I used original Ford parts.
I got an original 4V intake and 4100 carb, an original C60E-G clutch and fan for a heavy duty cooling package, original Kelsey-Hayes front disc brakes, 5 original 66 Styled Steel wheels, two-speed wipers with washer, an original correct color aqua console and an original black Rally Pac, original deluxe belts with reminder lamp, and lots of Rotunda stuff available at the Ford dealer in '66 like parking brake warning lamp, headlights-on buzzer, glove box lock (keyed to match trunk lock), remote trunk release, junior size tissue dispenser (my kid has lots of snot), litter basket (to put snotty tissues in)...
I had a set of original Mustang faded blue floor mats but they kind of disintegrated. I do have a black set of repro floor mats now.
I stayed away from sinking money into stuff I would never use like a TV, mini vacuum, horseshoe bumperettes, and air horns. That stuff is for a serious collector with deeper pockets than I...
 

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My '67 was optioned with an automatic transmission, rocker panel molding, and an AM radio. I've gotta imagine that's pretty basic, even among T codes. Haha.
 

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#3- 4 passenger capacity.
I recall reading somewhere that members of the design team wanted the Mustang to be a 2 seater. Iacocca told them "No!" because he knew these Boomers would be making babies and a 2 seat car was impractical for them.
The original Mustang 1 concept car in 1962 was a two seater. Iacocca teased it to get the buzz, but apparently never intended for it to be a two seater in production.
 

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My two option 66, today rolls with Styled Steel wheels, center console, rally pack, 4 barrel manifold and carb, oh and a toploader 4 speed to replace the 3 speed.
 

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My parents 67 had a 289 2V, AT, AC, PS, PB (drums), console, vinyl top, full wheel covers, rocker moldings and was Lime Gold.

Pretty well equipped I thought, I always wanted to swap in a 4V but my mom wouldnt have anything to do with changing anything on the car.

My first 65 was a base model car, no options, nothing deleted, I was the second owner I think it had less than 50,000 miles on it when I bought it.
 
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