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Discussion Starter #1
Hopefully I can get some quick
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advice. I got a set of new front caliper pistons, installing them and noticed the piston is slightly protruding. I am not sure if it's supposed to be flush with the rubber dust seal or if this protruding is correct. I just got them like this from npd a few days ago. I got one installed and when i spin the rotor it is def rubbing. wasn't sure if this would be fixed after i bleed the brakes. Ive attached a pic of the caliper.
 

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Seem apparent you have installed one caliper, then rotated the rotor. If you indeed have accomplish this, CRUISE.
Bolt on other side, all is well. A little friction is the norm.
 

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Just stick something flat in front of the piston and push it back in with a "C" clamp, it will go back easily. Normally you just use the old brake pad but you probably don't have one those.
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The single piston caliper setups are always a little sloppy. The pad may rub a bit when you first do the job, but it'll be fine.

FYI- if they didn't mark left and right, or you mix them up, the bleeder has to point towards the rear of the car, not vertically. If it's vertical, you need to swap them side to side as you'll never be able to bleed the air out.
 

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It looks pretty close. The caliper should fit over the pads without force. Step on the brake pedal hard before you put the wheel on and check that the pads are flat against the rotor. There might be a bit of drag when you spin the rotor by hand, but it should work well when you first drive it.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for all the help. I tried using a C-clamp and one of the old pads, that piston wasn't budging so I figured that it was probably meant to come like that. Installed both calipers and pads, no issues, slight rubbing on both sides, but everyone seems to agree that's normal and it'll seat just fine. Gotta bleed the brakes now, get some fresh fluid in them. Hopefully all goes well. This whole process has been a bunch of "firsts" for me, so it's been entertaining and frustrating at times. Thanks again for the help, I'm sure I'll have more questions as I tackle different projects.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
As expected, I have another question. So I bleed the brakes with the new rotors, calipers, and pads. I was able to get clear fluid out of the bleeder valve and seemed to have gotten all the air bubbles out. Now my question, once all of that is completed the rotor is pretty tough to spin by hand. Is this normal? Is the piston supposed to contract and let the rotor spin freely? I guess my concern is taking it out on the road and overheating the rotors, calipers or pads.
 

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The new pads are a bit rough and the rotor won't turn easily. Sit in the car and "test drive" your brakes before pitting the wheels on. Pump the brakes a bit and the pads should seat against the rotor and piston. The pedal should feel firm now and the rotor will be difficult to turn but it should if you try hard enough. Clean all traces of brake fluid. I take a paper towel and make a little q-tip and stick it in the bleeders to get them completely dry inside. Leave the rubber caps off for now. Get back in the car and pump the brakes hard like a few panic stops. Check the bleeders and just below the caliper for fluid. If there's any brake fluid find out why. Don't run the engine if you have power brakes. You want to "feel" the hydraulics. The pedal should feel like a new car. Carefully check the bleeders and around the piston boots. They should be as dry as they were after you cleaned them. Put the rubber caps on the bleeders and put the wheels on. The rotor should spin a bit easier when grabbing the tire. Now drive the car. Listen for any nosies you haven't heard before. There shouldn't be any. The car should stop straight, like any car. Drive a short distance and check the temperature of the brakes. They shouldn't be super hot or smell bad. It's easy to do if you have wheels where you can see the rotor. If it seems ok, drive on. The rotor might seem hot but the caliper should be less hot. You should be able to touch the caliper without burning your skin off. Be aware wheel bearings can get hot if too tight or make noise if too loose.
 
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