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I am going to start my engine for the first time tommarow. just wanted to know what you guys would advise that i should do for the break in.
 

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the engine is/ has:
289 bored 60 over 297
flat top pistons
289 heads rebuilt with harded stainless steel valves and seats
balanced
RV Cam
Tri Y Headers Patriots currently opne headers right now
2 barrel autolite carb rebuilt
new aluminum 3/8" fuel line
fuel pump with integrated fuel filter
New Water Pump
New Oil Pump
 

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have some joe gibbs oil in it with zinc additive fore the cam friction protection. etc. how many times do you guys think i should pump the oil pump or how long? or any other thing you guys advise for the run.
 

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If you have access to the tool to prime oil pump it wold be a plus. You have the zinc part covered. Run the the engine at 2000 rpm for 20 minutes. If you have to stop, start back where you left off in time making sure to get the 20 minutes in. Monitor oil pressure, leaks and temp. I usually just turn the idle adjustment in enough to get the desired rpm, sit back and enjoy a job well done. Not the time to fool with tuning.
 

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Make sure the timing is set around 6-12 degrees initial before firing it.
 

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Help me understand the 2000 RPM for 20 minutes "thing," please.
How does that help break in an engine and seat the rings?
I'm about to run my newly rebuilt engine for the first time also.

When I have rebuilt or even re-ringed my aircraft engines in the past,
the initial run-in was at full throttle, in-flight, working it hard, to get the rings to seat.
If you didn't do it this way, you would always suffer from high oil consumption.

Of course they were air cooled and this is an apples-to-oranges comparison.
 

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you're mainly breaking the camshaft in, Im sure there are benefits to holding a constant RPM, but hte main mohito is breaking the Cam in.
 

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Help me understand the 2000 RPM for 20 minutes "thing," please.
How does that help break in an engine and seat the rings?
I'm about to run my newly rebuilt engine for the first time also.

When I have rebuilt or even re-ringed my aircraft engines in the past,
the initial run-in was at full throttle, in-flight, working it hard, to get the rings to seat.
If you didn't do it this way, you would always suffer from high oil consumption.

Of course they were air cooled and this is an apples-to-oranges comparison.
Its not for rings, But matching the flat tappet lifters to the camshaft.
The lifters rotate in the bore as the cam turns and they need the breakin run to mate and keep them from causing the cam lobes to go flat.
Its best to vary the eng speeds while doing the 20 min cam/lifter breakin.
Simply turn the idle screw up and down keeping it in the 1800-2400 range every few minutes during the run time. your cam and lifters will last longer.
 

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^^^^. wut he said. also keep antifreeze nearby to refill the radiator, keep an eye on oil pres and temps. what ever you do try not to shut it downn unless you have a bad leak or something is royally screwed like a knock or major oil burning
 

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I learned the hard way. make sure you prime the oil pump our pour some clean oil down the heads if its been sitting a while before you do the first start up. be prepared to deal with over heating and coolant leaks without shutting it down. Its all about the cam and lifters once it fires up, idling will whipe those cam lobes down, that will require a new cam/lifters. so take extra prep time and make sure your ready and everything is set up. new motors will heat up faster because of the extra friction of rough parts. Seating the rings will come later while driving
 

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1) Is the Joe Gibbs oil conventional or synthetic? You want conventional oil for break in.
2) I also like to use just water for cooling when breaking the engine in. If there is a gasket leak you will not get antifeeze (low grade acid) in your oil.
3) I like having a fan running in front of the car blowing on the radiator to help keep things cool.
4) Get an oil pump priming tool if you do not have one and a drill to circulate the oil through the engine before you start it up.
5) Have an extra set of eyes to watch the engine when you start it up to look for fuel leaks, coolant leaks or any other issues. This is very important! You will be too busy and jacked up from starting your engine for the first time to be able to watch for problems.
6) Make sure that your timing is pretty darn close before starting the engine.
 

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Pretty much agree with 6T9.

What I have read is that the most pressure you can put on tip of the lobe of a cam, which is what you DON't want to wear, is at low rpms. As the RPMs go up the inertia of the cam follower away from the cam "floats" it slightly releaving a bit of the pressure on the very tip while it mates to the lifter.

Remember that most cam lobe tips are not flat at the high point, one side is slightly higher than the other so it induces a rotation on the lifter - so the lifter does not just rub in one spot.

The second thing I have read, been told and practice is NOT to blip the throttle for 20 minutes - just hold it steady - don't know why - call it superstition.

+++ on the biggest fan you can find so if it gets warm and it will unless its 20 degrees, you don't have to stop it.

+++ on water for first round

The only difference from 6T9 is that I get a friend (or in my case kid) to hold the throttle so I can watch everything else. I start the engine with my hand on the carb and get it up there (so his inexperience doesn't over rev it) then let his foot take over but I like the suggestion of setting the idle high - might try that next time.
 
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