Vintage Mustang Forums banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,834 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Does it matter?

I followed the Mustang Monthly article today tearing down some seats tracks. Tried to be careful, but I broke the little tabs off my tracks trying to get them apart. Ugh! (The tabs that I guess are meant to keep the bearing things from coming out?)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,022 Posts
That artice should never have been written/published. I knew this would happen to people as soon as I read that article.

Those tabs are "One time Only" tabs.

Looks like you need Ebay.. Used and new seat tracks are on there.

Without the tabs, The roller bearings will roll out the back or the front whenever you move the seat...and even when you don't.

That is the only purpose of the tabs. Just to keep the roller bearings from coming out. That is there only purpose.

PS: When you get new/used seat tracks, Make sure that they are not '69-'70 seat tracks. The bottom mountings are different, even though they will work.

Tony K.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,834 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Could I just get a local metal shop to tack weld a nut (or something) there to retain the bearing? I could grind it off in 42 years when I rebuild them again. :)

There was SOO much rust and crap in there, I can't see how the rails could have been rebuilt without taking them apart.

BTW, these are 69 std seat tracks. I am putting 69 std buckets to get some whiplash protection.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,834 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I have the three I broke off, I think one has been missing from my tracks since new. (Everything looked pretty darned untouched down there).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,834 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Don't know, googled it.

Is there a way to do it without breaking the tabs off? I went very slowly, carefully.... I left one seat assembled so I have something to compare to when I reassemble the one I have apart now. If there is a better way, I'd like to learn it before I get to the other one.

I think the threaded screw sounds like the simplest solution so far.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
375 Posts
Here's what I did with the tracks for my '70. I'm not sure they are exactly like the earlier ones but here goes.
I took a die grainder and ground off the top of the stud/rivet head (that limits the track movement inside) flush with the top of the top track. Took a punch and punched out the remainer of the stud/rivet body in the track and it then will come apart. Take a nut and weld it onto the top track just over the hole left by the stud/rivet. Clean up, grease, assemble and screw bolt into nut to lock assembyl together. Don't use too long of bolt that would hit the bottom track, only long enough to keep rollers from getting by the bolt. Here's some pics.








 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,844 Posts
FWIW the repops fit my 68 perfectly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,834 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
I need to spend more time with my tracks studying how they work. My tracks were pretty dirty, so I could see the range the bearings were moving, and they never came close to the tabs. In case someone missed it, I have been talking about 69 seat tracks. Maybe they are different from the early tracks....? Hell, one of the tabs looked like it was already broken off from the factory. (I only broke three trying various methods of clumsy removal. :) ) The tabs on there didn't look scratched etc either as if the bearings had occasionally been bumping into them over the past 40+ years either.... hmm...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,834 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Check it out, you can see the maximum range the bearings could move back and forth in my track that I haven't cleaned yet.

Yellow = points to the "torx" screw that holds the tracks to the seat, I only have one in for this pic
Blue = things that prevent the bearing from popping out on the lower seat track
Red = things that prevent the bearing from popping out on the upper track
Pink = bearings
green = where the tabs were

The Torx looking screw is MUCH taller than them tabs I broke off, and appears like it would easily stop a bearing making a run for it.

Maybe the tabs were just to keep the bearings in the tracks BEFORE the seat tracks were installed on the seats at the factory? (The "torx" screws obviously won't be installed UNTIL the tracks are attached to the seat.)

Thoughts?

 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top