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I’m 6’ 2” with a 38 inch inseam and I have a lot of problems driving an early Mustang with a clutch. The seat just does not go back far enough. I came up with an idea for a set of adapters that would relocate the seat rearward and I posted the designs for such on the VMF a while back.

Well, I finally built a set this weekend and they work great. They relocate the seat backwards 2 ½ inches. The factory 5” of back-and-forth seat travel is retained. The best part is that there is no welding involved and the only modification to the seat is the drilling of two small holes in the bottom of the seat frame. Also, this is a bolt-on part. The seat can be restored to its stock setup at any time simply by unbolting the adapter, removing it, and installing the seat tracks back into their stock location. Another plus is that the seat gets lower the further back it goes, so you gain some headroom.

I made them out of aluminum angle (easier to work with than iron). I’m pretty sure the aluminum can handle the stress. If you are a maniac then you could build them out of angle iron and they would be strong enough for sure.


Enough teasing – time for peektures:

Here are three shots of the seat installed with the adapters. At this point I had not yet painted the adapters so they are readily visible. One they are painted semi-gloss black they will not be this noticeable.

Here’s the seat all the way back. Notice how close it is to the rear quarter. With the seat this far back I can barely push the clutch pedal all the way in.

http://images.andale.com/f2/115/106/3999584/1088135599172_Seat_Track01.jpg

Here’s a close-up of the front of the seat. You can see the front of the adapters sticking out. I’ve since ground on them a little to smooth out the sharp corners. It would be a little cleaner to put an acorn nut on top of the bolt instead of a regular nut. Also note that the seat adjustment handle now sticks out 2 ½ inches more than it used to.

http://images.andale.com/f2/115/106/3999584/1089734200501_Seat_Track02.jpg

Here’s a picture of the side of the seat. Once the adapter is painted you won’t even notice it.

http://images.andale.com/f2/115/106/3999584/1090563126276_Seat_Track03.jpg

Picture of the hardware used. All of these bolts are 5/16 NC (National Coarse). This is the size of the factory bolt holding the seat tracks to the seat. The top bolts secure the seat track to the adapter and the bottom bolts attach the adapter to the seat. The upper left is a regular cap screw. The upper right and lower right are button-head cap screws. The lower left is a button-head cap screw ground down for clearance.

http://images.andale.com/f2/115/106/3999584/1089212294983_Seat_Track18.jpg


The bottom of the seat with the adapters installed:

http://images.andale.com/f2/115/106/3999584/1090221629739_Seat_Track05.jpg

Close-up of the adapters installed (front). Note the cap screw bolting the seat track to the adapter. This bolt must have a narrow head to fit inside the seat tracks when they slide forward. You could use the original bolt if you wanted to.

http://images.andale.com/f2/115/106/3999584/1089183811660_Seat_Track06.jpg

Another close-up of the rear of the adapter. Note the cap screws holding the adapter to the seat (bottom) and the seat track to the adapter (top).

http://images.andale.com/f2/115/106/3999584/1088888322297_Seat_Track07.jpg

Picture of the adapters installed with the seat tracks removed. Note the cutouts for the seat track release mechanism. The bottom bolt can be a regular cap screw, but the top bolt is underneath the seat track and must be ground down or countersunk into the adapter. Luckily the seat track has a depression right where this bolt is located so it gives you a little clearance.

http://images.andale.com/f2/115/106/3999584/1088888941739_Seat_Track08.jpg

Close-up of the adapter (tranny tunnel side). Note the cutout for the seat track release mechanism and the ground-down button-head cap screw. A conehead machine screw countersunk into the adapter would be better, but I could not find one in the right size.

http://images.andale.com/f2/115/106/3999584/1090093048438_Seat_Track09.jpg

Close-up of the rear of the adapter (tranny tunnel side). A regular cap screw would have been fine here, but the hardware store only had button-head cap screws so that’s what I used. Note the hole to bolt the seat track to the adapter.

http://images.andale.com/f2/115/106/3999584/1090515228051_Seat_Track10.jpg

Seat with the adapters removed. Note the two holes (one on each side) that had to be drilled to make room for one of the track-to-adapter bolts. This is the only modification I had to make to the factory parts.

http://images.andale.com/f2/115/106/3999584/1086591571108_Seat_Track11.jpg

Close-up of one of the holes drilled in the bottom of the seat to accommodate the track-to-adapter bolt. This hole must be big enough for the nut to pass through. You do not want the track-to-adapter bolt/nut to put any strain on the seat frame – it should pass through it freely.

http://images.andale.com/f2/115/106/3999584/1087213183650_Seat_Track12.jpg

Close-up of the front part of the seat (door side). Note that I had to cut away some seat material so that the adapter would sit flat on the seat frame. Also I had to cut a little notch in the plastic deluxe seat trim for clearance.

http://images.andale.com/f2/115/106/3999584/1088207037038_Seat_Track13.jpg

Adapters removed from the seat with the seat tracks installed. The side facing you is the side bolted to the seat bottom. Note the cutouts for the seat track adjustment mechanisms. The middle hole (surrounded by blue marker) is to make room for a rivet head on the bottom of the seat track. The two empty holes are used to bolt the adapter to the seat.

http://images.andale.com/f2/115/106/3999584/1087771586299_Seat_Track14.jpg

Close-up of the cutout for the seat track adjustment mechanism (door side). The empty hole is used to bolt the adapter to the seat. Note that it is 2 ½ inches from the bolt holding the seat track to the adapter. You cannot go back any more than 2 ½ inches because the adapter-to-seat bolt hole would overlap the seat track adjustment mechanism cutout.

http://images.andale.com/f2/115/106/3999584/1088382948529_Seat_Track16.jpg

Another picture of the adapters with the seat tracks bolted to them.

http://images.andale.com/f2/115/106/3999584/1089877213332_Seat_Track17.jpg

IMO the hardest part of this project is finding the proper-sized angle stock. I started with a 2” x 2” piece of aluminum angle 1/8” thick. I cut one side down to 7/8” using a table saw with a 10” cutoff wheel, so I ended up with a 2” x 7/8” angle. I think 1 ½” by ¾” or 1 ½” by ½” would work fine (2” is a little bit of overkill). The short side cannot be longer than 7/8” or it will snag in the carpet as the seat moves back and forth. You could use angle that is 3/16 or ¼” thick if you want. The thicker angle would be stronger but harder to cut. I made the adapters 16” long.

The second problem is finding the right hardware. I was in a hurry and used what Home Depot had. I would use regular cap screws for all of it except the adapter-to-seat bolt that is under the seat track. There I would countersink a conehead machine screw instead of doing what I did (grinding down a buttonhead cap screw). The threads are 5/16” NC.

The last problem is the cutouts for the seat release mechanisms. I used a jigsaw, but you could use a torch or a cutoff wheel.

I'm going to make a Word document out of this post. I'll be glad to make a link to it if someone will tell me how.
 

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Nice job.

This is something that I've wanted to do. I too am 6'2" and my head grazes the headliner. A little extra room getting my legs under the big steering wheel to push in the clutch would be welcome.

Thanks for designing it. I hope you don't mind me copying it.
 

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Thanks for posting this.
I'm 6'5 in a 65.
I'm also going to modify my clutch pedal stop so the pedal sits more even with my brake pedal. This looks like it will give me another 1-1/2 to 2" on top of this seat track mod.
 

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Good job John! Had a little project time while it's raining here in Houston lately? I think even Shelby would forgive two new unseen holes in the car to be able to enjoy driving it more... thanks!
 
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