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It's too hot and I'm too lazy. I know this is an easy job and I'm procrastinating but. . . .

I just found my thermastat in the trunk - not on the car where it should be.

It's been in the low 100's here in Central TX and I really don't savor draining the newly flushed and filled Griffin radiator to put it back in.
The car is not running hot. And I have not driven it very far (since I don't have mufflers yet).

Will I damage the car running without a thermastat until my motivation comes back (and the tempurature drops)?
 

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I dont think it will damage, but your fuel millage will suffer, and also the motor will never reach opperating tempature, which means it won't run effeciently.... The thermostat stays closed until the motor is hot, then lets collant in to keep it at that temp... if coolant is going through the motor all the time, the engine never has a chance to get up to temp.
 

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Maybe you could talk your buddy at the exhaust place to put it in for you ::
 

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I would, but I'm saving all my spare money so I can roll it into logs and burn it this winter.

"Ya know ma'am, weer gonna have to take this hose off here, and drain the coolant out by opening this valve har', then line up the gasket har'. This ain't gonna be cheap." http://smilies.jeeptalk.org/ups/mtk/badteeth.gif
 

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LMAO, I`m lazy too. I wouldn`t bother putting it in until I HAD too
 

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Just a note, excessive wear can occur from being too cool as well as too hot. Your clearences never have a chance to tighten up from normal heat, so everything runs a little "slopier" than if it was at normal operating temps.
 
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Please don't take this wrong but I want to dispell this myth everytime I see it. And alot of people do not get it right.

With all due respect, the faster and more volume that flows thru the cooling system the more efficient the system and the better it will cool. At least that's the way the thermal dynamics courses have it in engineering colleges! If you let the coolant sit in the radiator longer, that means that it sits in the engine longer. As water temperature increases it loses it's ability to absorb heat DISPROPORTIONATELY. What this means is that it takes alot longer for coolant at 200 degrees to absorb a given unit of BTUS than it would at 180 degrees. This causes the engine to cascade into the abyss of run-a-way heat build up and evetually overheating if you slow it down.

The reason that removing the thermostat can cause overheating is that the thermostat induces turbulence into the exiting coolant and allows this turbulence to continue in the radiator making for a more efficient system. The removal of the stat CAN allow laminar flow to set up in the radiator which means only a portion of the water gets cooled. :eek:
 

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Thanks for that scientific explanation, I'm glad someone was able to finally make that point convincingly. I knew about the myth of "not letting the water stay in the radiator", but I didn't know the bit about turbulence.

I would further add that once the thermostat reaches operating temperature, it is basically continuously open anyway.
 

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Even so, the thermostat still plays an important role is keeping the engine operating at the right temperature, whether it's by turbulance or slowing the flow of coolant so it stays in the radiator to exchange heat, whichever theory you prefer. Race cars that don't use thermostats still use restrictors (http://store.summitracing.com/partdetail.asp?part=MOR%2D63440&view=2) where the thermostat would go to reduce the size of the opening the coolant passes through going out of the intake or block and to the radiator, controlling the amount of heat the coolant absorbs.
 

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Install the Tstat at night, when it's 90!;)...
Recommend you install it. However, understand your predicament...
 

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There is no doubt in my mind that there is an optimal point at which coolant flow creates the most cooling for a given amount of heat to dissipate.....I guess we cant automatically say "without a thermostat a car will run hotter".........it probably depends on as many variables as whether or not a carb spacer will increase power.



If I had to wager though......I'd bet the restriction a thermostat creates DOES make a cooling system work better.
 

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Though it is true that it takes longer to heat hotter fluid than cooler, there is a minimum time required that the fluid must be in the radiator in order to sufficiently transfer that heat. If the flow exeeds the minimum time required by the fluid to sufficiently lower the temp then the battle will be lost as it will also not spend enough time in the engine to transfer heat away.. Engineers spent a great deal of time figuring out how much a water pump should flow given the variables of the entire system.
 

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Steve you are forgeting one very important thing with your theory .The air that will carry the heat away is moving the same speed (fan) no matter how fast or slow the water is going thru the radiator . Fast air/slow water - great heat transfer ! Slow air/fast water - little heat transfer !
 

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You don't have to completely drain the system to replace the thermostat...only remove enough water so that the level is below the thermostat. Piece of cake: 20 minute job.

C'mon, topless66: be a grrl gearhead, and not a wimpy houseSWMBO.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
C'mon, topless66: be a grrl gearhead, and not a wimpy houseSWMBO.
Them are fightin' words!
 
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